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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi folks,

I find my greatest challenge in staying within the desirable, safe
bg numbers is not eating too much and not eating too little. I guess
that's common. Going hypo is an alarming experience and takes
much longer to stabiilze than going hyper. By hypo i mean i start
to feel the symptoms even at 4.2. My average so far is
5.6, but there has been a roller coaster some days. A meal consisting of
a third vegetables, a third fish or meat, and a third carbohydrates seems to be appropriate for the number of drugs i take. I read somewhere that all these meals should be of the same quantity and not varied as would be for a normal non-diabetic. Sometimes my supper is too big and my breakfast too small -- that may be the roller-coaster problem. Do you agree with that?


Take care:canada:

Metformin 8.50 x 3
Gliclazide 80mg (minimum dose cut in half)
 

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Never heard of the quantity thing in regard to our meals, but I just eat until I'm full, so it matters very little how big the meal started out being. I had to get over the business of cleaning up my plate, but now if I'm full, I just leave it. If I get the munchies later, I go back & finish my leftovers instead of looking around for something different.

I realize this wouldn't work for anyone having to bolus, unless gastroparesis puts your bolus after the meal, but it works well for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Never heard of the quantity thing in regard to our meals, but I just eat until I'm full, so it matters very little how big the meal started out being. I had to get over the business of cleaning up my plate, but now if I'm full, I just leave it. If I get the munchies later, I go back & finish my leftovers instead of looking around for something different.

I realize this wouldn't work for anyone having to bolus, unless gastroparesis puts your bolus after the meal, but it works well for me.
Hi Shanny,

You are very fortunate to exercise such a liberal diet programme and not suffer any side effects, such as post-prandial snooze attack or hypoglemic jitters. You must have a very good feedback on the right meds. Gastroparesis is mentioned in the Hopkins book, i.e. you may stay high because you are not digesting fast enough, but there are other factors too, most of all sugar and carbohydrates, liver processing, weight, an the number of anti-diabetic drugs, and exercise.

Cheers
 

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Before I went low-carb, I always fell asleep after meals, almost in the blink of an eye. Now that there are no carbs to put me in a coma, my postprandial snooze is a thing of the past. :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Before I went low-carb, I always fell asleep after meals, almost in the blink of an eye. Now that there are no carbs to put me in a coma, my postprandial snooze is a thing of the past. :cool:

Roger! I may be overdoing it on carbos because they help me avoid hypos, or so I presume. I'll try lowering them. Thank you for your reply Shanny.
 

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Hi Irene...perhaps if you can tell us what you eat on a regular day we may be able to help...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Finding an Equilibrium

Hi Irene...perhaps if you can tell us what you eat on a regular day we may be able to help...
Hi d33na,

It varies of course. I'll try present the typical day's meal:

Breakfast:
- 1/2 cup oatmeal with Sucaryl and cinnammon

-OR 1 egg omellette with tomatoes and 1 tsp. unsalted margarine, and 1 strip of dry bacon and whole grain toast;

- 1 Banana OR small apple

- 1 tbsp. peanut butter

- black coffee

-----------------

LUNCH:

-Tuna sandwich with light mayo and lettuce OR a BLT with light mayo

- Vegetable soup OR salad with low cal dressing

- Low cal yoghurt 1 cup

- A few slices of melon or other fruit

-----------------------------

Mid-aft. snack:

- 1 piece of toast and small slice of cheese

- a small bunch of grapes

- nuts or a few crackers


SUPPER:

- cell phone size of chicken, or beef, or salmon, etc.

- 1 cup of rice OR baked potato with 1 tsp of low cal sour cream

- mixed salad

- bread roll with tsp. unsalted margarine

- soup: vegetable, or lentil, or leek 1 cup

- fruit salad or jello unsweetened

------------------------------


Bedtime snack:

- nuts or fruit or frozen yogurt or low cal muffin


I think that's the general idea. The quantities vary and sometimes i am too much in a rush to eat a larger breakfast or the mid-aft. snack. That makes a difference in the bg numbers - lower.
 

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That is a lot of carbs, Irene . . . are you still on the same meds you started with? In my experience, metformin isn't going to be much help with that many carbs, especially if you're on a low dose of it.

For my own food plan, all the oatmeal, bread/toast, fruit, rice & potatoes have had to go & my only carbs come from high fiber vegetables like broccoli & cauliflower, celery, asparagus & artichokes. I got to this place because my meter kept squawking when I ate the other foods & I was trying to keep my numbers under 140 at all times. It just wasn't working. So I kept trimming & trimming until I was left with the high-fiber veggies.

I don't use any low fat or low cal products - those have increased carbs too. As long as I use full fat mayonnaise, real dairy butter, etc., then it compensates for the absence of carbs & my meals are completely satisfying & very tasty.

(right now I'm snacking on marinated artichoke hearts - dunking them in a little daub of regular full fat mayo & it's delicious!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
That is a lot of carbs, Irene . . . are you still on the same meds you started with? In my experience, metformin isn't going to be much help with that many carbs, especially if you're on a low dose of it.

Yes, but my diabetic team does not want a high glubutride dose and so compensates with a high metformin. Metformin btw, has decreases appetite, cholesterol, and is good for the liver and the arthereosclerosis. So, even though it is weak it's a good adjunct.

For my own food plan, all the oatmeal, bread/toast, fruit, rice & potatoes have had to go & my only carbs come from high fiber vegetables like broccoli & cauliflower, celery, asparagus & artichokes. I got to this place because my meter kept squawking when I ate the other foods & I was trying to keep my numbers under 140 at all times. It just wasn't working. So I kept trimming & trimming until I was left with the high-fiber veggies.

Everyone says carbs are not great for diabetes as they increase bg, but really it is the relative quantity of carbs in all foods that countsd, e.g. a potato has 4 calories per gram compared to 9 cals per gram of fat.

I don't use any low fat or low cal products - those have increased carbs too. As long as I use full fat mayonnaise, real dairy butter, etc., then it compensates for the absence of carbs & my meals are completely satisfying & very tasty.

Butter is less artery friendly, i think. Low cal may for example is less fattening, and NO SALT is imortant for keeping blood pressure down which can contribute to retinopathy and other long-term damage.
(right now I'm snacking on marinated artichoke hearts - dunking them in a little daub of regular full fat mayo & it's delicious!)

The thing about the foods you eat is that it takes some time to cook and prepare, so i guess carbs are an easy way out for me. But as just about everyone agrees on this issue, i thank you for your advice.
 

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I think we can all relate Irene...there are days when I really don't want to be diabetic lol...it takes more planning and sometimes you can be tired or lazy...we all have those days...mostly I try and have prepared stuff in the fridge and freezer to help on those days...
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I think we can all relate Irene...there are days when I really don't want to be diabetic lol...it takes more planning and sometimes you can be tired or lazy...we all have those days...mostly I try and have prepared stuff in the fridge and freezer to help on those days...
Thanks for the support d33na - preparation is a good idea - maybe i'll reserve one day to work on that and put the stuff in the freezer. Diabetes is a pain for someone used to a free life, but if you search the internet on pre -Banting and Best treatments, it is quite possible we would be dead within a year of diagnosis. So, I see the good side too.

thanks
 

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Irene, I'd be on Insulin if I ate as you do! I'm allergic to sulfa, so a whole group of meds are out in my case. I could take metformin, and if it didn't help enough, I'd have to jump to insulin. Good luck to you.

I, too, prepare for the freezer (gotta try MCS's stuffed peppers soon) and I love Optimist's crackers...loaded with cheese or peanut butter. Cream cheese is a very handy stand by for me. I keep all kinds of cheeses in my fridge...I'll bet I have ten types right now. I bake 3 lbs of bacon and keep ready in the fridge along with tons of eggs. I've just put chives in the freezer and lots of chopped basil too. (See many omelets in my future). I eat mashed cauliflower a lot too.

Berries are my only fruit. I've just bought a few tiny Grannie Smith apples and plan to test them in wedges to see if I can now eat a few bits on peanut butter on those fabulous crackers. I just remembered that I also have some frozen green grapes also in the freezer, so I lied about the fruit. In any case, so far I'm doing okay eating this way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Irene, I'd be on Insulin if I ate as you do! I'm allergic to sulfa, so a whole group of meds are out in my case. I could take metformin, and if it didn't help enough, I'd have to jump to insulin. Good luck to you.

Hi Pardart,

Perhaps I eat as I do *because* I take a high insulin dose. I think one of my medical monitors may not agree with another regarding the dose.
But when they took me in I was as high as 300 and really looked like something the cat dragged in.


I, too, prepare for the freezer (gotta try MCS's stuffed peppers soon) and I love Optimist's crackers...loaded with cheese or peanut butter. Cream cheese is a very handy stand by for me. I keep all kinds of cheeses in my fridge...I'll bet I have ten types right now. I bake 3 lbs of bacon and keep ready in the fridge along with tons of eggs. I've just put chives in the freezer and lots of chopped basil too. (See many omelets in my future). I eat mashed cauliflower a lot too.

Optimist's crackers - wow! I don't think we have them in Canada. Yeah, eggs -- i had an omellette with tomatoes for lunch - yumm!

Berries are my only fruit. I've just bought a few tiny Grannie Smith apples and plan to test them in wedges to see if I can now eat a few bits on peanut butter on those fabulous crackers. I just remembered that I also have some frozen green grapes also in the freezer, so I lied about the fruit. In any case, so far I'm doing okay eating this way.
You can freeze grapes? I will have to test that. BTW, it is chestnut season -- my absolutely favourite food and luckily they are very good for diabetics -- a bit expensive and labour intensive as they take a long time to boil.

Thanks for the tips - I will search for Optimists' cookies.

Sigh.... daily monitoring does get on my nerves sometimes.

cheers,
 

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Before I went low-carb, I always fell asleep after meals, almost in the blink of an eye. Now that there are no carbs to put me in a coma, my postprandial snooze is a thing of the past. :cool:
Me, too, but to be honest, I kind of miss my food-coma naps. :sleep:
 
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I think we can all relate Irene...there are days when I really don't want to be diabetic lol...it takes more planning and sometimes you can be tired or lazy...we all have those days...mostly I try and have prepared stuff in the fridge and freezer to help on those days...
OMG, so true. Just got back from the grocery store...as I rolled my cart up and down the aisles, I passed the bakery area and felt the most incredible lust for the fresh donuts in the display case. Calculated in my head that I *could* have one or twelve, as long as I took the six quarts of insulin it would take to offset them, but, as always, I determined - and properly so - that it wouldn't be worth it. People on here often speak of how a carb binge makes them feel crappy later on...I have not ever felt anything one way or the other regarding elevated or depressed bg levels, and that was even before I was on insulin or Metformin...but I figure a donut festival there would have prolly given me my first experience.

I'm just so freakin' happy they make s/f Jello and s/f pudding.... :dance:
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
OMG, so true. Just got back from the grocery store...as I rolled my cart up and down the aisles, I passed the bakery area and felt the most incredible lust for the fresh donuts in the display case. Calculated in my head that I *could* have one or twelve, as long as I took the six quarts of insulin it would take to offset them, but, as always, I determined - and properly so - that it wouldn't be worth it. People on here often speak of how a carb binge makes them feel crappy later on...I have not ever felt anything one way or the other regarding elevated or depressed bg levels, and that was even before I was on insulin or Metformin...but I figure a donut festival there would have prolly given me my first experience.

I'm just so freakin' happy they make s/f Jello and s/f pudding.... :dance:
Jello - good idea; a few carbs are not poisonous though. BTW my last post should have read


30

and even that is a hyperbole as for a month mostly in the high 20s. Poor people of the past must have gone through some really nasty deterioration before true hypoglycemia.
 

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BTW, it is chestnut season -- my absolutely favourite food and luckily they are very good for diabetics -- a bit expensive and labour intensive as they take a long time to boil.
Chestnut fan here too - I would cut a crosshatch and roast in the oven. Yum and no work.

Haven't tested them since diabetes dx, but nutritional info says they have about 70 gm carbs/cup - 5 gms/each. I assumed this would never fly for me, so curious what is it that makes them good for us?
 

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Jello - good idea; a few carbs are not poisonous though.
No doubt, and that's a good point to make. Gotta have SOME carbs.

But as far as I'm concerned, right now they *are* poisonous, as I'm still working my way down from a 10.1 A1c. So I'm going as low carb as I possibly can. I'll occasionally - and carefully - reintroduce some into my diet once I get my A1c down below 7.

Won't be long now... :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Chestnut fan here too - I would cut a crosshatch and roast in the oven. Yum and no work.

Haven't tested them since diabetes dx, but nutritional info says they have about 70 gm carbs/cup - 5 gms/each. I assumed this would never fly for me, so curious what is it that makes them good for us?
I am sorry I could not find the reference I read about chestnuts yesterday on the internet, Moon. Possibly, it was in one of my books; all i can recall now is that the chestnut is not high in carbohydrate or cals. but is really more like a nut, low in cholesterol and sugar and has some nutrient which i now forget. I am really sorry -- if i come across it I will post it.

:eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Hi all,

Here is a good site regarding the nutritional value of chestnuts; sorry i forgot the original post, so i am attaching it to the "Finding an Equilibrium". They are high in complex carbs.

Chestnut Nutritional Value
 
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