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I have to test multiple times a day now I am on insulin. I find it hurts to prick my ring and baby fingers but the other three are ok. So I use them predominantly. I do it around the nail edges as directed.

What fingers do you other diabetics use? Do you find that if you re-test with another finger, you get a result that varies from the first one.
 

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I started out rotating through all ten, but realized early on that my little pokes must heal instantly because they didn't hurt & I could never find where I'd tested the previous time. So now I just use my thumbs, since they're sticking out there easily accessible - I just use both sides of each thumb. Totally for convenience - no other reason! :D And I test a minimum of three times a day - sometimes closer to 8 or 10.
 

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I prick only my left fingers since I am right handed. I have never used my thumb. I am going to be testing close to 10 times per day for awhile and I decided last night that I need to start testing on both hands including thumbs. My fingertips bruise easy so I try and rotate the fingers. I have places on each finger where I have tested so much that the blood flow is heavier when pricked:hurt: You would probably get a different reading using each finger. Hopefully, the readings would be close to each other.
 

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You can get different readings even if you test twice from the very same drop of blood. I've done it before, and while it's only a few points and not enough to make a difference, you're unlikely to get the exact same number from two quick readings, regardless of what blood is used. Regulations allow that meters can have a variance of 20% either way, and that's a pretty wide stretch!
 

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I use my third, fourth, and pinkie fingers. I tried my index fingers when I first got diagnosed, but it hurt like billy-O and bruised so I don't prick them much.

Except now I have calluses on my fingers and getting blood out is like, well, getting blood out of a stone sometimes!!
 

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I use my third, fourth, and pinkie fingers. I tried my index fingers when I first got diagnosed, but it hurt like billy-O and bruised so I don't prick them much.

Except now I have calluses on my fingers and getting blood out is like, well, getting blood out of a stone sometimes!!

When you test use the side of your finger tip. A lot of the instructions show using the finger pad:nono: The pad has the MOST nerve endings (except for the tip of the tong). and as a result the most pain from testing. Using the side of the finger by the tip is much less painful.

If you do not get enough blood from the side, you may have to use the tip of the finger, but for most people the side of the end works great.
 

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Do you have any medical or scientific evidence to back up this statement? I would think there would be little if any difference.

Breeze 2 User
It's more because of variations in the meter & strips. Y'know the FDA allows a 20% variation in meters - and that's either way. So a reading of 100 could just as well be 80 or it could be 120. Mind-boggling, isn't it? Which is why we just have to pick one that's consistent with itself - maybe test it against the lab when you have bloodwork done - and hope for the best.

Now alternate site testing is a different ballgame. Using forearms, thighs or other areas will result in different readings from fingertips.

Related article:
 
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Still Have Hard Time With Different Readings..! (Somewhat Long Post)

Hi Shanny..

Not looking to argue here.. just looking to get educated seeing I'm a newbie to the "D".

Disregarding the 20% difference in readings because of strips and meter.. and everything else being equal, I still find it hard to grasp that one would get two different wide range readings from two different fingers/thumbs.

So I am lead to believe then.. if we had two identical scientific instruments that were one half of 0.0001% accurate to each other and we were to take two simultaneous readings (let us say third finger on each hand.. or pick whichever finger/thumb you want), we would still end up with two different readings (both within a point or so of each other).

Once again Shanny.. NOT looking to argue, but just to understand. I can't wrap my mind around that.

If that's really the case, then we shouldn't be testing on different fingers/thumbs. After all.. and as you said (which I understand with NO problems from that), there could be a 20% high/low reading just from the strips/meter.

So.. if as a example, we take a reading on the left hand small finger and it's 100 mg/dl (with a automatic 4 to 5% difference with readings when you change locations/fingers).. and continuing toward the right ending up with a test reading on your right hand little finger, you would then have readings of..

145 mg/dl for a upper reading.. and.. 55 mg/dl for a lower reading if both were tested together.

Would it not stand to reason for us to always use the same finger/thumb for our tests to insure we obtain the most accurate information that's available.. knowing full well that different location/finger tests are going to be erroneous?

Of course that now brings up a second, but related problem. If we have 10 different wide ranging readings, each which is from our different fingers/thumbs.. then how do we determine which one of the ten is the CORRECT reading?

You know.. I never thought having Diabetes would be this complicated! :confused2:

Breeze 2 User

P.S. My wife tells me sometimes I'm too analytical for my own good. Oh well.. it makes life interesting sometimes. ;)
 

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Are you an engineer?!!! You won't get an argument from me, that's for sure. And I use only my thumbs for testing, just because they're easy to get at. I'm lucky that my skin heals rapidly, no pain/bruising/red dots/excessive bleeding. If I can't even tell where I poked myself previously, I may as well, and fairly likely AM using the same spot! :D

But no, our blood doesn't run exactly equal throughout our bodies at any given time. Blood isn't just blood. There's arterial blood, venous blood, capillary blood. It's prob'ly all closer in glucose levels at a fasting timeframe, but postprandial there's some disparity. I'm just not enough of a scientist to know any more than that. :eek:

Hi Shanny..

Not looking to argue here.. just looking to get educated seeing I'm a newbie to the "D".

Disregarding the 20% difference in readings because of strips and meter.. and everything else being equal, I still find it hard to grasp that one would get two different wide range readings from two different fingers/thumbs.

So I am lead to believe then.. if we had two identical scientific instruments that were one half of 0.0001% accurate to each other and we were to take two simultaneous readings (let us say third finger on each hand.. or pick whichever finger/thumb you want), we would still end up with two different readings (both within a point or so of each other).

Once again Shanny.. NOT looking to argue, but just to understand. I can't wrap my mind around that.

If that's really the case, then we shouldn't be testing on different fingers/thumbs. After all.. and as you said (which I understand with NO problems from that), there could be a 20% high/low reading just from the strips/meter.

So.. if as a example, we take a reading on the left hand small finger and it's 100 mg/dl (with a automatic 4 to 5% difference with readings when you change locations/fingers).. and continuing toward the right ending up with a test reading on your right hand little finger, you would then have readings of..

145 mg/dl for a upper reading.. and.. 55 mg/dl for a lower reading if both were tested together.

Would it not stand to reason for us to always use the same finger/thumb for our tests to insure we obtain the most accurate information that's available.. knowing full well that different location/finger tests are going to be erroneous?

Of course that now brings up a second, but related problem. If we have 10 different wide ranging readings, each which is from our different fingers/thumbs.. then how do we determine which one of the ten is the CORRECT reading?

You know.. I never thought having Diabetes would be this complicated! :confused2:

Breeze 2 User

P.S. My wife tells me sometimes I'm too analytical for my own good. Oh well.. it makes life interesting sometimes. ;)
 

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What do you call "wide range"
an actual BGL of 200 could be metered as 180 Or up to 220.

If the BGL is a function of the BGL AND the work that muscles do (you know exercise lowers BGL) then the BGL will NEVER be the same in 2 different places. the blood in my left hand may have gone through a muscle that was doing more work than the blood going to my left hand. You may be measuring the blood from the same person but your NOT measuring the "same" blood

I bet your an accountant...

your never going to any living thing to be that accurate. I bet your breathing changes from one minute to the next.


Of course that now brings up a second, but related problem. If we have 10 different wide ranging readings, each which is from our different fingers/thumbs.. then how do we determine which one of the ten is the CORRECT reading?
You add the 10 reading and Davide the answer by 10

reading 1 + reading 2 + .... reading 10
______________________________
10
So.. if as a example, we take a reading on the left hand small finger and it's 100 mg/dl (with a automatic 4 to 5% difference with readings when you change locations/fingers).. and continuing toward the right ending up with a test reading on your right hand little finger, you would then have readings of..

145 mg/dl for a upper reading.. and.. 55 mg/dl for a lower reading if both were tested together.
It is NOT a compound error, but an error deviation from one point (the actual BGL reading).
 

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When you test use the side of your finger tip. A lot of the instructions show using the finger pad:nono: The pad has the MOST nerve endings (except for the tip of the tong). and as a result the most pain from testing. Using the side of the finger by the tip is much less painful.

If you do not get enough blood from the side, you may have to use the tip of the finger, but for most people the side of the end works great.
Yeah I only use the side of my finger, and I alternate a lot :) Don't think I've ever tested on the fingerpad ahaha I'm too scared to! Unnecessary pain :)
 

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(Shanny slips quietly out a side door of the "different readings" discussion, shaking her old gray befuddled head in baffled bewilderment . . .
)

Carry on, fellas . . . you're doin' fine without me!
Just keep it friendly! heheh!
 

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I use all 10, in rotation, both sides of each finger before moving on to the next.

What helps to remember which finger I'm on...I draw an outline of my hand on the sticky note pads that are about the size of an index card, I have to get creative to get the thumb outline done.

For my thumb and middle finger I have to dial up so the needle goes a bit deeper, for more easy bleeders like the baby finger I dial it down. If I forget to check the dial...ouch.

Generally I test about 5 times a day.
 
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Is it 119 mg/dl or 468 mg/dl..!?

Are you an engineer?!!!
Actually I have a formal Engineering background and was active in that for over 40 years, but retired at age 65 last August.. so now I'm living the easy life, (well kind'ah).

Diabetes86 said:
..an actual BGL of 200 could be metered as 180 Or up to 220.
So, using your ratio/percentage (which is 10%).. and taking the statement of..

BreezeOnBy said:
You would probably get a different reading using each finger.
Taking both of the above quoted statements as to their authenticity AND if a absolute 100% scientific test reading, with a accuracy of one half of 0.0001% were done on both the left and right little fingers simultaneously.. you're saying then the readings could be as high as 468 mg/dl and as low as 119 mg/dl.

Looking at the above, I'm still having a hard time grasping my mind around getting that large of a reading deviation from different fingers/thumbs if taken within a minute or so of each other.

Once again as to my second point in one of my posts, with this big of a deviation how do we know which finger/thumb is to be used on a constant basis for accuracy?

What Say You..?

Breeze 2 User
 

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Side of the left middle or ring finger...never on the tip (as in photo)
 
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