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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am 41 years old and was diagnosed with diabetes at age 17. Tough age without the added burden of managing diabetes!! I've never been very vigilan about my blood sugar control and am lucky enough to have no serious complications yet. But I know my time is coming if I don't change my ways and get things under control. Last A1C was 11.something!!! Have always been thin and in fairly good shape without having to do anything as far as exercise. I have packed on about 30-35lbs over the past 3 years due to stress, inactivity, life in general...and am serious about shedding this extra weight and getting in great shape as well as controlling my diabetes. My problem is that I never received any education about exercising with Type I and don't know how to manage food with it. So I know very little about what's happening to me - having lots of liver dump problems and spiking blood sugars after exercise. I feel like a beginner! Would love advice on getting myself back on track and/or exercising tips to avoid the liver dump. Thanks everyone and I'm so glad I found this forum!!
 

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I'm glad you found us too, sweetpea. I'm less than useless in advising you though, so I'll back out & let our T1s & our exercise enthusiasts take the floor. So happy to have you - thank you for joining us!
:welcome:
 
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welcome Sweetpea :) it's good to hear you're trying to do the right thing to improve your health. I'm type 2, dx'd in 1998, although only placed on basal and bolus insulin in Feb10. I've had bad run of health for last 4 years and to be honest I'm like you when it comes to insulin and exercise... clueless. Mainly I've noticed anytime I increase my activity level at all my BGLs can crash very quickly. It seems to me that I have to eat a lot more than I used to when I was first dx'd with diabetes. I'm now used to carrying quick acting and low acting carbs with me at all times. But I know there are type 1's on this forum that exercise regularly... they probably have some good tips. I just haven't got myself back into exercise routine because I've not been well often at all. I've been trialled on quite a few medications lately and having adverse reactions too. But seriously I'd love to be able to get a good workout, sickness is what stopped me from my regular routine in the first instance... but I wasn't on insulin at that point. I'm sure you will find plenty of support and info here. Keep us posted on how you're doing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What carbs do you carry with you? I need ideas for quick acting carbs to keep in my gym bag!

welcome Sweetpea :) it's good to hear you're trying to do the right thing to improve your health. I'm type 2, dx'd in 1998, although only placed on basal and bolus insulin in Feb10. I've had bad run of health for last 4 years and to be honest I'm like you when it comes to insulin and exercise... clueless. Mainly I've noticed anytime I increase my activity level at all my BGLs can crash very quickly. It seems to me that I have to eat a lot more than I used to when I was first dx'd with diabetes. I'm now used to carrying quick acting and low acting carbs with me at all times. But I know there are type 1's on this forum that exercise regularly... they probably have some good tips. I just haven't got myself back into exercise routine because I've not been well often at all. I've been trialled on quite a few medications lately and having adverse reactions too. But seriously I'd love to be able to get a good workout, sickness is what stopped me from my regular routine in the first instance... but I wasn't on insulin at that point. I'm sure you will find plenty of support and info here. Keep us posted on how you're doing.
 
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What carbs do you carry with you? I need ideas for quick acting carbs to keep in my gym bag!
quick acting carbs - well for me the easiest to put into my handbag are the soft lollies (maybe you call it candy?)... not sure if you have jelly babies there? but if you do... that's the sort of thing I carry with me at all times as I find they work quickly on me. I mix a variety of those sort of lollies and keep them handy at home and then I put some in a small freezer bag with a tie and pop it in my bag (make sure you've got at least 10 or more as you need up to 7 to get your BGLs up sometimes... I usually average 5 to get up 2mmoL points... check you have enough regularly). I replace them regularly so they're not stale on me... nothing worse than trying to get sugar into you and you can't chew the stuff. Also mentos lollies (chews) are good although I find them annoying as the package always breaks in my bag because I don't have to use them all the time. Another option is to get those small juice boxes and carry one of those if it's for a bigger bag or your car. But always remember you have to follow up with a low acting carb within 15 minutes if you aren't near a meal time (my endo's advice to me). So the easiest thing I find to carry is a museli bar.... but for a gym bag you could carry apples, nuts, etc... whatever really that is low GI and will give you sustained energy until your next meal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I love jelly beans, so that would be perfect. Thanks!!

quick acting carbs - well for me the easiest to put into my handbag are the soft lollies (maybe you call it candy?)... not sure if you have jelly babies there? but if you do... that's the sort of thing I carry with me at all times as I find they work quickly on me. I mix a variety of those sort of lollies and keep them handy at home and then I put some in a small freezer bag with a tie and pop it in my bag (make sure you've got at least 10 or more as you need up to 7 to get your BGLs up sometimes... I usually average 5 to get up 2mmoL points... check you have enough regularly). I replace them regularly so they're not stale on me... nothing worse than trying to get sugar into you and you can't chew the stuff. Also mentos lollies (chews) are good although I find them annoying as the package always breaks in my bag because I don't have to use them all the time. Another option is to get those small juice boxes and carry one of those if it's for a bigger bag or your car. But always remember you have to follow up with a low acting carb within 15 minutes if you're aren't near a meal time (my endo's advice to me). So the easiest thing I find to carry is a museli bar.... but for a gym bag you could carry apples, nuts, etc... whatever really that is low GI and will give you sustained energy until your next meal.
 
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I love jelly beans, so that would be perfect. Thanks!!
yep, jelly beans are perfect too as also pure glucose. For some reason I've just never liked them so much.... but I have a small pack at home which I haven't even touched. lol. Here they sell those really small packs in chemists. Funny how we're supposed to stay away from sugar... but we need it to save our lives at the same time... so have stashes of it hidden everywhere.
 

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Hi there and welcome! I am not a Dr, but here is my opinion.

For me, I try to be rather careful when exercising. I test before, often during (depending on time and intensity) and afterwards. If I am at a normal BGL, I will actually eat a couple of slices of apple while working out as the exercise will generally drop me down further. I also keep a few starbursts in my testing kit. At the gym that I work out at, I also informed the staff that I am Diabetic as I don't wear a medical alert bracelet. Exercise has so many benefits, it is certainly something you have to do, but also be careful as Type 1's tend to have some fairly wild swings. Moderate aerobic exercise is always good and maybe mix in some light strength training to work various muscles. Swimming is a great combo and works most if not all of your major muscle groups.

The way it works is, when you exercise, your body uses glucose for energy. During the first 15 minutes of working out, your body converts glycogen stored in your muscles back into glucose, and also uses the glucose circulating in your bloodstream for fuel. This causes the natural blood-glucose-lowering effect of exercise. After fifteen minutes, your body turns to the liver to convert its glycogen stockpile into glucose energy. After about thirty minutes, your cells will also begin to burn free fatty acids for fuel. Once the glycogen stores are used up, without a carb refueling in the form of food, hypoglycemia is a real danger (which is why I eat a couple of apple slices as I work out, to try to keep things balanced).

You might want to check out this article.

Taken from Type 1 DiabetesDietary Goals and Exercise - Type 1 Diabetes Health Information - NY Times Health

Because glucose levels swing dramatically during workouts, people with type 1 diabetes need to take certain precautions:

- Monitor glucose levels carefully before, during, and after workouts.
- Avoid exercise if glucose levels are above 300 mg/dL or under 100 mg/dL.
- To avoid hypoglycemia, patients should inject insulin in sites away from the muscles they use the most during exercise.
- Before exercising, avoid alcohol and if possible certain drugs, including beta-blockers, which increase the risk of hypoglycemia.
- Insulin-dependent athletes may need to decrease insulin doses or take in more carbohydrates, especially in the form of pre-exercise snacks. Skim milk is particularly helpful. They should also drink plenty of fluids.
- Good, protective footwear is essential to help avoid injuries and wounds to the feet.

Cheers!

Jeremy
 
G

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Hi there and welcome! I am not a Dr, but here is my opinion.

For me, I try to be rather careful when exercising. I test before, often during (depending on time and intensity) and afterwards. If I am at a normal BGL, I will actually eat a couple of slices of apple while working out as the exercise will generally drop me down further. I also keep a few starbursts in my testing kit. At the gym that I work out at, I also informed the staff that I am Diabetic as I don't wear a medical alert bracelet. Exercise has so many benefits, it is certainly something you have to do, but also be careful as Type 1's tend to have some fairly wild swings. Moderate aerobic exercise is always good and maybe mix in some light strength training to work various muscles. Swimming is a great combo and works most if not all of your major muscle groups.

The way it works is, when you exercise, your body uses glucose for energy. During the first 15 minutes of working out, your body converts glycogen stored in your muscles back into glucose, and also uses the glucose circulating in your bloodstream for fuel. This causes the natural blood-glucose-lowering effect of exercise. After fifteen minutes, your body turns to the liver to convert its glycogen stockpile into glucose energy. After about thirty minutes, your cells will also begin to burn free fatty acids for fuel. Once the glycogen stores are used up, without a carb refueling in the form of food, hypoglycemia is a real danger (which is why I eat a couple of apple slices as I work out, to try to keep things balanced).

You might want to check out this article.

Taken from Type 1 DiabetesDietary Goals and Exercise - Type 1 Diabetes Health Information - NY Times Health

Because glucose levels swing dramatically during workouts, people with type 1 diabetes need to take certain precautions:

- Monitor glucose levels carefully before, during, and after workouts.
- Avoid exercise if glucose levels are above 300 mg/dL or under 100 mg/dL.
- To avoid hypoglycemia, patients should inject insulin in sites away from the muscles they use the most during exercise.
- Before exercising, avoid alcohol and if possible certain drugs, including beta-blockers, which increase the risk of hypoglycemia.
- Insulin-dependent athletes may need to decrease insulin doses or take in more carbohydrates, especially in the form of pre-exercise snacks. Skim milk is particularly helpful. They should also drink plenty of fluids.
- Good, protective footwear is essential to help avoid injuries and wounds to the feet.

Cheers!

Jeremy
thanks Jeremy, this is very helpful :D obviously this would apply to me too considering I'm on full time insulin.
 

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Hello Sweetpea, welcome! This a good place to get advice for proper diabetes management. I have been type 1 for 65 years, and am very healthy.

I usually exercise very soon after a meal, so that I have carbs in my body that will prevent a liver dump and high BG. I take less bolus insulin for a meal if I am going to exercise after the meal. If I want to exercise a few hours after a meal then I have a snack to give me the needed carbs and use a partial bolus. I test before, during and after every exercise session. I carry my meter, glucose tablets and jelly beans with me everywhere I go. If I test and am a little below 100 while exercising, I eat several jelly beans. If I am below 90 I eat glucose tablets since they act very fast. How many tablets or jelly beans you should eat depends on the type of exercise you are doing, your BG level and how much insulin you have on board. Trial and error will help you make those decisions.

Richard
 

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thanks Jeremy, this is very helpful :D obviously this would apply to me too considering I'm on full time insulin.
My pleasure! Yep, this applies to anyone on insulin for sure and to a degree perhaps to many of our Type 2 friends not on insulin. Exercise over a period of time generally brings down our BGL. If one is on oral medication other than insulin, depending on the medication, there is still a chance of a Type 2 not on insulin, going hypoglycemic. Not sure about lower than around 70 (and I could be wrong on that), but even so, that is still hypo. If you are a Type 1 or a Type 2 using an insulin pump, it can get even trickier! From what I have seen, many in that situation pause their pump to avoid the potential roller coaster!

Cheers,

Jeremy
 

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Welcome!

If I can just add to the discussion of what's already been said...as a Type 1 for 28 years I finally figured out why people would pay to have those glucose tablets instead of eating candy. Well...here's my best answer; They are correctly measured (usually 4 carbs per tablet) and they do not need to be coverted (As do many other fast(ish) carbs like candy with fat and such, which takes time. So they work the fastest for hypoglycemia and are most accurate. That's just a tip for the lows. But definately don't give up on exercise! I use it instead of insulin whenever possible, lowering my BG after a meal or to correct a high (as long as it is not too high as was mentioned). Ther's nothing like a nice long walk on a sun shiny day!
 
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