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My name is Ellen and I live in Cheyenne, Wyoming. Five years ago, after experiencing T2 diabetic symptoms and being diagnosed with metabolic syndrome and prediabetic blood sugars, I got scared or mad enough to start making a connection between what I ate and how I felt. That sent me off on a journey which has culminated in being 2 months away from finishing a Masters in Applied Clinical Nutrition and writing 3 websites on nutrition to share what I learned with others.

One of those sites is all about ketogenic diets, and how the diet can be used to treat illnesses ranging from acid reflux to cancer. I wrote a book on fighting cancer with a ketogenic diet which has now sold in over 54 countries, but my goal is to focus on helping people with insulin resistance, mets, prediabetes and diabetes. I am now in the process of writing a book on how to manage diabetes with a ketogenic diet.

I joined because I want to understand how others have handled a diagnosis of diabetes, and what obstacles to health were encountered. I also hope to be able to contribute information about ketogenic diets to anyone who is interested or has questions.
 

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We are very aware of the LCHF and ketogenic ways-of-eating, and if you had read any of our threads before jumping in with both feet, you'd already know that. While we don't promote any specific method apart from eat-to-your-meter, we do suggest that these are what works for a great many of us.

I feel obliged to mention though, that if you are here to promote your own ideas, books, websites, etc., please spare us. Our rules specifically prohibit professionals from identifying themselves and giving advice. Rule #12
 

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Hello Shanny, yes I am aware and impressed at the knowledge about the effect of diet I've seen on this forum. It was one of the reasons I decided to join. I thought it would be a place where I could fit in. In addition, I was asked to introduce myself, so I did, and what I wrote is what I'm proud to share with others. It was not my intention to be "a professional" only to share as you all are sharing. I get the feeling I've offended you somehow by being who I am. I can't stop being who I am or stop knowing what I know, and I'm disappointed that I am being judged as a troll without anyone even giving me a chance.
 

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By introduction, one normally shares their A1C and blood sugar upon diagnosis of diabetes or pre-diabetes. Generally it is felt that the notion of pre-diabetes is in error unless verified by a C-Peptide test for insulin activity prior to a failed A1C and fasting blood sugar. It would be nice to 'know' you as a person. You are obviously passionate about how beneficial and lifesaving is the ketogenic diet. That, in and of itself, is very forward-thinking, and you are to be commended. We are here to encourage each other on our journey, to share what works for us personally. If you would like to share that, it would be great.

It's nice that you cared enough to write books that would inform the public, but we really just want to know about you and your personal experience with diabetes. That's what we are here for. That's why you should be here. Respectfully, etc.
 

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Thanks Bree, I appreciate your explanation and thoughts. My last HbA1c was 5.5 and my blood sugars are normal.. they run about 85 in the mornings, and around 75 in the afternoon, depending on if I've talked myself out of eating some dark chocolate. I avoid grain like the plague but chocolate is still in the picture. Maybe I'll finally kick it out of my diet, maybe not. Jury is out at this point.

Making the dietary changes I've made over the past 5 years I think helped me avoid full blown T2. My mother and grandmother were T2s and my boyfriend is a T2 as well. My mother died early from the complications of diabetes, and it's my intention to avoid that myself, and help others avoid it if I can. The advice I see coming from the ADA just infuriates me. It's heartening to me to see so many people here are aware of better ways of managing blood sugar.
 

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Bree has stated it very well - if you wish to 'fit in' here, she has explained how it works. All you've told us is your accomplishments - nothing about yourself. If you are not here to educate us, then why was it necessary to tell us how near you are to having a Masters in Applied Clinical Nutrition? I was simply reminding you of the forum rules which explicitly state
If you are a medical professional, do not use diabetesforum.com to distribute professional medical advice and/or promote your services.
and it sounds to me like you are a medical professional.
 

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Shanny,
I would imagine from what I've seen here that you, Bree and many others are probably as knowledgeable as I am about ketogenic diets, so I don't see how my having a degree in nutrition is anything more than my accomplishment. I don't plan on giving medical advice to anyone, I just want to understand and participate in the community.
 

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Just so we understand each other - you are no more of an expert than anyone else here. Others of us are also certified in various fields of expertise, but you won't find the others identifying themselves.

We have one other condition, if it could be called that, which is we are very particular about people positing a cure. If you are controlling your diabetes with the ketogenic way-of-eating, we're delighted, but we will not tolerate any noise about you having been cured.
 

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Thanks Bree, I appreciate your explanation and thoughts. My last HbA1c was 5.5 and my blood sugars are normal.. they run about 85 in the mornings, and around 75 in the afternoon, depending on if I've talked myself out of eating some dark chocolate. I avoid grain like the plague but chocolate is still in the picture. Maybe I'll finally kick it out of my diet, maybe not. Jury is out at this point.

Making the dietary changes I've made over the past 5 years I think helped me avoid full blown T2. My mother and grandmother were T2s and my boyfriend is a T2 as well. My mother died early from the complications of diabetes, and it's my intention to avoid that myself, and help others avoid it if I can. The advice I see coming from the ADA just infuriates me. It's heartening to me to see so many people here are aware of better ways of managing blood sugar.
I know how you feel. I am beyond infuriated at what the ADA is doing. I can't even describe how with you on this I am currently. I just lost another aunt to this dreadful disease,.. a death that could have been prevented had she known about the ketogenic diet years ago.

I can't tell you how sorry I am that you lost your mother at all, let alone to diabetes. I lost my mother, as well (non-diabetes related), way too soon. That your mother was lost to diabetes is understandably infuriating. It's not just hurtful, it's just downright criminal. Please accept my deepest and most sincere condolences. I can understand why it is you are so passionate about this now. Please be at ease and tell us how you eat.. How many carbs do you allow yourself daily? What are your macros? If you were to return to the SAD diet, what do you think your blood sugars would look like?

It has been argued that an A1C over 5.4% should be considered diabetic instead of the less strict 5.6%. I'm traveling with a nurse this weekend as a translator to educate Hispanic Catholics about diabetes, help with screenings, etc.. But her info states that anything above a 6.5% is diabetic. I'm trying to hold my tongue because the screenings are important, but it's tough. It's my first time so I'm not sure what to do. Currently, I'm writing a cookbook for my diabetes-ridden family in the hopes that they will save themselves and the next generation from diabetes. Let's hope it helps.

As for chocolate, it's a good thing that I was able to make the transition to Belgian Dark Chocolate and be satisfied with a small piece rather than an entire bar or two of carb-infested milk chocolate with nugget and caramel. Ha! It's suppose to increase dopamine levels, has great manganese, decent iron,.. :D Tastebuds do change, thankfully, on the ketogenic diet. But, the taste for chocolate, for some reason, just never goes away completely for me.

Those are amazing blood sugars. I can't tell you how wonderful it is that you stopped diabetes in its tracks. I wish there were more people like you. It's such an easy fix. And it's only food, right?
 

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Bree, I'm sorry to hear about your aunt and your mom. You have my condolences as well. There are so many diseases over which we have very little control, but controlling blood sugar is doable. It is just senseless when anyone and especially someone we love, doesn't get the information they need to keep long term complications from becoming an issue. The ADA really needs to wake up. I would be completely stressed following that nurse around. The cookbook is a great idea.. when you are done, I hope you announce it. I would love to see it.

I eat low carb on most days, and when I don't, I'm reminded very quickly why I stick with low carb. Some days I stay under 30 carbs, other days I might get close to 80 for the day. Going much over 80 makes me feel awful, my FBS gets into the 100-110 range. If I notice night time hypoglycemia, then I know I'm way off track. That happens very rarely now.

When I'm really diligent, and also watch my protein intake, my blood sugars can drop into the high 60s in the afternoon, with ketones in the 2.0 range.

Breakfast is usually bacon and eggs. Lunch and dinner are usually meat with some kind of vegetable. Lately, I've been on a taco kick.. I found a gluten free taco mix at Walmart with no junk in it. I fry up some onions and garlic, throw in a pound of 80/20 ground beef, add some green chilis, and eat it straight of the skillet with sour cream, some diced tomatoes and shredded Colby jack. Snacks include cheese, nuts, smoked salmon and cream cheese.

And don't forget, chocolate has magnesium too, and lots of antioxidants, etc. etc.. there's always a good reason it should stay in my diet. : )
 

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Bugellen, I hate to say it, but I got so SICK of bacon and eggs. I even got sick of dinners for breakfast. I got sick of all forms of Keto pancakes for breakfast. I got sick of Keto Cheesecake and Chocolate Pecan Fudge for breakfast. So, I went to work in the kitchen and came up with Keto cereal a la Optimist style and the best coffee cake squares I've ever tasted. Yum!!! I'm sure I will get sick of that, as well. :D

Your blood sugars are extraordinary. I, too, was freed of all meds with the ketogenic diet. I constantly say that this place just saved my life. I just wish I can share it effectively with my family. I wish they would listen. I'm going to follow this nurse around on Sunday and I'm going to cringe and try to not yell, "Sacrilege!" Heh.. I'm not quite sure how I'm going to handle it, or if it's even a good idea. Who knows,.. maybe if I spend enough time with her (she is doing this for her PhD in Public Health) I can win her over. She seems genuine, so I don't see why not.

It's rather amazing that you became a nutritionist. Your curriculum must have been horrific; I know what they preach, and make no mistake, I have found most of them to border on being cultish. My daughter is in medical school and they garbage they tote in her Nutrition class is infuriating. And they are the first to say that it is not based in fact, I kid you not.

Very well on the cookbook. My daughter says that when she becomes a doctor in a couple of years that she will give it to all of her diabetic patients. Ha!


Stay strong, Bugellen. Keep those blood sugars down. I know it gets hard sometimes to tow the keto line. The message is getting out there thanks to passionate and caring people like yourself. Just remember, you come first, way before those you try to help. Take care of you.
 

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Thanks Bree. I've gotten really good at defending myself in school discussions on IR, MEtS and diabetes.. I just reference everything I say and the naysayers stop talking. I've had professors with PhDs try to tell me that carbs are essential nutrients. I just roll my eyes and move on.

Good luck with the nurse, and congratulations to your daughter for persevering in Med school. And thanks again for the welcome, I truly appreciate the chance to participate.
 

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I haven't been reading this thread because of the title "former diabetic: It's a wonderful read and I'm glad I found it. But . . . once a diabetic , always a diabetic. I'm proof of it because I like you were diagnosed with low numbers . . . have to add the diabetes showed up with hyperthyroidism as well. That being said 20 years later I'm injecting insulin 4 times a day. So keep on keeping on forever.
 

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I haven't been reading this thread because of the title "former diabetic: It's a wonderful read and I'm glad I found it. But . . . once a diabetic , always a diabetic. I'm proof of it because I like you were diagnosed with low numbers . . . have to add the diabetes showed up with hyperthyroidism as well. That being said 20 years later I'm injecting insulin 4 times a day. So keep on keeping on forever.
Thank you Roxanne for sharing that. It's a good reminder to me to never say never.
 

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Hi and welcome, Bugellen. You and I are about the same place metabolically. I'm prediabetic, too, and doing everything possible, with a ketogenic Paleo diet to keep from progressing along the diabetic and Alzheimer's pathway.

And I so agree about the diabetic professionals!

Bree, maybe if you make a point of checking your BG during the trip, your nurse friend will see how your diet is keeping it under good control. Are you going to be able to find good food to eat on the trip?
 

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Hi and welcome, Bugellen. You and I are about the same place metabolically. I'm prediabetic, too, and doing everything possible, with a ketogenic Paleo diet to keep from progressing along the diabetic and Alzheimer's pathway.

And I so agree about the diabetic professionals!

Bree, maybe if you make a point of checking your BG during the trip, your nurse friend will see how your diet is keeping it under good control. Are you going to be able to find good food to eat on the trip?
Thanks Janknitz.
Ellen
 

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Hi, Ellen --

I'm new around here, too. I was gestationally diabetic with my last two pregnancies -- one in 1989/'90 and the last one in 2005/'06. (I had my last baby boy just weeks before I turned 41.)

I can tell you that the standard of care changed *completely* within those 16 years. With my middle son, born 12/1990, I was told to eat *no sugar,*, scooted off to a RD's office who basically said to eat more veggies and *no sugar* and sent me on my way. No testing, except for what I would get in the doc's office during my prenatal appointments, and definitely no further advice on how things were going with my DX.

With my last son (biggest, best surprise of my life but also the cause of a metabolic meltdown of my entire endocrine system) I was given a meter, strips, a "diabetes management team", non-stress tests, the whole nine yards.

But still, I was told to eat 45 grams of carbs for my 3 meals per day and 15 grams in 2 snacks. Is it any wonder I ended up on insulin? We actually *celebrated* my getting down to a 7% A1C. <shudders>

With my personal GD history and my familial history -- which is rife with impaired glucose tolerance -- I was told I would have a 75% chance of having diabetes within 10 years of my son's birth. But as I was told here already, once the wolf is in the door, it's a done deal. It's how YOU deal with it that matters the most.

I have found a doctor that embraces the ketogenic diet as a management tool and she actually listens to me. (You wouldn't believe the horrified stares I got from previous professionals when I suggested 20-30g of carbs was what I ate for the day.)

I got lucky. But I am also taking the bull by the horns, as it were, and taking care of myself proactively rather than reactively. (After a spectacular pity party that lasted for 2 years.) It sounds like you're a very proactive person yourself!

I wanted you to know all that before I say welcome. So, welcome! There are a lot of very warm, knowledgeable people here.
 
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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Hello Margilowry, thank you for your thoughts. I'm so glad to hear you found a physician that is supportive. I was reading a blog today in which people shared how they were diagnosed and treated after diagnosis and I was just appalled at how some of them were just let loose from the doctor's office with no direction and no one to help. How are people supposed to know what to do or even where to start looking? Not to mention being in a state of shock at the same time. I know doctors are busy, but sheez, that's not right. But maybe it IS worse to get bad information.

And believe me, I get those stares and stoney looks and worse all the time, so I'm not surprised.
 

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Hi and welcome, Bugellen. You and I are about the same place metabolically. I'm prediabetic, too, and doing everything possible, with a ketogenic Paleo diet to keep from progressing along the diabetic and Alzheimer's pathway.

And I so agree about the diabetic professionals!

Bree, maybe if you make a point of checking your BG during the trip, your nurse friend will see how your diet is keeping it under good control. Are you going to be able to find good food to eat on the trip?
Oh, I am bringing my 4 carb coffee cake creation. :D As for eating out, when necessary, I just order a salad of some sort, perhaps some grilled chicken or salmon. I used to be so nervous when I was first diagnosed, but I'm no longer in the least tempted by carby food, and I had to learn how to order in a pinch. For dessert, I usually bring my own, something easy to carry and delicious. Most anything goes well with coffee.. :) It's all about the company, right? It's people who matter, not food. Don't get me wrong, I love delicious food, but 'time and a place'. Truly, I am loving life these days, as it pertains to food, anyway. :)

And good idea on checking BGs! I'm going to bring my labs over the last two years, as well. Although that might be overkill. We'll see. I think she will be open.
 

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Hello Margilowry, thank you for your thoughts. I'm so glad to hear you found a physician that is supportive. I was reading a blog today in which people shared how they were diagnosed and treated after diagnosis and I was just appalled at how some of them were just let loose from the doctor's office with no direction and no one to help. How are people supposed to know what to do or even where to start looking? Not to mention being in a state of shock at the same time. I know doctors are busy, but sheez, that's not right. But maybe it IS worse to get bad information.

And believe me, I get those stares and stoney looks and worse all the time, so I'm not surprised.
Oh, I received the whole nine yards with a nutritionist to boot! The nutritionist told me that I would die on the ketogenic diet and called for a full out hospital intervention. It was... a nightmare. But, they couldn't argue with the numbers. From a 10.6 A1C and a fasting of 317 to what they consider normal blood sugars within a few weeks? There was no arguing. My next A1C was 5.0 four months later, then I was in the 4s.
 
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