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"Free Fatty Acids and Cytokines Induce Pancreatic ß-Cell Apoptosis by Different Mechanisms."

Here is an interesting article from the blog of "Carb Sane" (Evelyn Kocur).

Hypercaloric diets containing large amounts of fat, also called the Western diet, contribute to a major extent to the increasing prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). T2DM is characterized by peripheral insulin resistance, pancreatic ß-cell dysfunction, and decreased ß-cell mass associated with increased rates of ß-cell apoptosis. Elevated levels of circulating free fatty acids (FFAs) contribute to the pathogenesis of T2DM. High concentrations of FFAs lead to both impairment of insulin action and ß-cell dysfunction. Moreover, FFAs have been shown to cause ß -cell death, mainly by apoptosis.
Read on, it is interesting.

Regards,
Rad
 

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OK, so the villian is a high-carb/high-fat or "western" diet. It seems we are left to assume a connection between the fat part of that and high FFAs and NEFAs in the blood. But, is this true? Looking around, I found this:

I’ve looked more into Dr. Ravnskov’s work and started an email exchange with him, his replies (to my NEFA/FFA/markers-to-look-for questions) are below:

“High serum levels of NEFA/FFA are most of all seen in people who eat much carbohydrates. All carbs are converted to glucose in the body and if you do not use the excess glucose, for instance by exercizing, glucose is either converted to glycogen, or, if the glycogen depots are full, to FFA”
and

Excessive accumulation of triacylglycerol fatty acids (obesity) is associated with an increased risk of insulin resistance, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension.
A nearly universal feature of "non-Western" diets which involved increasing natural fats ( but with eliminating excessive PUFAs and trans-fats) and decreasing carbohydrates is large decreases in circulating FFAs and triglycerides.

I rather doubt if a diet which is "high-carb and high-fat" has much relevance to most of the people on this list. On the other hand if you compare diets with relatively more fat and less carbohydrates you will find improvement in most measures, especially the ones mentioned in the article. Triglycerides and HDL stand out as the clearest winners.
 
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