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Hi All,

I just wanted a little clarification from the real experts...

In your experience, can you say whether or not fructose (by itself, not talking about HFCS here) causes an insulin response or ups BG? I've read things from "experts" saying yes it does and no it doesn't. Not sure what to believe now. :confused:
 

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In short: Fructose is a monosaccharide or simplest form of sugar (as is Glucose). It does not raise Blood Glucose because it is not Glucose...

BUT it can be rapidly stored by the Liver as Glycogen (animal starch). And Glycogen can be released from the Liver as Glucose. So while foods rich in Fructose may not have an immediate BG effect -- and as such tend to have lower Glycemic Index (GI) values -- Fructose can lead to an overall increase in available BG over the next few hours/days... so you may not see a BG spike if you eat pure Fructose, but you may have an increased DP the next morning.

...AND as outlined in the presentations above, it may have some nasty effects (similar to alcohol) along the way.

Dr Lustig describes it as a dose-dependant hepato-toxin. Just like alcohol, a small amount may be harmless -- maybe even beneficial -- but above a certain threshold and it is poison.
 
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I think Frank hit the nail on the head. Many of us don't see an immediate spike but rather it contributes to higher morning fastings and liver dumps. The only fruit I tend to eat is a few berries once in awhile.
 

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AS I understand it Fructose goes into the blood and does the same thing as Glucose, including all the bad stuff we get from high BG. the bad part is our meters do NOT read fructose. so if you eat a lot of fruit you will have elevated fructose in your blood doing bad things and it wont register on your meter.
 

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I made a discovery the other night in regards to fructose. Was feeling crappy, so I took some liquid Nyquil. Took a bath, got out and into bed. I checked my bsl about an hour later and it had shot up to 185! When we read the label we discovered it has high fructose corn syrup in it - never realized...especially since it tastes so horrid!

Sent from TDH :)
 

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Since I had been having a mad craving for some California Medjool dates, I used this thread as an excuse. As I understand it, they contain 15g of fructose in a single date. I don't believe they contain sucrose or any other sugars.

So, I caved and ate TWO for approximately 30g of fructose. I tested at just under an hour (presumably "peak") and got 133 - not terribly high, but way above anything I ever see day to day.

This morning, I woke up at 79, probably right on or a little lower than my recent average.

Not really the result I expected from what I've read about fructose. I thought it would go straight to glycogen (since I normally have very little), produce little short-range effects and come out at dawn.
 

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Search the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference...

It shows a single 24g "Medjool Date" as (among other things) 8.08g Glucose and 7.67g Fructose.

Are there any natural foods which are only Fructose?

Sucrose (like HFCS) is a disaccharide made up of Glucose + Fructose

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So for 2 dates you are looking at 16.17g Glucose, 15.34g Fructose, 0.25g Sucrose (Glucose + Fructose), and 0.14g Maltose (Glucose + Glucose).
 

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Search the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference...

It shows a single 24g "Medjool Date" as (among other things) 8.08g Glucose and 7.67g Fructose.

Are there any natural foods which are only Fructose?

Sucrose (like HFCS) is a disaccharide made up of Glucose + Fructose

---

So for 2 dates you are looking at 16.17g Glucose, 15.34g Fructose, 0.25g Sucrose (Glucose + Fructose), and 0.14g Maltose (Glucose + Glucose).
That would certainly make more sense. I read somewhere that a single medjool date contained 15g of fructose and the package said each one contains 16g of "sugars" (32g in two) so it led me to believe that that sugars were almost entirely fructose. The breakdown you provided is consistent with my results, though.

I wonder if I can get away with a single one once in a while without stoking my glycogen and ruining everything?

One of the very few foods I really miss!
 

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So, I caved and ate TWO for approximately 30g of fructose. I tested at just under an hour (presumably "peak") and got 133 - not terribly high, but way above anything I ever see day to day.

This morning, I woke up at 79, probably right on or a little lower than my recent average.
Again your meter does not read the Fructose in your blood, so you have no idea what your true blood sugar level is. you know the blood Glucose level
 

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Again your meter does not read the Fructose in your blood, so you have no idea what your true blood sugar level is. you know the blood Glucose level
That's not what I meant. I was curious about the spike for this very reason (I thought it was all fructose) and also curious about the low morning number since I had read that fructose highly tends to get turned into glycogen. When I have glycogen stored up, my morning numbers are higher.

Also, I don't believe fructose - to the extent it is ever in the blood - participates in glycation, does it? My understanding is that it pretty much goes direclty to the liver where various things can happen to it such as becoming fat droplets, or stored as glycogen - and I'm not sure what else.
 

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...I don't believe fructose - to the extent it is ever in the blood - participates in glycation, does it? ...
I understood that Fructose has a greater effect (up to 10 times?) on the creation of AGEs than Glucose does?

David Mendosa discusses it here... http://www.mendosa.com/blog/?p=225
 

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I found a very interesting article on fructose on about.com

I also did a lot of research on agave (mentioned in the article fgummett cited) and found earlier positive tests for fructose were revised because of poor testing methods.
The sweet stuff in agave is inulin, which the original tests confused for fructose.
 
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