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I am diabetic from 17 yrs and an insulin dependent off late i am feeling like a burning sensation on my right foot why is this
 

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Sounds like it could be the beginnings of neuropathy. How controlled are your blood sugars? I know if I let mine go much above 120 I get some neuropathy in feet and legs.
 
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get yourself to a doc if you can and get it checked out... a podiatrist is a good idea considering they are foot docs.
 

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A neurologist can diagnose nerve damage of all kinds. My neurologist used an EMG test and diagnosed my neuropathy, about 10 years ago. When I started using very strict control and had less high blood sugar my symptoms disappeared. Having stable control and as few highs as possible is the best thing you can do to help your neuropathy.

Richard
 

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Been There, Done That!

Neuropathy would be my first guess, too! That is exactly how mine began 14 years ago. And while I agree that "tight blood sugar control" is important, it doesn't stop neuropathy. At the most, it will slow it down.

My sugars have always been extremely tight. Until about 16 months, when they moved to me both fast acting and long acting insulin, and I still had what my neurologist termed as rapid onset neuropathy. In other words, once it took iIt took off like a just leaving the municipal airport.

Richard is correct in telling you that only nerve conduction tests can identify the culprit, but, in my case it took nearly four years (after the burning, electrical shock sensations, and pain) of tests to identify the neuropathy.

During that time, my Workers Comp Insurance company and doctors tried to claim it was all in my head. In one they were correct. Neuropathy is in the head, as it is the brain that receives the message from those nerve endings (on the top, bottom and sides) in the feet that tell the brain what kind of sensation to feel, and how bad that sensation is. :eek:

Try using Zolstrik. It is an OTC cream, and as long as you are not allegoric to really hot peppers. It works wonders, especially in the beginning. The hot peppers trick your nerve and brain to feel something different, and it really does negate the sensations and pain.

Good luck, my fellow sufferer, this is an extremely debilitating disease!

Pastor Paul :)
 
G

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Neuropathy would be my first guess, too! That is exactly how mine began 14 years ago. And while I agree that "tight blood sugar control" is important, it doesn't stop neuropathy. At the most, it will slow it down.

My sugars have always been extremely tight. Until about 16 months, when they moved to me both fast acting and long acting insulin, and I still had what my neurologist termed as rapid onset neuropathy. In other words, once it took iIt took off like a just leaving the municipal airport.

Richard is correct in telling you that only nerve conduction tests can identify the culprit, but, in my case it took nearly four years (after the burning, electrical shock sensations, and pain) of tests to identify the neuropathy.

During that time, my Workers Comp Insurance company and doctors tried to claim it was all in my head. In one they were correct. Neuropathy is in the head, as it is the brain that receives the message from those nerve endings (on the top, bottom and sides) in the feet that tell the brain what kind of sensation to feel, and how bad that sensation is. :eek:

Try using Zolstrik. It is an OTC cream, and as long as you are not allegoric to really hot peppers. It works wonders, especially in the beginning. The hot peppers trick your nerve and brain to feel something different, and it really does negate the sensations and pain.

Good luck, my fellow sufferer, this is an extremely debilitating disease!

Pastor Paul :)
that's so annoying when docs think it's just in your head.
Speaking of nerve pain... all the ladies in my family, including myself have this supposedly unknown phenomenon in our big toe joints... it burns really bad periodically and very bad pain and goes bright red. We all have to pick & choose our shoes to not aggravate our big toe joints. I've asked my doc several times (so have the rest of the ladies in my family) and I just get "oh it's probably a pinched nerve, just rub some anti-inflammitory gel on it". None of us in the family have had an answer from any of our docs. My poor aunt now one of her toe joints starting to get rigid on her... but they claim it's not arthritis either. hmmmm. Perhaps it could be a form of neuropathy? But not all the ladies are diabetic... although quite a few are... but it's even affecting the ladies who don't have diabetes. The men in the family are fine and don't have this trouble, none of them have diabetes either. Must be a genetic thing.
 
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