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Discussion Starter #1
My True Result meter is indicating it's time for recalibration. When I got the meter, it came with a vial of glucose control solution. Last time it needed recalibration, I had to special order a vial for $8, and it was only a "level 1"--apparently there are three different ones you're supposed to use?

What gives? Where can I get the glucose test solution and do I really have to pay that much for what is essentially a single drop for one time use since they expire once you open them?

I think it would be cheaper just to get a new meter at this point.
 

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I used it once. The range of what is considered okay is so broad as to be almost worthless. Fortunately, I had called the manufacturer (Abbot) when I suspected a problem and they sent me a free solution, plus more strips.

In the end it turned out to be "operator error".
 

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All the nurse practitioners I ever talked to told me that the test solution was an unnecessary expense.
 

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I have a sealed never opened bottle of Level 1, expires 7/31/15.

I bought 2 of the True meters and found them to be highly inaccurate on me and reading 10-30 points too low. I retired them and have a "new" bottle of test solution from one of the meters.
 
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I don't understand the purpose of these test solution. And why use the word "recalibration"? There isn't any way to recalibrate them, is there?

I have an extremely inaccurate but brand new meter. Even if I had test solution, what could I do to fix it?
 

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I don't understand the purpose of these test solution. And why use the word "recalibration"? There isn't any way to recalibrate them, is there?

I have an extremely inaccurate but brand new meter. Even if I had test solution, what could I do to fix it?
I believe the test solution is actually a manufacturer solution to complaints the the meters may be highly inaccurate when first used or tested. It's a way the ultimate consumer can verify for themselves that the gauge falls within the accuracy parameters of the vendor.

You can't fix it, calibrate it, and if the test solution verifies it's working as it should, you probably can't return it or even complain to customer service.
 

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As I see it, the only thing "control solution" offers is a check that the meter is performing within acceptable parameters and Nick's final sentence sums it up. If it ain't broke (and we the manufacturer define "broke"), don't expect us to fix it!!

In the UK, you can phone Roche and they will send you a bottle. For some reason, that service isn't on offer in France - so I've never had a chance to play with it - sad :(
 

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As I'm reading Dr Bernsteins book it strikes me as one of the most important things: making sure your blood meter is giving you accurate readings. If I do two tests one after another on either of my two machines I get slightly different results. If you think about it, getting tight control is impossible without an accurate machine.
 

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Tight control IS possible if you take the meter numbers for what they are - not spot-on accurate, but portraying trends & patterns. Gotta see the whole forest - not just one tree.
 

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Well, I don't think anyone needs to pay for test solution. From what I'm reading, it looks like 1 gram of pure glucose in a liter of water should read exactly 100.

Should be pretty easy and cheap to make it yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thank everybody. I think the consensus is "don't bother." I'm fine with that--I usually take my meter to the lab when I get my FBG and take it with my meter immediately after. If they are not close, then I would question the accuracy of my meter, but so far, they have been within a few points.

I'm grateful I'm not insulin dependent! The range of accuracy would drive me bonkers if I had to depend on meter readings to titrate insulin doses. Sheesh! My hat is off to those of you who do. As a pre-diabetic, it's the trends that interest me the most. So I need to remember to be less anal about this and just relax.

I played one time by testing the same blood sample twice in rapid succession and got pretty different readings, just barely in the range. ARRGH. I hate numbers because they are just not as precise as they are supposed to be!
 

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Nothing personal, Janknitz, but I think you are winding up your rubber band needlessly.

Our meters, are not, never were, and probably never will be, laboratory instruments ... they are a (comparatively) inexpensive tool which greatly helps us in the day-today managing of our diabetes.

I haven't a clue to the actual cost of producing a meter, such as we use, but considering the rate at which they give them away, it must not be much.

Accuracy and precision get me as excited as they probably do you, but we just have to accept the fact that our data are going to be meter-limited, and put the data to the best possible use, in spite of those limitations.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Accuracy and precision get me as excited as they probably do you, but we just have to accept the fact that our data are going to be meter-limited, and put the data to the best possible use, in spite of those limitations.
LOL, they don't get me excited, I just wish things were accurate and precise. Even medical laboratory tests don't seem to be very reliable--how can I let someone treat me with medications with serious side effects if the data is so suspect???? (Not BG in particular, but some other values). Part of this is tied up in the fact that Kaiser rarely does complete testing so that a whole picture emerges.
 
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