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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone! I'm 29 years old and a Type I for already 15 years. I work as a school teacher, I'm from Moscow, Russia and it's the first time I'm registered at the English-speaking forum about diabetes.

Not long ago I was told that I've got some complications and that was really tough. I can't say that my glucose level was always excellent, but I was trying to avoid complications and I think that the thing is I was trying too hard sometimes - thing I've got hypoglycemia unawareness or kind of it so low blood sugar has influenced my vessels and that caused retinopathy. So now I'm trying to cope with it and hope that this forum is full of useful information and also will be a kind of encouragement for me.

And please try to keep your glucose level normal cause our relatives need and love us!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Diabetic retinopathy is usually caused by hyperglycemia, or so I believe. What kind of levels do you maintain ?
Hi, now for about three months I try to keep to bgs like from 4mmol/l to 9, but before that it was not so good. It was quite high, sometimes up to 20 mmol/l :( but as I check the condition of my eyes one or twice a year I know there were no such problems before, but now there are changes and my ophthalmologist believes that's because of not only highs but also because my lows. The number of lows increased as I started to make my bgs better and this great difference in the bgs is the reason.

And yes, I've always thought of hyperglycemia to be the cause of DP.

Well, anyway now I try not to have highs and lows and in a week I'm seeing my eye doctor again to check the situation and decide whether I need lazer coagulation (don't know if the name of this procedure is the same in your country, but hope you know what I mean).
 

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Well, medically my country is pretty advanced and cheap too. We get many people come here for treatment which would be pretty expensive in their own country.

Normally, as a practice I do not respond to queries by T1s because I believe that T1 & T2 are completely different diseases with somewhat similar symptoms.

Do you take 2 different insulins to cover for your basal & bolus needs or are you on a mixed insulin regimen ? I'm sure your dosage has been titrated / calibrated by your doctor, why then the wild swings ?
 

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Welcome to the forum.

I'm sure this retinopathy you've developed is very scary.

My comment is that BGs over 7.8mmol/L or 140 mg/dl will set you up for complications. Getting your BG below that, and preferably below 6.7/120 will go a long way in helping to keep you from developing more complications, and may help reduce your problems. There have been comments from diabetics on this forum who were able to reverse complications by keeping their BGs low and stable.

One way that one can keep from having highs and lows is to drastically reduce the starches/carbohydrates in the diet. This keeps BG from spiking, and also requires less insulin, so there's less chance of a low. Many T1s on this forum have reduced their total daily carbohydrates to less than 100g, some as low as 30g - that's per day.
 

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Welcome to the forum, we are so glad you found us. I think you will find some useful information here and lots of friendly folks to point you in the right area if you can't find what you're looking for.
 
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Hello from California!
Both sides of my Grandparents came from Russia:)
Sorry to hear about your complications. I do not have type 1 but my Mother does. For us, we were not equipped with enough good information from our doctor and she was told to eat a standardized "healthy" diet full of whole grains. The dietitian said she could eat whatever, as long as she bolused for it. But, noticed she couldn't just eat whatever and take a shot to "cover" it--this included the "healthy" whole grains they kept telling us we MUST have. The insulin did not act in the same sequence with the meals they were touting as diabetic friendly. She would have to do correction doses hours after her "healthy" meals. When we figured out she had to go on a low carb eating plan, her numbers stabilized.
We also had to figure out her insulin-to-carb ratio. Here is a good article on that: Insulin-to-Carb Ratios
She also had these extreme highs in the early AMs. So, the doctor told us to split her basal dose in two. One dose in the morning and one dose for the evening. Had to monitor her blood sugar and noticed she was now getting lows in the morning. She had to slightly reduce her evening basal dose. That seemed to fix it.

She is now on an insulin pump and her latest A1C is 5.6--Not sure how to convert that to European levels.
We concluded this mostly to the low carb "diet". The insulin pump helped also because you get to program different basal rates for different hours of the day.

This is a book that also helped us: "Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes Solution: The Complete Guide to Achieving Normal Blood Sugars".
Glad you are trying to get your numbers stabilized. Hope to see you around the forum:) The more heads we have around, the more wisdom we have to spread and help others.
Take care!
 

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Welcome to our chatty little group. I must tell you your English is superb. I'm a type 2 it seems, but I can tell you that you are getting good advice. Complications it is said come when our BG runs over 140, so even if you need what I believe you calling something else that we call lazer treatment to solve your problem now, you'll need to bring it down to that level and keep it there.
I wish you all the luck in the world on your journey. Losing eyesight is one of my fears...so, I understand your feelings. So glad you joined us.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks everyone! I'll try to give all the answers in one message (sorry if I miss smth)
1) I take 2 different insulins - Novorapid normaly 3 times a day or more if I need to low my high bgs or when I have a snack. And Levemir twice a day - 10U in the morning and 6U before going to bed. I coordinate it with my endo but the problemof the swings is because of sports and work all together.When I swim in the pool I can't measure the exact influence it gives to my bgs - some times I swim more active or just longer. I have to eat something before hand and I'mnot always very correct about it so it turns into low bgs results. And also at work when some children come upto me and start asking questionsI can simply forget to eat on time or (what is worse) to make my Novorapid injection(
2) I was a bit surprised to know about eating less than 40g of carbs a day - it's kind of not very popular among our endos - they say that normally an adult should eat 150 and more carbs a day!) And I think that I'lltry to find some messages about reducing the number of carbs - I believe it can be a good idea!
3) I do hope to reverse complications. Diabetes is a very witty thing - you don't feel acute pain or something like that when you start getting complications. People should be motivated to keep their bgs perfect without that but the truth is that sometimes we start thinking about causes and effects when they find out they've got coplications...

Anyway, I find it really encouraging to share information with each other, we've got some similar Russian forums but I wonder what advice doctors and patients can give all over the world - and hope to follow it if it works!

Having diabetes - no matter which typeis a hard work, so I wish you enough courage and willingness to take care of it everyday!
 

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Hello MamaSugar, welcome! It is true that keeping your blood sugar in a tighter range will cause fewer highs and lows, and result in reversing your complications. I had some retinopathy and neuropathy in 2007. I tightened my control and had fewer highs and lows. My retinopathy disappeared. My neuropathy is still present, but it does not cause me any pain now. my good control has reversed my complications.

If you read English I recommend a book called "Using Insulin" by John Walsh. If you ever use an insulin pump, John also wrote "Pumping Insulin".

I have been type 1 for 67 years, an I am very healthy.

Richard
 

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There is also a very good book that i would recommend to anyone called Think like a pancreas written by a man called Gary Sheiner. I have been diabetic for 15 years and i still learned a lot from it. The book covers both MDI and Insulin pumps. I hope this comes in usefull
 
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