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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying to lose weight and as part of that have been tracking what I eat. I've recently switched to grass fed beef, pastured eggs and dairy. I can find tons of references online to pastured meat is leaner, lower in saturated fat, etc. But I can't seem to find any statistics on how much more lean it is (%) or separate nutritional information for grass fed cuts.

Since at the moment I do REALLY care to have as accurate food log as possible, I'm wondering if anyone knows of a good resource which explains either how to calculate the fat % of grass fed or where I can simply find the nutrition info directly. Or is the difference smaller than people are making it sound?

For example, I had 5 oz grass fed brisket today for lunch. I use livestrong to track my food but their database of foods is pretty poor and didn't list it. I then tried nutritioninfo.com but they don't have it either. It seems pretty hit or miss on whether or not a grass fed version of a cut is listed.

Any ideas?
 
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This reference compares the fat content of several meats including grain-fed and grass-fed beef, although it specifies 'lean' grass-fed, possibly in an attempt to stress the lower fat levels to the general fat-fearing public.

It does show the origin of the graph shown, so you can at least check the source of the information.
 

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I have a good friend who brings me packages of her husband's organic grass fed beef and I love it, but it does require me to add fat to it to get a good meal from it. She admits it too. But, it does appear to be more nutrient rich for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have had to adjust how I cook to accommodate the lower amount of fat. Instead of adding it back in, I use lower heat and "wet" cooking methods like the slow cooker and braising.

I love the taste too! Well I love all beef but I was worried that it wouldn't taste as good as what I get from the butcher since it is lower in fat. Once I learned to cook it properly, ... delicious!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This reference compares the fat content of several meats including grain-fed and grass-fed beef, although it specifies 'lean' grass-fed, possibly in an attempt to stress the lower fat levels to the general fat-fearing public.

It does show the origin of the graph shown, so you can at least check the source of the information.
After hunting down the source, I found more general information about the benefits of pastured animal products. Eat Wild - Health Benefits

Judging from the graphs and whatnot it sounds like it is as lean as wild meat. So maybe I can just use the bison nutritional info in place of beef?
 

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I try to buy grass fed whenever I can afford it. It is more expensive but I usually find I am satisfied with smaller amounts 2-3 oz. I usually add another fat source to my meals, usually coconut oil. Grass fed meat gives you added benefits and you don't get the hormones or antibiotics which may mess with our pancreas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yeah, it is more expensive but it's better on many levels: ethically, nutritionally (omega3/6 ratios, saturated fats, CLA), no antibiotics/hormones, etc. I'm a hippie carnivore. :D

I have started to buy whole primal cuts and then butcher them myself. It works well because I save about 50% off the retail cut price plus I can portion out the meat into 5 oz servings. As soon as I have a home with space for a chest freezer, I'll be buying cow shares. That's really the cheapest route to go, plus you get all the organs and bones. YUM!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well it seems that myfitnesspal has a better selection of pastured foods in their database. Plus I like the website better so I've made the switch away from livestrong. :D

Also I emailed US Wellness Meats (my current pastured meat supplier) about their nutritional information and this was their response. Hopefully I won't have to wait too long to have more accurate information.

By January 1 we will have nutrition labels on meat packages at a cost to company of $500 for each muscle we test. There is not data base for grass-fed as there is for commodity beef. Our information will be much more accurate. We have some of the results back now and awaiting a 2nd round of lab work.

The burger products have the lean percentage on the package.

Steaks and roasts will be 25% leaner on average than conventional corn fed beef.

Stay tuned as a good bit of the new info will appear on the website shortly after December 1. We are launching a new website that will have nutrition pop ups for most of our products.
 

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I have started to buy whole primal cuts and then butcher them myself. It works well because I save about 50% off the retail cut price plus I can portion out the meat into 5 oz servings. As soon as I have a home with space for a chest freezer, I'll be buying cow shares. That's really the cheapest route to go, plus you get all the organs and bones. YUM!
This truly is the best & cheapest route, and those organ meats are wonderful (I loved the part of that CBS video showing the baking of the marrow bones!). I don't have the option now since my divorce many years ago, but my kids still benefit from getting their beef from the relatives who bred/raised it & going there once a year to help with the butchering. They're prob'ly up to five or six beeves by now - in my day it was only a couple. We knew they'd been slaughtered & hung for a decent aging period & we knew it was properly & sanitarily processed because we did it ourselves.
 
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