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If not, here's why you should: Sleep apnea check a must in Diabetes, Hypertension

It's wrong to assume that you do not have sleep apnea if you don't snore (or don't THINK you snore) or if you are thin or female. With diabetes, there's a high likelihood you may have sleep apnea, and if left untreated it puts you at spectacular risk for cardiovascular complications. If you have diabetes, you should be tested.

The article does not address it, but it is thought that the effect the disruption of sleep has on your hormones may be a CAUSE of diabetes and obesity, not necessarily the result.

I know it's daunting to think of the ordeal of sleep testing in a sleep lab. I was diagnosed by a home test that involved putting probes on two fingers and sleeping with the lightweight device strapped to my wrist all night. My insurance (Kaiser) requires home testing, and it is covered by Medicare and most other insurers if you can find a provider.

Even more daunting is to sleep with a CPAP machine. I always swore I never would, but now they will have to pry the machine and mask out of my cold, dead hands. I can't begin to express what a difference sleeping all night breathing well and fully oxygenated means to my life--without treatment I quit breathing for at least 10 seconds 79 times per hour--more often than every minute! I wasn't able to function. Now, my life has been given back to me.

Please INSIST on a sleep test if you have diabetes. Your life may depend on it.
 

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I need to go do this, nothing else has seemed to help.I think I'll can my PCP/GP and see if he can set it up. Waking up every couple of hours can't be good.
 

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I never had trouble getting used to it when I started CPAP. I've been on it since 2005 now, and I have trouble if I don't have it - like if we have a power outage. I even used it on the bus this week when we traveled to Colorado . . . Greyhound buses have power outlets now, so while everybody else charged their cell phones, I plugged in my CPAP! :cool:

I think it's a mental issue as much as anything else . . . if you see to it that your mask fits right & doesn't leak (no hissing noises or any feeling of air moving against your face), make up your mind that it's an effective non-invasive method to remedy a SERIOUS condition, and then give yourself a chance to acclimate.

I was first diagnosed with just overnight oximetry & put on 9cc; then later since I've gotten insurance, I've had a couple of sleep studies done. The first one placed me on too high pressure (15cc), so I had another one which backed me off to 12cc, which works great.
 

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I love my APAP. If insurance covers it, I highly recommend it. It automatically adjusts the pressure you need, and reduces the pressure when you exhale. I started at pressure of 14, after diabetes diagnosis and starting LCHF it's down to 9.

The first night on the machine I slept like a baby. The second night I was actually rested for the first time in years and had more trouble sleeping, so I took a few Tylenol (they make me drowsy). By the end of a week I couldn't sleep without it.

Weight doesn't have much to do with it either. I and my two brothers, all varying weights, were all diagnosed.
 

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I can't go without mine, but I have it capped at 12. I found anything higher than that felt like I was being inflated beyond capacity. Most mornings I wake to a 7-8. I have periods of time where I hate it, but I can't sleep without it, so I just have to tolerate those nights. I have also learned thats its good to disinfect with a really lightweight solution of disinfectant once in a while, as well as the daily mask wash. I don't have any insurance which covers it so it all comes out of my own pocket. Otherwise I would be updating my machine, its a really old Respironics which is going well but is so large it dominates the side table. I didn't mind when I first got it, they were all much the same, but these days, the machines are much more compact and travellable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi
I was diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea in Feb. 2012 and pre diabetes in Dec. 2012. Both were incidental findings. I have been on CPAP ever since and can't sleep without it.
Not sure what you mean by "incidental" findings but they are not really incidental. They are intimately connected. It's very likely that the sleep apnea came first, and sleep disturbances affected your hormones, including leptin, cortisol, grehlin, and the biggie--insulin.

IMHO, good medical practice would be to screen every newly diagnosed diabetic or pre-diabetic for sleep apnea. I bet the numbers would astound the medical community. Likewise, if one is diagnosed with sleep apnea, closer attention should be paid to insulin metabolism.
 

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What I mean by incidental is, I only went for sleep study was because I have restless leg syndrome and sleep study was to check for limb movements during sleep. I had no previous problems with sleep that I know of. Then I was diagnosed with severe obstructive sleep apnea as a result of the study. As for prediabetes, my HA1C and fasting glucose came back elevated during routine blood work.
 

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I am seeing the sleep specialist at the end of the month to see about having a sleep test. I am nearly falling asleep at the wheel driving to work in the morning and that just isn't right. I am only newly diagnosed as diabetic so that probably doesn't help but this isn't normal. My husband who is also diabetic has been using a cpap machine for about a year now and he wouldn't go anywhere overnight without it. He used to stop breathing, snore incredibly loudly and thrash around in the bed all night. Now I sometimes have to reach out and feel if he is actually in bed, he sleeps so peacefully. We both love it.
 

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I understand that the body triggers a spike in insulin when one is apneaic, and that that can cause insulin intolerance. In my case, the sleep apnea is partly due to a spinal cord injury, and the diabetes occurred after I had a severe pancreatitis (gallstones)

I love my APAP
 
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