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Hello Forum, my name is John and I am a new member. I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes about 5 weeks ago. I have a family history of Type 2 diabetes, but I didn't expect the onset would be so quick. I had a fasting blood sugar level of 350 during a physical exam with my doctor in August. A few weeks later I ended up in the ER with my glucose close to 500.

I am taking insulin and metformin for treatment, and have made adjustments to my diet. I'm finding the dietary changes very difficult. In fact, all of this is difficult, emotionally, for me. I'm a single male, with a pretty demanding job, and multiple interests and hobbies on the side, but I'm feeling very alone in this struggle. My family lives about 3 hours away and they feel even further away than ever.

I'm also a bit angry. I'd been a smoker for over 20 years and I quit about 2 and a half years ago. After quitting, I began to gain weight, and I ended up getting quite overweight (I gained about 45 pounds.) Then I started to lose some weight, but the diabetes symptoms started, too. Then, my weight came off so quickly. I didn't know at the time that it was because of the diabetes that I was losing so much weight so quickly. Now that I'm on insulin, I have gained back about 10 pounds. I feel incredibly frustrated - I've been diligently trying to do what is right for me, and yet it seems as though I'm paying for it all the time. I feel as though my body and I are at war with each other.

As you can guess, it's taking some effort for me to come to terms with this illness. I would love to get to a point at which I am healthier and can even perhaps take less insulin, or not be dependent on insulin, but it feels as though that will be a long time from now. I was hoping that reading and writing at a forum such as this might help my state of mind and health.

Thank you for time, and hello to you all.
 

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Hello John . . . I think you'll be glad you found us. It DOES help to converse with others in the same boat. My family is far away too, & I don't know other diabetics around here, so this forum is my lifeline. And if I were you, I'd be hacked off too. What did you doc DO in August when you presented with that astronomical fasting blood sugar? Anything? A normal non-diabetic fasting is about 70 or 80 mg/dl. Yours was 350. Did you doc even raise his eyebrows? If he made any suggestions, did you follow them? Somebody dropped the ball here - you shouldn't have wound up in ER.

But that was then, and this is now. You can gain good control of this by adjusting your diet & matching your insulin to what you eat. Do you have a meter to keep track of your blood sugar levels? You need that first, and if none is forthcoming, go to Walmart & get the ReliOn meter & a package of strips. The ReliOn strips are much cheaper than other brands, which is why I refer you to Walmart.

If you haven't been given any dietary advice, you may want to start limiting your carb intake, which means avoiding all the pasta, potatoes, bread, milk, sweets, fruit/fruit juices, and anything at all that's made with grain (wheat, corn, oats, rice, etc., etc.). You can eat plenty of eggs/meat/poultry/fish and full-fat cheeses, dairy butter, heavy cream, bacon, nuts, avocados, and high-fiber vegetables like asparagus, artichokes, celery, broccoli, cauliflower, etc.

It's a rude awakening, and it's overwhelming at first. You can rant & rave to us all you like - we all know what it feels like. We also know that it's manageable. We know that it was the wake-up call many of us needed and we've pulled ourselves together & become fitter & healthier than ever before. You can too.

Take care & thank you for joining us!
 

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Hi John, and welcome to the Forum. We all know how you feel right about now...been there done that too many times. I unfortunately ignored my diabetes for a long time, thinking it would just resolve itself. I started out with diabetes with my first pregnancy; that was almost 20 years ago now. So gestational diabetes was the culprit, and it went away after the first baby was born. However, it reared its ugly head again with my second pregnancy, and earlier this time. That was 17 years ago. From that point on, I was pretty much diabetic, just not as severe as I am now. I've been messing around between oral meds and insulin for the past at least 10 years now. I've been to many endo's who just were as arrogant as all heck, and I refuse to go to doctor's who act like that. I have found an endo doctor whom I absolutely adore, who is very kind and works with me to get my numbers lower. A low carb/high fat diet is really the way to go, and once you get going on it and find out all the stuff you CAN eat that you thought you couldn't you will not even miss those high carb foods that you have become used to eating. I am on metformin as well as insulin; a basal, or long acting one, and a bolus, fast acting for meals. I also gained about 10 lbs the first couple of weeks that I started on the insulin, but so far (knock on wood) I'm holding steady with that gain. The doctor warned me I was going to gain weight with insulin, but she also said we would take care of that later; it was much more important for me to get my bg's under control. I'm still working on that part, but I must say they are way better than they were.
Don't look at being diabetic as a death sentence. You can live a very healthy full life with diabetes. Don't get down on yourself because you need to use insulin. I fought insulin for so long because I tried it before and it didn't make that much of a difference. However, I never knew about eating LC/HF diet, and was only put on a basal insulin. I gained ALOT of weight on that one (over 50 lbs.) and couldn't stand it anymore. I quit the insulin and lost the weight over the next year. So, needless to say I was very skittish to go back on insulin. But, with the combination of basal and bolus, and the LC/HF diet, and exercise I can handle 10 lbs. It makes it easier to see ahead and know that I can lose that, rather than 50 lbs.! Finding out you are diabetic and have to use meds or insulin is rather depressing at first. You feel like someone just committed you to a life sentence. Don't look at it that way. Look at it in a positive fashion that at least you know that you have it now and it can be controlled. And, you can have a very full long life with it. There is currently no cure for diabetes, but yes, as you become better controlled the doctor may ease you off the insulin. So, there is the possibility of no insulin in the future if you want it. I felt the same way as you about my body becoming my worst enemy. I still think that way sometimes because I know I'm doing everything right, and yet sometimes I still get high numbers for who knows what reason. It is frustrating, but these wonderful people here on this forum help me through those times and let me know that I'm not a failure because I had an unusual high number. I've learned also that you can eat delicious satisfying foods through many of the recipes that are posted here. And, I still go back and read from bloodsugar101 website because I'm sure there is something I didn't read or missed the first time I read it. It's a great place to start when you are first diagnosed and it helps for a person to understand their diabetes.
Good Luck and keep us posted on your progress. If you need to rant and rave, go ahead. We will be here for you. I have found a place where I belong, and I'm not leaving any time soon! Again, welcome to our diabetic family!:welcome:
 

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Hi John - welcome to the forum. Congrats on quitting smoking - an awesome thing you did for yourself.

Diabetes involves a learning curve, learning general information and then specifically for our own body. A wealth of information in a comprehensive, researched, accessible format is at bloodsugar101.com.

When I was diagnosed, all I knew about diabetes was that one shouldn't eat sugar, simple carbs probably weren't a good idea, and one could lose their feet. I also had high numbers, but was able to bring them down mostly through cutting out the carbs and eating the way Shanny said above. She and others here told me that too - I obeyed - and my blood sugar is in control now.

There is a tremendous support team right here on DF - I could not have made it without them.

Glad you're here.
 
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Hi I m taipan and am new to this forum. After a day of sudden frequent urination n thirst, afriend who has a diabetic wife decides to help test my blood. To my shock, the meter read 21.2 where normally it is 4 to 8 for healthy people. Am I diabetic? Pls advise.
Anyway, hello to everyone here.
 

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Hi I m taipan and am new to this forum. After a day of sudden frequent urination n thirst, afriend who has a diabetic wife decides to help test my blood. To my shock, the meter read 21.2 where normally it is 4 to 8 for healthy people. Am I diabetic? Pls advise.
Anyway, hello to everyone here.
Hi taipan - it would be best if you could make your own thread for answers - but yes, if the test was ACCURATE that would identify diabetes. However, if you had any trace amounts of any sugars on your fingers when you did the test, it could be thrown off.

Whenever I test MUCH HIGHER than expected, I will re-wash my hands quite well and ensure they're well-rinsed and re-test.
 

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Hello Forum, my name is John and I am a new member. I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes about 5 weeks ago. . .
Hi John and :welcome: from me.

I am taking insulin and metformin for treatment, and have made adjustments to my diet. I'm finding the dietary changes very difficult. . .
The best ways to start, and the least impact on your system. The only question I have is what "adjustments" were made to your diet. If you were recommended the typical diabetes association "low-fat, lots of complex-carbs" diet, that's just plain wrong. The proper diet is Low-Carbohydrate, High Fat.

The accumulating evidence regarding the role of low-carb diets in helping diabetics manage their condition is overwhelming –- and even though the American Diabetes Association (ADA) admits this, it still will not change its dietary recommendations. I personally think this is due to the ADA's funding - it comes from big Pharmacy and Food Giants (Carb Pushers) to the tune of 20-30million every year - no exaggeration.

I now eat less than 10% of my calories from carb, and have much better control of my blood sugars. I would need insulin currently if I were taking 50% of my calories from carb, as the ADA and most medical doctors recommend. (Most MD's simply follow the ADA's advice, as do all dietitians and nutritionists.)

Places to start regarding diet:

Blood Sugar 101
- especially the "How to Lower your Blood Sugar" link...
Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt's LCHF for Beginners
Dr. Bernstein's 'Diabetes Solution' Book (some available free online), or get it at your library


Now that I'm on insulin, I have gained back about 10 pounds. I feel incredibly frustrated - I've been diligently trying to do what is right for me, and yet it seems as though I'm paying for it all the time.
That's very common with insulin. The key to watching weight as a Type II on insulin is to be able to reduce the amount you need - this is best done by eating low-carb. As a Type II it's extremely likely you're insulin-resistant. We almost universally are. That's what compounds this for us and why so many Type II's are overweight - it's the insulin-resistance. Lowering your carb intake lowers blood glucose (All Carbohydrate becomes glucose, PERIOD) and as such it lowers our need for insulin. Once your insulin levels are able to be reduced (maybe eliminated) your weight gain will be under control - and you'll be able to lose weight.

I would love to get to a point at which I am healthier and can even perhaps take less insulin, or not be dependent on insulin, but it feels as though that will be a long time from now.
The time IS now! Seriously, take control of the diet - it's not as difficult as some think. ANY thing you think prevents you from eating LCHF (Low-Carb, High-Fat) tell us about and we'll try to help you overcome it! With the diet controlled, make time to find at least 30, preferably 45 minutes or more daily for exercise - even simple walking. This not only burns off excess glucose, it helps insulin-resistance and improves stress levels - which also help with other hormonal problems (cortisol, leptin, etc.). With all this, you CAN lose weight.

Thank you for time, and hello to you all.
Glad to meet you, and I look forward to talking with you more. Good Luck!
 
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I don't know how to thank all of you for your thorough and very thoughtful replies to my original post. They mean a lot to me, and definitely make me realize that I'm not alone in this disease. Shanny, thanks much for the 'diet 101' advice - I wasn't aware of the importance of the higher fats and proteins. But you know, I have to say that I got very good treatment from my diabetes counselor at the hospital where I was briefly - the NP who instructed me on diet had said that the less wheat/grain in my intake, the better, and she didn't stress low fats. Precious, I see what you mean about meal by meal! NayNay, it sounds as though you had QUITE a struggle - I can imagine that a pregnancy would complicate things immeasurably, indeed. Thank you for all that helpful advice. Moon, thank you for the link and the welcome. Beefy, I agree that now is the time to take care and take charge - thank you also for all that great advice and data.

I can give you an update on my status, and thanks for indulging me as I divulge :)
Much to my surprise, there is quite a lot of good news to report over the past few weeks. My daily blood glucose readings have come down significantly, so much so that we've twice reduced my 'per meal' humalog insulin amount. I decided that this was as good a time as any to become very active at the gym, so I am sticking to a rigorous 4-day-per-week schedule at my YMCA, even locating all the branches at different areas around me so that there is always a Y to go to. I've found that this is helping my numbers go down, too... and it's making me physically stronger.
I did learn one lesson, though - one evening at the gym, I began to feel a bit faint as I was sweating it out on the elliptical machine - of course when I checked my blood glucose, it had dropped to about 65 (which for me is REALLY low), so I went out to the car and popped a few peppermints in my mouth and I was much better in about 15 minutes. So the lesson learned was that I need to eat something before I go to the gym.

I've been seeing my endocrinologist about once very 3 weeks, and since September, I've gained 25 pounds. However, (and this is a REALLY SMALL victory) I only gained 3 pounds in the last two weeks, which my doctor said is a sign that I'm finally leveling off.

I'm actually not too worried about the Thanksgiving holiday coming up - because so many people in my family are diabetic, it will not be so difficult to keep the meal under control. My doctor did warn, however, that NO ONE loses weight between November and January... heh heh. I had to chuckle at that. I'm going to try despite that prophecy.

Thank you all again for your warm welcome, I hope to contribute more to this forum on a regular basis.
 

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John,
I am in about the same position you are. I know how you feel. I have gone from being afraid to being depressed and everything in between. This is definately a complicated thing to manage. What got me at first was the mileage may vary/everyone is different. Just made it frustrating and confusing as to what works.

I am getting myself eduated up, learning about diet and testing and hopefully that will allow me to figure this thing out. Hang in there!
 

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Hello joinkoi,

Everyone here is so helpful. I was diagnosed with Type 2 in October. It runs on my moms side really bad. I never thought I would be here but here I am and I like talking to the members and getting their feed on things when I can not get the answers else where. My mom is type 2 and sometimes it helps me to have someone near that knows what I am going through. I wish we all did not have to be a part of this site for the reason we are here but we are here and helping each other the best we can. So welcome and I hope you get the answers you need.
 

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My doctor did warn, however, that NO ONE loses weight between November and January... heh heh. I had to chuckle at that. I'm going to try despite that prophecy.
Hi John!

I'm new here too...was just diagnosed about two weeks ago.

And while my mother is diabetic, she's also a nut-case and I can't really talk to her about this. It would worry her too much. So, the folks around me that I can talk to can't quite understand how powerful such a diagnosis is. I came looking for a "diabetes home" and so far feel very comfortable here.

Anyway, I had to pull out your doctors comment! Just saw my endo for the first time on Monday. And I am doing my damndest to lose weight by my next visit (in January). Wii fit and watching what I eat are hopefully going to get me there even with the holidays and my love for baking.

It CAN be done...it just takes determination!
 

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I feel as though my body and I are at war with each other.
It simply breaks my heart when I read from new fellow diabetics. I've been battling this stupid disease for many years but yet I haven't forgotten one bit how lost, alone, and utterly overwhelmed I was back then. I can relate to what you're going through.

You've come to the right place! Hello and welcome!! :)
 

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What got me at first was the mileage may vary/everyone is different. Just made it frustrating and confusing as to what works.
I think this IS really disconcerting for people to realize that, to get the best control, they need to use their own meters & figure out the effect of their own meals on their own blood sugar. There are no shortcuts & nobody else can map it out for us. Yeah, that can be intimidating and VERY frustrating!
 

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I think this IS really disconcerting for people to realize that, to get the best control, they need to use their own meters & figure out the effect of their own meals on their own blood sugar. There are no shortcuts & nobody else can map it out for us. Yeah, that can be intimidating and VERY frustrating!
It seems doctors don't agree with this method. Their approach is more of a 'one size fits all' treatment. I hate that!
 

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Thanks for the update - great news!

I was high at diagnosis like you were, a bit higher but who's counting, and my diabetes is fairly well-controlled without insulin. With what I know now though, I think I would've asked for insulin at first to give my battered pancreas a rest.

You said in your first post that you'd like to take less insulin (you've done that!) or not be dependent at all. If that's still something you want, it doesn't necessarily have to take a long time to get there. I know I couldn't have without going low-carb (not 'less' grain but basically no grain) - there are plenty of trade-offs to consider.

Good to see you, and a diabetic Thanksgiving sounds delicious!
 

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Hi John welcome from me also, it sounds like you are doing really well with your diet & exercise which is paying off.
Keep up the good work & keep us posted.
Also have you checked out the recipe section on here as there are some good alternatives to what most of us were previously chomping on in out pre D lives!
Take care

Sent from my iPhone using Diabetes
 

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hi John and welcome to the forum
 
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