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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hello everybody!

I'm doing a master in industrial design at the Oslo School of Architecture and Design in Norway.

This semester I am cooperating with a small company, and our goal is to improve/make a new product for people with diabetes that, hopefully, can make it easier to cope with diabetes.

I don't have diabetes, and have little experience on the field.Before I can start designing I need to find different problem areas, so I was hoping that some of you could share some good or bad experiences with me. It could be everything from good/bad products to difficult situations.

Thanks a lot!:)

kind regards
Christian von Hanno
 

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What I have seen people complain about is that there meter case is not functional. They need storage for the right stuff, a built in clock that can have alarms set on it and be easy to clean. If it had a radio or video games built into it it would be great.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
What I have seen people complain about is that there meter case is not functional. They need storage for the right stuff, a built in clock that can have alarms set on it and be easy to clean. If it had a radio or video games built into it it would be great.
Thank you for sharing your experience! I have now moved on to the next stage in the project, and I have decided to improve the insulin pump and make it more user friendly for children.

There is quite a few pumps under development but non of them is (as far as I know) seems to be especially for children.

If you have any thoughts or experience on the field please share! thanks again!
 

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Thank you for sharing your experience! I have now moved on to the next stage in the project, and I have decided to improve the insulin pump and make it more user friendly for children.

There is quite a few pumps under development but non of them is (as far as I know) seems to be especially for children.

If you have any thoughts or experience on the field please share! thanks again!
I am not sure what you are trying to make more child freindly on them as they all do the same thing. If it is apearance there are all kinds of aftermarket grahics in the for of bezels, stickers, and cases that let you customixe your pump to suite you. You still need to stick it in your skin and you still need to test a lot.
 

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My 11-year-old grand-niece has been pumping for several years and seems to have no trouble understanding how to operate her pump. She's already worn out the first one, and is on her second one. Kids these days are very computer-savvy, and that's the basics of a pump, right? Tell the computer the right numbers so the pump can do its thing. Of course she is still supervised by her parents & the other adults in her life, but she does all her finger pricks, computes her carbs & enters the data into the pump very handily. Last I knew she wasn't changing out the sites herself, but that's prob'ly coming soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I am not sure what you are trying to make more child freindly on them as they all do the same thing. If it is apearance there are all kinds of aftermarket grahics in the for of bezels, stickers, and cases that let you customixe your pump to suite you. You still need to stick it in your skin and you still need to test a lot.
Hello! There are a few pumps under development, like the JewelPump and the solo4you which are quite similar to the omnipod, where you have the pump connected to your body and use a remote with a glucose meter to control the insulin.

The problem with the remote control is that if you loose it, you loose control of the pump, and some children tend to loose things more often than others. Another example is the jewelPump which is very slim and discreet, but it uses a HTC smart phone to control the device, an expensive phone for a child.. the interface and menu's are also quite advanced, in example for a 7 year old child, i think.

maybe a friendly looking, tube free, insuline pump with integrated continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) which communicates with a user friendly watch is a solution, or something? I'm working on it;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My 11-year-old grand-niece has been pumping for several years and seems to have no trouble understanding how to operate her pump. She's already worn out the first one, and is on her second one. Kids these days are very computer-savvy, and that's the basics of a pump, right? Tell the computer the right numbers so the pump can do its thing. Of course she is still supervised by her parents & the other adults in her life, but she does all her finger pricks, computes her carbs & enters the data into the pump very handily. Last I knew she wasn't changing out the sites herself, but that's prob'ly coming soon.
Thanks for sharing! Yes, one of my goals is to make the pump more user friendly and aim it towards children rather than diabetes experts.
 
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