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My name is Gemma and I am not a diabetic. My partner is type 1 and I work as a Registered Nutritionist. Tomorrow I'm doing a lecture on the '7 Steps to Optimal Health' specifically for people with Type 2 diabetes. I will also be holding a retreat for people with Type 2 on the weekend of April 1st - 3rd.

I have a question to anyone that can help me... I would like to know more about insulin-dependent Type ll's. Does the pancreas burn out after long turm insulin resistance? I'm just not sure. Or I could be mistaken when I hear people say their family member shoots insulin but is Type II.
 

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Hello Gemma. You are not mistaken about hearing that many type 2 PWD require insulin. But it isn't insulin usage that burns out the pancreata of type 2 PWD, it's usually the barrage of sulfonylurea drugs given to stimulate insulin production in an organ that is already struggling against insulin resistance, which, as you surely already know, is the hallmark of type 2 diabetes. After just so much abuse, the beta cells die off, and Oops! No more endogenous insulin production. This is a fair description of the cure being worse than the cause. It's also a strong argument for sticking with the old tried-and-true drug metformin, which does NOT hammer the pancreas to product more insulin, but instead counters the insulin resistance, helping the cells access the insulin that is already available.
 

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I think we are all different on how quickly our Type 2 progresses. Many can stay with diet and exercise or oral meds for many years while some need to go to insulin right away. I think a lot of it is the advise Type 2's get from the medical community. Most continue to eat higher carb , low fat diets . I was told by my CDE it was ok to be 180 after meals. I am glad I found the good folks on online communities who set me straight. I now aim for 110 after meals. The other thing most Type 2's are not encouraged to test a lot. Testing a lot especially in the beginning will tell you which foods spike you and you should avoid. By doing this and eating things that don't spike me I can keep my bgs close to normal. So far I have been able to avoid insulin because by eating low carb I don't put too much stress on my pancreas. Those who continue to eat high carb and are insulin resistant will burn out their remaining beta cells rather quickly. Also as Shanny said all the Sulfyurea drugs that overstimulate the pancreas to produce insulin, kill off precious beta cells. Actually Type 2's who use insulin sometimes need more insulin than Type 1's because of the insulin resistance. That is why it is so important to limit carbs, especially processed ones.
 

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I think part of the confusion is that there are many different causes of Type 2 -- including Type 1.5, which is slow autoimmune! And no one seems to be quite sure what those causes are. Have you seen the metabolic cycle? It's COMPLICATED -- plenty of signalling and things to go wrong, on top of that.

The only known cause of pancreatic burnout, besides autoimmunity and plain old hyperglycemia placing a higher demand, are oral medications that stimulate insulin release. Ie, sulfonylureas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I wonder if this "quick reply" button gets out to everyone to read?

Hmmm... Well I wanted to say 'Thanks' to everyone for helping me out on that one. I feel much better. The safety of fibre is reconfirmed. Blame it on the Sulfonylureas.

I'm sure glad I found this forum.
Gemma
 

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The quick reply button goes out to us all. Welcome to the forum!
 

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I have a few online friends who are type 2 and take Metformin, but they had to start using insulin. Their control improved very much for awhile with insulin, and then they were finding they were having to take larger and larger doses. They started gaining more weight as the dosages increased. Now they are using insulin pumps and are much improved. Their control is much more stable, and they are using much less insulin. That has resulted in weight loss.

There are approximately 26 million diabetics in the US at this time. 10% are T1 (2.6 million) and 90% are T2 (23.4 million). I read a few years ago that 17% of the T2 diabetics are insulin dependent. (I am reasonably sure of that percentage.) Thus, 17% of 23.4 million, or approximately 4 million T2 diabetics are insulin dependent. Of course all of the 2.6 million T1 diabetics are insulin dependent. This means that there are 1.4 million more T2 than T1 diabetics who are dependent on insulin.

(Please pardon my math, I am a mathematician. What can I say? :rolleyes: )

Richard
 
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hi Gemma
Well I'm one of those type 2 diabetics on insulin. What I can say is that everyone is different and can't all be painted with the same brush. My personal experience is I was diagnosed type 2 as a 25yo with a few precursors to diabetes which included a hormonal condition discovered when I was diagnosed with diabetes (yeah a couple of surprises to deal with for me). I started my BGL control using diet and exercise and was successful for a couple of years only on that and then I had to start using oral meds... starting with Metformin which intially worked for a year or so. This drug made me ill daily with GI side effects and they kept me on the damn thing for 5 years and then started introducing other drugs to work on pancreas along with the metformin in that time and then agreed to cancel out metformin and just treat me with all the other drugs they could find (excluding Avandia which is a banned drug now here). I have a big question mark on metformin because now I'm dealing with an undiagnosed GI condition and having tests done still... and I wonder whether metformin is the cause or start of my problems with getting weaker stomach and infections (as I was fine before starting metformin really). I was trialled on all the doses and types of metformin for those 5 years. Can you tell I'm not a fan? lol. Oral meds didn't work on me for a few more years and they finally did C-peptide and GAD test on me a year ago and discovered I have beta cell damage and I no longer produce enough of my own insulin to support my needs.... hence now I inject insulin. Oral meds can no longer be used for me. I'm on relatively small dosage of basal (controls fasting BGL) and bolus (meals) insulin at the moment... hopefully I can keep it that way. :D
 

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Welcome to the Forum!
 

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:welcome: Gemma! Glad to have you here!

Jwags just wondering why you use coconut oil daily?

lanzlady
Lots of Type-II diabetics do. Research has shown that coconut oil can help with insulin-sensitivity and glucose-tolerance over time.

There are several articles out there if you google it. I found this one rather informative without being overly-technical.
 

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For further research on coconut oil, look for medium-chain triglycerides - MCT oil. That's the secret weapon . . . :)
 
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