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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was just diagnosed with type 2 a few days ago and as with all newbies am somewhat overwhelmed and preoccupied with all the reading. I am so glad to have found this site!
 

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I was just diagnosed with type 2 a few days ago and as with all newbies am somewhat overwhelmed and preoccupied with all the reading. I am so glad to have found this site!
Hello Darbro,

Welcome to the forum.

As you've noticed, there's a lot of information available out there. There's also a lot of mis-information as well. Listen to the guys on this forum. Unlike the drug companies, they've no axe to grind other than their determination not to let this disease get the better of them.

If you have questions, ask away. There will be someone with an answer.

Another great place to look at is www.bloodsugar101.com. The author, Jenny Ruhl is diabetic herself and her site is packed with useful non jargon filled information. It's well worth a look.

Why not do a bit of an introductory post about yourself? Nothing too elaborate, just how you got where you are, and how you plan to cope.

Again, welcome to the club - and sorry you have to be here.

:)John
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for responding.

I went to the doctor recently for symptoms that included a chronic infection and inappropriate sleepiness and was floored by the bg 279 relayed to me by the nurse over the phone. I therefore knew my dx before returning to the doc who gave me scripts for the glucometer/metformin and glyburide and sent me on my way. Taking my own glucose readings really brought it home for me and I immediately changed to a south-beach'ish diet and am attempting to increase my exercise. It's been a few days and my bg is still high and not feeling great (probably the drop from 279+ ?), but am soo glad to have found this site. As a single father of 4 it is challenging, both the diet and hiding my concern. I am anxious to get my levels down to normal and have lots of questions for those that have gone through this.
 

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Thank you for responding.

I went to the doctor recently for symptoms that included a chronic infection and inappropriate sleepiness and was floored by the bg 279 relayed to me by the nurse over the phone. I therefore knew my dx before returning to the doc who gave me scripts for the glucometer/metformin and glyburide and sent me on my way. Taking my own glucose readings really brought it home for me and I immediately changed to a south-beach'ish diet and am attempting to increase my exercise. It's been a few days and my bg is still high and not feeling great (probably the drop from 279+ ?), but am soo glad to have found this site. As a single father of 4 it is challenging, both the diet and hiding my concern. I am anxious to get my levels down to normal and have lots of questions for those that have gone through this.
Getting your numbers down to the normal range will take some effort and yes, you will probably feel a bit uncomfortable with hypo like symptoms until your body gets used to the lower values.

One investment you will have to make is in test strips for your meter. Until you nail your diet down, you need to test, test and then test some more. It takes a lot of strips but there's no real option.

Jenny's site (www.bloodsugar101.com) covers the detail better than I can, so again I have to point you there.

The enemy is anything containing carbohydrate - not just sugar, but potatoes, rice, pasta, bread and cereals in general. Cut down on these but watch your figures whilst you are using medication. The combination of reduced carbohydrates and medication could send you into a real hypo situation.

Good luck.

John
 

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As a single father of 4 it is challenging, both the diet and hiding my concern. I am anxious to get my levels down to normal and have lots of questions for those that have gone through this.
The example you set by gaining control of this and taking care of yourself will be one of the best life lessons that you ever teach your kids. This from a woman whose father was diagnosed in his mid 40s and controlled his diabetes through religious adherence to a diet that worked for him and regular vigorous exercise until Parkinsons got the better of him in his late 70s. He was an inspiration. You will be too.
 
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Welcome to DF. I know it is overwhelming but take a deep breath and relax. There is a lot of information out there and some of it contradicts others. One website that really helped me is www.bloodsugar101 Another good blog is
Gretchen Becker - Home she has a great book that helps type 2's in their first year. The most important thing is your bg meter. Use it a lot in the beginning to see how your D body reacts to carbs, exercise and even not eating. Write everything down and pretty soon you will see bg trends. Are you on any medication, yet. Don't feel medication is a failure. Many of us use it. I use metformin and it has been terrific for me. That paired with a low carb diet, exercise and stress relief are very important. I know you are concerned about your kids, I have 5. The best thing you can give them is a healthy dad. My bgs were 240 when I was dx'd and now they are in the low 100's.
 

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Hello & welcome, Darbro. You've been well advised by these members, and I have nothing to add except my agreement. It does get easier, and we're here for you whenever you get overwhelmed or have questions or just need to let off steam.

Nearly everyone here has been through it, and lived to tell about it. :) There will be days when you just want to throw the bloomin' meter against the wall (and a few have done exactly that - it's called the Grand Meter Fling! ;)) and be done with the whole stupid mess. But then your numbers straighten out & you get a good A1c, or your lipids profile improves beyond all reason (LC/HF way-of-eating has a way of doing that), and all the battles are worthwhile when you realize you're protecting your eyesight, your kidneys, your toes . . . and feel better than you have for years.

Thank you for joining us; I'm glad you found us!
 

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Welcome Darbro to our "little" forum here! We are and have been in the same boat at one time or another, but please listen to all the people here as they are a wealth of information. I dare to say that most here know more than the doctors do! I am living proof that the low carb/high fat way of eating does work. I lowered my triglycerides in the last three months from almost 500 to 169. My HDL cholesterol raised from 33 to 45, and my LDL is at 80. I brought my HbA1C down from 12.1 to 9.1, and am hoping to be close to the 5% club by next blood work at the end of March, 2012. Your meter is your lifeline when beginning to eat LC/HF, so don't be afraid to test, test, and test some more. Test before you eat, and then 1 hr and then 2 hrs after eating to see how your body responds to what you ate. This is how you will learn what your body can handle and what to stay away from. You will have days when you are disgusted with your numbers, but then you will have days when your numbers will be perfect. It is all trial and error in the beginning, and sometimes beyond, but you will get there. Those 4 little angels of yours are a good reason to do it.

We are all here to support and help you. If you ever feel the need to vent, we are here for that too.

By the way, not just for you Darbro but for everyone else on the forum, my endo doctor said she went and talked to the dieticians and told them the amount of carbs per meal that they are directing diabetics to eat is way too much and they are killing people by telling this. I was so happy she told me that! I am going to give her this websites address to come and join us. She is a wonderful super endo, and actually is called a diabetologist since she only deals with adults and diabetes. I just love her! I wish we all had her for an endo.

Good Luck and keep us informed of your progress.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The example you set by gaining control of this and taking care of yourself will be one of the best life lessons that you ever teach your kids. This from a woman whose father was diagnosed in his mid 40s and controlled his diabetes through religious adherence to a diet that worked for him and regular vigorous exercise until Parkinsons got the better of him in his late 70s. He was an inspiration. You will be too.
Thank you so much for this! I feel a need to hear success stories like this, and the positive spin on teaching the kids is also wonderful and much appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you very much for responding John, your link is much appreciated and I'm grateful for your experience. While I still have so much reading to do, I see that most recommend high fat along more of an Atkins approach in contrast to South beach, which frowns on the fats. However, I understand that losing body fat/weight is important to normalizing blood glucose too. So I'm wondering whether there is any consensus on this site as to whether one should hold off on the fats until the body weight is down or whether to start right away with the higher fats? I ask you because I see that you dropped significant pounds and wonder whether high fat in the diet helped or hindered progress in that regard. Thanks much again for your attention to my post.

Getting your numbers down to the normal range will take some effort and yes, you will probably feel a bit uncomfortable with hypo like symptoms until your body gets used to the lower values.

One investment you will have to make is in test strips for your meter. Until you nail your diet down, you need to test, test and then test some more. It takes a lot of strips but there's no real option.


The enemy is anything containing carbohydrate - not just sugar, but potatoes, rice, pasta, bread and cereals in general. Cut down on these but watch your figures whilst you are using medication. The combination of reduced carbohydrates and medication could send you into a real hypo situation.

Good luck.

John
 

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Shanny beat me to the punch but I agree with her completely.

Keeping it personal:

Here's my lipid profile in August 2010 when I was diagnosed:
Total Cholestorel 1.36 HDL 0.39 LDL 0.82 Triglycerides 0.96

And this is it now:
Total Cholestorel 1.98 HDL 1.04 LDL 0.85 Triglycerides 0.43

It's in French units (multiply by 100 for US values):

Weight was 182lbs - now 152lbs (got there in February).
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thank you for your post :) Yes I'm presently taking 500mg metformin q.d. and 5mg glyBuride twice daily a.c. At diagnosis I immediately stopped all non-fiber carbs and am hoping to get my numbers down. I've blown through tons of the strips already and will have to figure out how to get more soon, ironically despite the fact that I'm scheduled for a "diabetes education" session on Dec 27th where they are supposed to show me how to use the glucometer.

Regarding the kids, it's not so much the discussion about the disease as much as it is meal preparation for them and for me. I know that they will have to also make some changes. The immediate challenge as a single parent is finding the time for the exercise and food prep. In any event, I thank you for your post and concur that the priority for helping them is to to get myself on track health-wise.

Welcome to DF. I know it is overwhelming but take a deep breath and relax. There is a lot of information out there and some of it contradicts others. One website that really helped me is she has a great book that helps type 2's in their first year. The most important thing is your bg meter. Use it a lot in the beginning to see how your D body reacts to carbs, exercise and even not eating. Write everything down and pretty soon you will see bg trends. Are you on any medication, yet. Don't feel medication is a failure. Many of us use it. I use metformin and it has been terrific for me. That paired with a low carb diet, exercise and stress relief are very important. I know you are concerned about your kids, I have 5. The best thing you can give them is a healthy dad. My bgs were 240 when I was dx'd and now they are in the low 100's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thank you for the welcome, I can already tell that this is a great site :)

Hello & welcome, Darbro. You've been well advised by these members, and I have nothing to add except my agreement. It does get easier, and we're here for you whenever you get overwhelmed or have questions or just need to let off steam.

Nearly everyone here has been through it, and lived to tell about it. :) There will be days when you just want to throw the bloomin' meter against the wall (and a few have done exactly that - it's called the Grand Meter Fling! ;)) and be done with the whole stupid mess. But then your numbers straighten out & you get a good A1c, or your lipids profile improves beyond all reason (LC/HF way-of-eating has a way of doing that), and all the battles are worthwhile when you realize you're protecting your eyesight, your kidneys, your toes . . . and feel better than you have for years.

Thank you for joining us; I'm glad you found us!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thank you for the advice, it's well taken. Although I don't know that I would call my kids "angels", your point is sound; their dependence on me is highly motivating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks again, sorry if it's too personal, but I'm 190lb now (5'10"), similar to your starting point. Would you be willing to elaborate on the amount and kind of exercise that is required?

Shanny beat me to the punch but I agree with her completely.

Keeping it personal:

Here's my lipid profile in August 2010 when I was diagnosed:
Total Cholestorel 1.36 HDL 0.39 LDL 0.82 Triglycerides 0.96

And this is it now:
Total Cholestorel 1.98 HDL 1.04 LDL 0.85 Triglycerides 0.43

It's in French units (multiply by 100 for US values):

Weight was 182lbs - now 152lbs (got there in February).
 

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Thanks again, sorry if it's too personal, but I'm 190lb now (5'10"), similar to your starting point. Would you be willing to elaborate on the amount and kind of exercise that is required?
Not a problem.

First of all though, I do have an unfair advantage. I'm married to Judy who is a great cook, very knowledgable on nutrition and an absolute tyrant when I even think about cheating!:)

Whilst I was lying in bed, lazing in hospital, she was doing her homework.

My diet since diagnosis has generally been around 2,000 calories per day - with carbohydrates limited to around 80 grams. Gone is sugar, bread, rice and pasta. We also avoid artifical sweeneners for several reasons - one of which is that aspartame gives me migraines! Judy tries to avoid buying anything which has funny chemical "enhancers", so we do tend to look more at the free range products rather than factory farmed.

Anyway - a typical breakfast for me:

Large black coffee. 2 large eggs, fried in butter. 1 homemade beefburger, one endive chopped or a green salad or a good helping of spinach - stir fried (butter again). About 1oz of nuts (usually walnuts). A small piece of fruit (decision based on my fasting figure - below 80, it's usually a banana. Above 90, it's likely to be lemon juice in water!)

Lunch is generally a meat dish - a stew or stir fry with low carb veggies (things like broccoli, cauliflower, brussel sprouts etc), a piece of fruit (not the same one as breakfast), about 1 oz of cheese (made with raw milk), and about 1 oz of nuts (almonds mostly)

Dinner will usually be fish - fried again or poached. Again, low carb veggies, another chunk of cheese, one ounce of nuts (hazelnuts - we'd rather it was pecans but they are too d...med expensive over here), another piece of fruit and a glass of red wine.

How she manages to ring the changes but keep me under 90 grams of carb amazes me - but there it is :D

Calorifically, at the moment I'm on about 2,200. From August 2010 to Feburary 2011, I was losing a steady 1lb per week - and I was never hungry. Meals are generally at a regular time, so we don't have strange periods to confuse my already confused pancras.

Exercise?

Walking the dog - generally we do around 5 to 7 miles per day at a brisk walk. This is usually split into three sessions, have a meal, wash the dishes, walk the dog! And she knows the rules too. If the weather's good, after lunch it's likely to be a hike in the woods - double our distance and the dog, Alys will do about 20 miles running like an idiot. But she still wants her evening walk!

The problem with our diet is that it does take time to plan, buy and prepare the meals since very little can be obtained in a convenient "packaged" format - in fact those are the things we need to avoid. This does add to the cost - our food budget has jumped since we dumped the high carb ideas.:eek:hwell:

Good luck,

John
 

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I reduced my carbohydrates from about 180 down to 80 a day. I lost 35 pounds in 8 months, and 4+ years later I am down 42 pounds. I don't count calories, or worry about fat, I just count carbohydrates.

For me, that has worked with exceptional results.

-Lloyd
 
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