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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm a little confused at this so thoughts on it are greatly appreciated....
I've been reading a lot lately about high fat dairy contributing to insulin resistance.
I really don't do much high fat dairy other than using real butter and cheese, both in moderation, but have seem to have always been IR so I'm not really a good indicator.
 

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I'm not sure what you mean by high fat dairy but most milk has about 12 carbs per cup. So how do they know the IR isn't from the carbs. I routinely eat heavy cream, cheese and have great bgs but I don't drink normal milk.
 

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High fat dairy usually means butter, heavy cream or full fat yogurt. They are referring to an item that is pretty much all fat and most of the milk has been removed.

In some people, the fat in the diary produces an insulin response even though there aren't any carbs in the meal. It doesn't cause IR, it just may give some people problems with weight loss stalls.

So if you have been previously losing weight fine and are now stuck, it may be helpful to try cutting out dairy for a week. If it helps then you can slowly try adding back, usually butter first and see if you still keep losing. If it doesn't help then it's most likely not an issue for you.
 

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I do understand if you are lactose intolerant, eating dairy will cause inflammation and the inflammation may raise bgs. I'm not sure if that is the same thing as IR.
 

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Just my opinion, but:

What we have here may be a failure to communicate a definition of "Insulin Resistance".

When one has a high level of saturated fat in the blood about one half of the insulin will be used to store the fat instead of glucose so it will appear that the insulin is only half as effective at removing glucose from the blood. Is this what they are referring to as "Insulin Resistance"?

This effect is often referred to as "Insulin Resistance" on this forum when people state that their "Insulin Resistance" is higher in the morning. What is actually happening is that over night one's liver is converting excess glucose into triglyceride (saturated fat) and dumping it back into the blood stream so that one's apparent insulin response in the morning is much less to glucose because much of the insulin is being used to store the triglyceride until the excess triglyceride has been stored or consumed.

ColaJim
 
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