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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had a doc appt last Monday and he was not happy with me for being low carb.
He wants me to see a Nutritionist and she called me today to schedule an appt.
I told her I've been losing weight and my numbers are good when I eat Keto.
She said, Be aware of eating keto, its not healthy.
Instead of arguing with her I politely declined to make an appt with her and hung up.
WHERE/HOW do I find a Low Carb or Keto doctor that my health insurance will accept?
I live in Kansas City.
Thanks!
 

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WHERE/HOW do I find a Low Carb or Keto doctor that my health insurance will accept?
There may be directories or Web sites which list providers who are more friendly to low-carb or keto eating plans. But I think your best recourse is success. If you're eating LC/keto and losing weight and managing your blood glucose and your numbers are good, should your doctor care what you eat?

When I was at the point you are now. my doctor and the "diabetes educator" greeted with skepticism my belief that low-carb would work, didn't think I would stick with it, and told me to call her when I wanted to start the metformin. I smiled and nodded -- and did my thing. I had three months to prove her wrong. Four years later, all my numbers are right where they should be and my doctor considers me a poster child for BG management. "You should talk with my other patients!" "Umm, you really sure you want me to talk to them about how I did this?" :)

It did help to have information (medical studies, etc.) from this site, Diet Doctor, bloodsugar101.com, and others supporting the idea that eating keto was an appropriate response to high blood glucose levels and that eating a lot of fat was not going to give me high cholesterol or require taking statins. If you get pushback from your doctor, search this site for answers or ask; we probably can address the doctor's issues.
 

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Curious as to what he is unhappy about? If you generally like him as a doctor and don't really want to change or don't find a keto friendly doctor near you, you could bring it up next time and if he's unwilling to discuss it, you might consider finding another doctor then.. If he will take the time, check out what he has to say,, it should be easy to research. Maybe easier than finding a new doctor. I know there are some keto supportive doctors near me but I don't find them listed as such in searchable databases on line.

It is not that eating keto is unhealthy, there just aren't any long term studies that prove it is, and of course none that prove it isn't. That is because there are no long term studies comparing real keto to any other diets. What studies I'd seen a few years ago were called low carb but they weren't. What they were calling low carb would turn my blood into the glaze they put on donuts. You just really need to check out the details of studies making low carb claims. I believe the problems with increasing fats is not cutting enough carbs and the carbs are what causes the problems and mot the saturated fats.

I have a pretty good relationship with my PCP. He tells me his opinion and he listens to mine. I tell him what I want to try and he supports it, maybe in hopes it fails, but none the less he does. He prescribed me enough strips to test 5 times a day because I was testing a lot at the time. He told his NP what would it hurt, worst thing the insurance could do is say no, I got them. I know medicare won't be so generous. He even turned vegan on me a few years ago, but is still raising cattle. Last time I saw him, I told him that one of his PAs, after seeing her, sent in a prescription to double my pravastatin dose and I was wanting to cut it in half. I didn't get it filled, I had already started taking what I had every other day and when I ran out I quit and didn't want any more, He looked at my chart, laughed, and said I was going about managing cholesterol differently than most but whatever I was doing seemed to be doing OK. I've been doing it about 9 years now, so I'd say, yes, it is sustainable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'll just keep my mouth shut, continue to eat to my meter and come here to complain. 😋
You don't know how much I appreciate your help. Thank you 💐
 

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I had a doc appt last Monday and he was not happy with me for being low carb.
He wants me to see a Nutritionist and she called me today to schedule an appt.
I told her I've been losing weight and my numbers are good when I eat Keto.
She said, Be aware of eating keto, its not healthy.
Instead of arguing with her I politely declined to make an appt with her and hung up.
WHERE/HOW do I find a Low Carb or Keto doctor that my health insurance will accept?
I live in Kansas City.
Thanks!
I have heard of Keto but never actually tried it. Here’s what I did to get my A1C from a pre-diabetes level of 6.2 down to 5.1.
I reduced carbs significantly, and tested two hours after each meal. My daily numbers went down quickly, and those improvements were reflected when I had my A1C tests done.
I used Direct Labs to get A1C test requests whenever I needed them, as opposed to trying to get a doctor’s order. I did the entire diet without my doctor’s knowledge.
I ate a lot of large salads (greens, artichokes, seeds, olives), lots of vegetables, (no potatoes), and nuts,
Along with meat and fish.
The diet also had the unwanted of effect of reducing my weight substantially. When I started, I was about normal weight, and I lost about 22 pounds over the course of 6 weeks.
The diet was a lot of hard work, since I am a lover of carbs, but I decided I did not want to progress to full-blown diabetes, and thus bit the bullet, and buckled down and stuck to it.
After I got my A1C down to 5.1, I started to slowly re-introduce carbs in small quantities, such as beans, sweet potatoes. I also started eating smaller, more frequent meals per day. These days I am able to handle small to medium portions of sweet potatoes, rice, whole grains, beans without experiencing a spike. My typical glucose reading two hors after a meal is between 93 and 112, directly depending on the amount of carbs ingested.
Typical breakfast: 1 steamed sweet potato, (less than one-half pound), 1 portion Natto, Fennel, Mushrooms.
Typical mid-morning snack: ¼ cup quinoa (dry), i.e., ½ cup (cooked), along with walnuts and almonds.
Typical lunch: 4 ounces baked chicken, large green salad, ¼ cup buckwheat (dry), i.e., ½ cup (cooked).
Artichokes, pumpkin seeds, olives, olive oil and vinegar are good additions to the salad.

Typical mid-afternoon snack: oatmeal, along with walnuts and almonds.
Typical dinner: 4 ounces baked salmon, jicama, yuca, broccoli, cauliflower.
Typical evening snack: 1 banana or apple.
Note: for vegetarians, Trader Joe’s sells a frozen hi-protein veggie burger that has only 8 net carbs. It is not particularly tasty, but appears to have good nutritional value.
My A1C at last reading was 5.4, and I’m very happy with that.
It is pretty much a scientific fact that when you eliminate carbs, you eliminate the sugars that they produce in the bloodstream. This may not be the case for type 1 diabetes, but it is definitely the case for type 2.
In summary, (at least in my case) the key to getting A1C down significantly is to go on a very low-carb diet for at least 3 weeks. I stuck with it for 6. Also, eating smaller, and more frequent meals is helpful.
I’m not a doctor, so if you only take advice from doctors, you can disregard this post.
My advice is give the low-carb approach a try for a week, testing regularly. If you like the results, continue. At some point you will need to increase your carb intake. When you do so, try to spread them out as much as possible throughout the day to reduce blood sugar spikes. I’ve found Jicama to be a good food, fairly low carb, having a taste somewhat like a fruit and a potato. It can be eaten raw or steamed. Beans, natto, buckwheat, oatmeal, quinoa, sweet potatoes, are good foods that only have medium levels of carbs.
I generally eat about 4 eggs per week, and drink almond milk.

Doctors are not trained in nutrition, nor do they receive a whole lot training in disease prevention. They are trained to treat symptoms, and prescribe medications to treat those symptoms. I’ve found that diet and exercise can often be a good substitute for medications. But you have to really want to get results. As mentioned previously, I was and am still a lover of carbs. I used to enjoy eating a half pound of spaghetti with bread at a sitting, but those days are now long gone.
Zeppo
 

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Zeppo, thanks for the detailed description of your lower-carb eating plan. The one thing it underlines is that everyone reacts to foods differently. I'm glad you've found carbs that taste okay and which your body tolerates well. You actually tolerate a fair amount of carbs for someone eating low-carb!

Just curious, though -- in my experience, natto is an acquired taste. How did you acquire that taste? Do you try to eat other fermented foods?
 

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Zeppo, thanks for the detailed description of your lower-carb eating plan. The one thing it underlines is that everyone reacts to foods differently. I'm glad you've found carbs that taste okay and which your body tolerates well. You actually tolerate a fair amount of carbs for someone eating low-carb!

Just curious, though -- in my experience, natto is an acquired taste. How did you acquire that taste? Do you try to eat other fermented foods?
itissteve, Yes, I agree - everyone reacts to foods differently. I only posted my own experience as an example of what worked for me. Yes indeed, natto is an acquired taste. It took me a few weeks to adjust to the taste and smell and slimy texture, but after that I have looked forward to eating it daily for breakfast. I don't even notice the taste or smell any more. I have eaten tempeh in the past, but found it tasteless. I also eat sauerkraut (fermented). The beauty of natto is that it is high protein and low net-carb (if you throw away the dressings that come with the packets).
 

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Natto is also good for your arteries, haven't tried the actual food. I'm taking an extraction from it, natto kinase in capsule form.
 

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I can get it down if it's in front of me, but after a couple of tries I still have not acquired a taste for it. Actually, for me, the texture is more off-putting than the taste. I like lots of funky fermented things. But ... well, maybe someday again.
 

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I can get it down if it's in front of me, but after a couple of tries I still have not acquired a taste for it. Actually, for me, the texture is more off-putting than the taste. I like lots of funky fermented things. But ... well, maybe someday again.
I had trouble at first, with the taste, smell, and gooey texture. But I decided the benefits would be well worth it. I continued to consume it, and over time (many weeks), I gradually grew to like the taste. I'm happy I persisted, it is now one of the healthiest parts of my diet. Just my 2 cents.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have heard of Keto but never actually tried it. Here’s what I did to get my A1C from a pre-diabetes level of 6.2 down to 5.1.
I reduced carbs significantly, and tested two hours after each meal. My daily numbers went down quickly, and those improvements were reflected when I had my A1C tests done.
I used Direct Labs to get A1C test requests whenever I needed them, as opposed to trying to get a doctor’s order. I did the entire diet without my doctor’s knowledge.
I ate a lot of large salads (greens, artichokes, seeds, olives), lots of vegetables, (no potatoes), and nuts,
Along with meat and fish.
The diet also had the unwanted of effect of reducing my weight substantially. When I started, I was about normal weight, and I lost about 22 pounds over the course of 6 weeks.
The diet was a lot of hard work, since I am a lover of carbs, but I decided I did not want to progress to full-blown diabetes, and thus bit the bullet, and buckled down and stuck to it.
After I got my A1C down to 5.1, I started to slowly re-introduce carbs in small quantities, such as beans, sweet potatoes. I also started eating smaller, more frequent meals per day. These days I am able to handle small to medium portions of sweet potatoes, rice, whole grains, beans without experiencing a spike. My typical glucose reading two hors after a meal is between 93 and 112, directly depending on the amount of carbs ingested.
Typical breakfast: 1 steamed sweet potato, (less than one-half pound), 1 portion Natto, Fennel, Mushrooms.
Typical mid-morning snack: ¼ cup quinoa (dry), i.e., ½ cup (cooked), along with walnuts and almonds.
Typical lunch: 4 ounces baked chicken, large green salad, ¼ cup buckwheat (dry), i.e., ½ cup (cooked).
Artichokes, pumpkin seeds, olives, olive oil and vinegar are good additions to the salad.

Typical mid-afternoon snack: oatmeal, along with walnuts and almonds.
Typical dinner: 4 ounces baked salmon, jicama, yuca, broccoli, cauliflower.
Typical evening snack: 1 banana or apple.
Note: for vegetarians, Trader Joe’s sells a frozen hi-protein veggie burger that has only 8 net carbs. It is not particularly tasty, but appears to have good nutritional value.
My A1C at last reading was 5.4, and I’m very happy with that.
It is pretty much a scientific fact that when you eliminate carbs, you eliminate the sugars that they produce in the bloodstream. This may not be the case for type 1 diabetes, but it is definitely the case for type 2.
In summary, (at least in my case) the key to getting A1C down significantly is to go on a very low-carb diet for at least 3 weeks. I stuck with it for 6. Also, eating smaller, and more frequent meals is helpful.
I’m not a doctor, so if you only take advice from doctors, you can disregard this post.
My advice is give the low-carb approach a try for a week, testing regularly. If you like the results, continue. At some point you will need to increase your carb intake. When you do so, try to spread them out as much as possible throughout the day to reduce blood sugar spikes. I’ve found Jicama to be a good food, fairly low carb, having a taste somewhat like a fruit and a potato. It can be eaten raw or steamed. Beans, natto, buckwheat, oatmeal, quinoa, sweet potatoes, are good foods that only have medium levels of carbs.
I generally eat about 4 eggs per week, and drink almond milk.

Doctors are not trained in nutrition, nor do they receive a whole lot training in disease prevention. They are trained to treat symptoms, and prescribe medications to treat those symptoms. I’ve found that diet and exercise can often be a good substitute for medications. But you have to really want to get results. As mentioned previously, I was and am still a lover of carbs. I used to enjoy eating a half pound of spaghetti with bread at a sitting, but those days are now long gone.
Zeppo
A regular physician might not be trained for keto or type 2 diabetes but an endocrinologist certainly is and they give me the most problems by trying to tell me that I can eat anything. So I don't go to them anymore. The only reason that I go to the doctor is I have to if I want to use insulin.
Sounds like you did the right thing with your low carb diet. Thanks for sharing that.
 

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I had a doc appt last Monday and he was not happy with me for being low carb.
He wants me to see a Nutritionist and she called me today to schedule an appt.
I told her I've been losing weight and my numbers are good when I eat Keto.
She said, Be aware of eating keto, its not healthy.
Instead of arguing with her I politely declined to make an appt with her and hung up.
WHERE/HOW do I find a Low Carb or Keto doctor that my health insurance will accept?
I live in Kansas City.
Thanks!
I never discuss diet with my doctor. He checks my lab work regularly and as long as my numbers are good he's happy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If my weight was good and my numbers were good I wouldn't discuss my diet with him but since I am taking insulin I discuss these things with him.
 
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