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Hi,
I had issues with all my lancets. I could never get blood. As part of my release from the hospital, a nurse was assigned me and came over 2 or 4 times a week.
One of the things she brought with her the second time were one use lancets (get them on Amazon). They are extremely easy to use. Twist off the needle cover and place it where you want to get blood. You press the blue button and snap a needle come out and pierces the skin. Blood comes out. You throw the lancet away.

The Lancets come in three types 1.55 mm, 1.8 mm, 2.00 mm.

I use the 1.8 mm, your mileage will vary. BTW the brand name is McKesson.

I love them!
 

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When it becomes too blunt to work. I've had the same box of lancets for over 10 years. Likewise syringes - I last ordered about 7 years ago as it's changed every 6 weeks with the Lantus vial.
A nurse moaned at me about this but after 30 years of thrift (for the sake of good relations with my GP) and an 'experiment' involving over 30 000 injections (an no ill effects at all) I think the research has been done to justify my practice.
 

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Initially when diagnosed 4 years ago, I changed lancet after every stick. Now I might change it every couple of months, if that.
 

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Not very often. I keep the blade clean, soaked in alcohol tissue in airtight tube [a used testing strip tube] and leave it in the fridge lots of the time. Insert the blade carefully into the clicker, trying to be as clean as possible, washing hands scrupulously before all this. So far have gone months on one blade with no problems.
 

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Lancet Change

The lancet that came with the glucometer was not very good as I could never get enough blood. I stopped taking my readings because of this. I was admitted to the hospital for something other than diabetes. I was in rough shape during my hospital stay and could barely function. When the day approached to discharge me, I found out that they had assigned a nurse to me while I was at home for three days a week. The first day she showed up I tried using the lancet and couldn't get enough blood. She said I would get you a solution before the next visit. The next visit she showed up with a couple of disposable lancets. The first one we tried was the same as the old lancet, no blood. The second one I tried was great; I got plenty of blood. She told me to go on to AMAZON.com and do a search for McKesson. There are three types I chose the middle on (blue). I have been using them for eight months now, and I am extremely happy with them. I buy enough for three months so I don't have to keep reordering. They are one-time use disposable.
 

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I am not sure, but my postings disappear. I will try one last time.
I use disposable Lancets as I have deep veins. Otherwise known as a hard stick. The last time I was in the hospital and I needed an IV, the nurses could not find a vein. I had four nurses try. They finally brought in some black lights, and they found one vein. The typical lancet does not get blood for me. A nurse suggested disposable lancets. There are three varieties, typical lancet depth and deeper and deepest. They are disposable, and you don't have to worry about needles as they retract into the holder after use.
 

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The last time I was in the hospital and I needed an IV, the nurses could not find a vein. I had four nurses try..
Boy, can I relate. Not the same cause (my veins are small and roll) but results in the same problem in having to be stuck multiple times by multiple lab techs. NOT fun.

As long as my hands are warm, I don't have a problem. But if my hands are the least bit cold - no blood.
 

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I never considered warm/cold hands. I'll have to remember that.

When I am in the hospital, I have one good vein. After that, they're poking everywhere. I hated seeing them come in for blood draw every morning, and felt sorry for them and also for myself. Poke, poke, poke!
 

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As needed. Normally once or twice a week, but I need to test often. I've gone longer but a sharper lancet makes a difference for me.
 
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I change mine about twice a week when I notice they are getting dull.
 
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Just an update. Now that I test several times a day, I change the lancet at least once daily, unless I forget. I know several people who have been diabetic for years that are now having problems because they didn't regularly change needles. I don't want to be that person.
 
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@Bunjee I'm one who changes my lancet regularly, at least twice a year. Can you share what problems that person is having? I may not want to be them either!!!
 

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@Bunjee I'm one who changes my lancet regularly, at least twice a year. Can you share what problems that person is having? I may not want to be them either!!!
Hard nodules, loss of touch sensation, chronic mild pain along sides of fingers (just the fingers he regularly sticks). He says he feels hot and cold on the pads of his fingers, but has completely lost the sensations on the sides of his fingers (where he usually sticks). Doc has moved him to alternative sites for now to see if there is recovery. He always avoided the pads of his fingers because he played an instrument. Doc said it was not neuropathy from diabetes causing the problems.

One lady has discolored fingers along with the hard nodules. Apparently this doesn't typically occur with sharp needles, just dull ones. I also since found out that my late uncle kept getting small infections in his fingers because the hole in the skin from a dull needle stays open longer than from a sharp needle. He was also having control problems which increased his risk of infection.
 

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Hard nodules, loss of touch sensation, chronic mild pain along sides of fingers (just the fingers he regularly sticks). One lady has discolored fingers along with the hard nodules. Apparently this doesn't typically occur with sharp needles, just dull ones. I also since found out that my late uncle kept getting small infections in his fingers because the hole in the skin from a dull needle stays open longer than from a sharp needle.
You just convinced me!!!:surprise:
 
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