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I wonder young people suffer from diabetes for no fault of theirs. They inherit it from their generations. Is it not possible for parents to prevent it from their children. With scientific advancement and researches have we not come out a way to stop diabetes spreading to children through hereditary.
 

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I don't believe any diabetic is at fault for developing diabetes. Science still appears to be in the early stages of exploring the genetic/hereditary basis for diabetes. And, in many cases, there is no known family history -- from what I understand, that's especially true of Type 1.

So I'm afraid the answer is: No, we don't know how to prevent it.

(But if anybody has a better answer, I'd be delighted to know!)
 
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I was the first in a very large family to get Diabetes. I led a very healthy life. After I had my children I did let my weight get out of control but eventually I did lose 50+ pounds and my weight was OK for a 50 year old woman. I ate vegetarian, low fat. I exercised at least once if not twice most days. I did yoga and pilates to limit the stresses in my life. So even with all that I still got diabetes at 56. So I am not sure what I could have done to prevent it. I have 5 children and I continually tell them of their risk as they grow older. Quite frankly they don't want to hear it. I think the best thing anyone can do to prevent diabetes is to stop eating any processed food. So if anything comes in a bag or box or has more than a couple of ingredients, don't eat it. Take all the chemicals, hormones, genetically modified veggies out of your diet and you will be healthier.
 

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While I was diagnosed less than a year ago, after requesting my old labs, I have had fasting numbers > 100 since at least a teenager. If I had to guess based on symptoms I have had poor BG control since grade school. Back then I was stick skinny, ate pretty well and was an athlete. So .... anyone who tells me that I brought this upon myself can take a long walk off a short pier. :D

I honestly have no idea what my mom could have done to prevent this. I didn't eat candy or soda as a kid (or an adult). We ate meat, fruit, potatoes, some veggies and a bit of bread. It wasn't very carb or processed food heavy.

If I have children, the best I can do would be to have them eat as I do now (low carb, no grain, etc) and hope for the best. Other than that and keeping an eye out for high BG symptoms... *shrug*
 

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You worded your question differently, elsewhere, and I replied to that, too.

My kids are adopted, but all from ethnically high-risk groups: Chinese, South Asian, and Guatemalan.

The greatest risk is of type 2, in their case, but also, because they were adopted (this is true), they are also at greater risk of developing Type 1. An additional risk factor is that my eldest was a preemie. Added to that, she genetically appears to be Bengali Brahmin, one of the highest-risk ethnic groups.

What I am doing with them is:
Occasionally testing their blood sugars with my meter;

Making them aware of healthy diet that will not overstimulate their pancreas (low sugar, and, more importantly low starch);

Making it clear to them that the health guidelines they are taught in school and might hear from their friends are mistaken;

Making sure they get enough vitamin D from the sun (they are darker skinned, and in spite of the government guideline to USE sunscreen, we do not, and we get them out as often as possible to build up reserves and give supplemental D in winter);

I have them in swimming, at least 3 times per week, which keeps blood sugar and insulin secretion more stable, and controls their weight (all are quite slender, but, interestingly the adopted kids who develop T2 tend to be slender T2's!).

Most radical of all: I have been a vegetarian for 38 years, I still do not eat meat, but I have informed them that eating meat is healthier for them. Thus far 2 of the 3 have taken me up on it and my son really enjoys it. My daughter has eaten the breaded-and-fried fish sticks, at school (SIGH), but won't eat things like pork chops cooked in coconut oil that her dad offers.
 
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