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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have a suggestion on how to teach family members about Diabetes? I know those of us who have the disease try to educate ourselve with regard to diet, exercise and medicines.

My DIL has type 2 diabetes and her husband (my #1 son) says it is "her disease". I try to explain to him that she is the one who manages the diabetes, but it ends up being a family affair. Maybe I'm the one who is wrong, if so - please educate me.

My OH doesn't know that much about my diabetes either. He still thinks that the Dexcom CGMS and Medtronic Revel 723 are one and the same :(
 

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Unfortunately you can't force anyone to believe anything. You can have discussions about diabetes and the treatments, but you may come to a hard stop when she says "Well my doctor says I can eat all the pasta and rice I want" or some such thing. Many people put a lot of trust in doctors. Also, some people want to pretend they don't have diabetes and will be very resistant to even discussing it.

It's her right to not make her disease a family affair. The only thing that friends and family should do is provide lower-carb meals when hosting her. Other than that, her levels are really nobody's business but her own. If she chooses to discuss her health with you, that's different.

So I guess I'm saying that it's only a family affair if she wants to involve the family herself.
 

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Thats irritating to me, having 3 grown adults, I would still be tempted to smack one of them on the head if he/she said that to me.


Does anyone have a suggestion on how to teach family members about Diabetes? I know those of us who have the disease try to educate ourselve with regard to diet, exercise and medicines.

My DIL has type 2 diabetes and her husband (my #1 son) says it is "her disease". I try to explain to him that she is the one who manages the diabetes, but it ends up being a family affair. Maybe I'm the one who is wrong, if so - please educate me.

My OH doesn't know that much about my diabetes either. He still thinks that the Dexcom CGMS and Medtronic Revel 723 are one and the same :(
 

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May I have permission to smack mine when they continue to foist on us their real maple syrup & agave nectar? But it's NATURAL - it's good for you! Being good for me doesn't include products wholly composed of glucose and fructose! :mad:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Unfortunately you can't force anyone to believe anything. You can have discussions about diabetes and the treatments, but you may come to a hard stop when she says "Well my doctor says I can eat all the pasta and rice I want" or some such thing. Many people put a lot of trust in doctors. Also, some people want to pretend they don't have diabetes and will be very resistant to even discussing it.

It's her right to not make her disease a family affair. The only thing that friends and family should do is provide lower-carb meals when hosting her. Other than that, her levels are really nobody's business but her own. If she chooses to discuss her health with you, that's different.

So I guess I'm saying that it's only a family affair if she wants to involve the family herself.
I'm sorry if I gave you the wrong impression. I do not wish to make her business my business. My point to my son and also to my OH is - we need moral and sometimes physical support. Just telling us that it is 'our' disease does not constitute "support" IMHO.
 

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I'm with you wholeheartedly, Strawberry!!

When my father was diagnosed, my mother learned everything she could about the disease, and we all changed the way we ate. Hers was a glowing example of love and support that I thought was normal, being a kid. Now I understand that not every partner is like this, which is sad. By doing all the meal preparation and grocery shopping with his needs in mind, she probably extended his life, and definitely contributed to a healthier life.

Even if a partner isn't a traditional homemaker, s/he can still do a lot to support a diabetic: keep certain foods out of the house, make diabetic meal-planning a priority, learn what your partner is doing so you can talk intelligently about it, support your partner's exercise schedule and routine, give hugs when the going gets tough. An added bonus is the example this sets for the kids -- both about what partners do for each other, and how you take care of your health when faced with a serious illness. It's the definition of taking care of each other "in sickness and in health."
 

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From what I've read on this and other diabetes forums, many get more support from other diabetics online than from family members.

I have found, personally, that other "real" people I meet who have diabetes also have complications and eat anything and everything. They are not pleased to have me offer an alternative way of control, which might mean they have to change the way they eat.

I have also met people who say they are sensitive or intolerant to gluten, but who continue to eat gluten-laden foods because they don't want to give them up.

It seems to be human nature to not want others telling us what to do, even if it's only a perception and the other person is trying to help.
 

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I may be wrong but I think women and men approach this disease differently. My husband is also diabetic, a lot longer than me. He pretends he doesn't have it. Whenever I talk about my diabetes he tries to change the subject. Since I do the cooking he does eat low carb around me but when he has to make his own choices he eats whatever he wants. When we were in Maine over the holidays the first thing he bought was Maine Real Maple Syrup. I've tried for many years to educate him about bgs, medications and diabetes management it just doesn't work. So I do my thing and he does his. I wish I had a better answer. I think some of us want to know exactly what we are dealing with so we can control it. Others take the opposite approach and pretend it doesn't exist.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
May I have permission to smack mine when they continue to foist on us their real maple syrup & agave nectar? But it's NATURAL - it's good for you! Being good for me doesn't include products wholly composed of glucose and fructose! :mad:

As far as I'm concerned......"permission granted" ;) Be gentle though :)
 
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I may be wrong but I think women and men approach this disease differently. My husband is also diabetic, a lot longer than me. He pretends he doesn't have it. Whenever I talk about my diabetes he tries to change the subject. Since I do the cooking he does eat low carb around me but when he has to make his own choices he eats whatever he wants. When we were in Maine over the holidays the first thing he bought was Maine Real Maple Syrup. I've tried for many years to educate him about bgs, medications and diabetes management it just doesn't work. So I do my thing and he does his. I wish I had a better answer. I think some of us want to know exactly what we are dealing with so we can control it. Others take the opposite approach and pretend it doesn't exist.
My husband is not diabetic although his Mother was Type 2 in her later years. Every day he has a large bowl of ice cream right after lunch before he leaves for work. Most of the time I try to avoid being in the same room while he eats it.......I guess because I wish I could have some too. I try to suggest to him that he is at 'risk' for diabetes because of his Mother, but mostly he ignores me.
 
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I may be wrong but I think women and men approach this disease differently. My husband is also diabetic, a lot longer than me. He pretends he doesn't have it. Whenever I talk about my diabetes he tries to change the subject. Since I do the cooking he does eat low carb around me but when he has to make his own choices he eats whatever he wants. When we were in Maine over the holidays the first thing he bought was Maine Real Maple Syrup. I've tried for many years to educate him about bgs, medications and diabetes management it just doesn't work. So I do my thing and he does his. I wish I had a better answer. I think some of us want to know exactly what we are dealing with so we can control it. Others take the opposite approach and pretend it doesn't exist.
Jen ... so how'd we both end up with the same husband???

I've pretty much given up on educating relatives. They try, really they do, but when I say "low-carb," my parents-in-law hear "low-fat with lots of fruit." This is not gonna change.

So for now, we've simply agreed that my diet requirements are waaayyy too complex to be reasonably accommodated by any mere mortal. Therefore, I'll eat what I can, and if I can't eat anything, that's my problem! As long as they're assured I'm not starving myself otherwise, they're fine with that. Makes my life much easier ... as long as I make sure I never show up hungry.
 

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I wish I could get my family to understand as well. My hubby and daughter love their pizza, pasta, potatoes, ice cream, cakes, etc. Not a lot of help there.
 

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I find that I can't preach to my father in law about it. He follows what his doctor says, and he takes insulin so he worries about lows. I'm pre-diabetic, and use only diet to control my BG.

What I CAN do is remark once in a while about how cutting back on "starches and sugars" (to avoid the "low carb" term) has really helped me control my blood sugar, and how I don't have the spikes I used to, and how my A1C has dropped.

Only once in a while, because I don't want to preach. And only talking about my particular examples because... well, he can't argue with what works for me, but he could argue if I suggested that he do it.

I figure over time if I plant a few seeds, and water them once in a while, he might ask for more information.
 
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