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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was diagnosed with Alzheimer's. It is easier just to call it AD.

I have found out that it is "still in the closet." Once I was diagnosed, I am now incompetent in legal terms. It is a good thing that I made out my Advance Directive several years ago. I have named my husband to make any medical decisions when I cannot.

Everyone should have an Advance Directive. You never know when you are unconscious or something will happen that you cannot make medical decisions for yourself.

I am in the early stage of AD. My neurologist is trying medications to find one that will slow it down. Sometimes, it can be kept in the early stage for years. There is no cure.

People do not like to talk about it. They do not want other people knowing that they have AD. All of my friends know that I have it. I am not going to stay "in the closet."

That is why I have been away. I forget a lot, including how to find my email address.

I hope you understand and will remain my friends.

Please give me your feedback about how to remember to test for my blood sugar. I keep forgetting to do that.

Ruth
 

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I am extremely sorry about your diagnosis ... but I'm also inspired by your decision to keep "out of the closet."

Thanks for the great advice about the Advance Directive!

Please know that we're all here for you.
 
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Ruth, I'm very sorry to hear of your diagnosis. My mom has alzheimer's and with medication stayed in the early stage for years. She's now middle stage, but has a very positive attitude and enjoys her life.

I moderate a mailing list that is for people with dementia (all types), and will send you information about it in case you're interested. There's also a wonderful organization with a mailing list DASNI: Dementia Advocacy and Support Network International that is for people with early stage dementia. A very close friend of mine was diagnosed with early-onset when she was 50, is now 65 and also enjoying her life. I'm so glad you realize life doesn't end because you have Alzheimers!

A man who was on a list I frequent has been inspirational to so many. He has had Alzheimer's for about 10 years, and is still writing his blog. You can read some of his past newsletters here - Newsletters | Richard Taylor Ph.D. | My Story: Alzheimer's From the Inside Out - and sign up for them if you'd like.

Sending hugs across the wires.
 
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My heart goes out to you, Ruth; you are very brave and I admire your courage in telling all your friends. I am sure those who are your 'real life' friends will be just as supportive as those on this forum are proving to be.
 

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Ruth, thanks for your openness. I feel I speak for most of us when I say we're here for you and wish you all the best. If there's anything I can do to help, let me know. You are a real example of courage and spirit to the rest of us in telling us and being so open.

Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
My heart goes out to you, Ruth; you are very brave and I admire your courage in telling all your friends. I am sure those who are your 'real life' friends will be just as supportive as those on this forum are proving to be.
Hi Everyone,

I do not feel brave or have courage in telling my friends. When I was diagnosed with epilepsy at the age of 6, it was still "in the closet." Now, it is not. I told everyone.

I remember when my grandfather had diabetes, it was "in the closet", then. He remained "in the closet."

You are right, this is when you find out who your real friends and what support groups want you. Three support groups have dropped me.

My real life friends are very supportive and have not left my side. I am glad that you all are very supportive.

I have gone to two support groups for Alzheimer's and I have found out that the caregivers want nothing to do with the clients. Only a nurse or a moderator will talk to me. The caregiver's main problem is the legal matters. They did not take care of it when the loved one was in the early stage. They should have talked to their loved one and found out what their wishes were, when the last stages happen. That would be when they would no longer be able to tell their wishes.

Everyone should have an Advance Directive even if they have no health problem. You never know when something unforeseen will happen. Then you are in a hospital and cannot express your wishes. Without it, the hospital does what they think is in your best wishes.

My husband is healthy and refuses to have one. No one in his family will be able to help him if something happens. I am now legally incompenet (sp?) to have any say.

Here is an important link:

http://www.ahaf.org/alzheimers/livingwith/legalmatters.html

I just looked up my "likes" and found out that I had put this thread in last July. I am sorry, I really do not remember. I hope you will overlook my repeats, confusion and forgetfulness. I do appreciate your support here.

Ruth
 

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Hi Ruth, glad to see you around again. Post things as many times as you like, we don't mind.

as for remembering to test your blood sugar, maybe set an alarm? that works for me
 

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If your meter allows it, set an alarm on that. Also, if you have a smartphone, set alarms on that. Just use a logbook so that you don't accidentally take extra doses.

Keep us up to date and post as often as you need or want.
 

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I just looked up my "likes" and found out that I had put this thread in last July. I am sorry, I really do not remember. I hope you will overlook my repeats, confusion and forgetfulness.
I actually like the way you use language. You also tend to do your paragraphs the way I do. The damage can't be very advanced for you, or maybe it is for me. :)

I'm sure we all have things that could benefit from people overlooking them. There is no such thing as normal anyway, so not much point in worrying about differences.

In my experience on projects, different views become strengths when hearts are in the right places.

My mother had Alzheimer's and I haven't had much of a memory for 30 years. That is supposed to be an indication that it could happen to me too. But a couple of things I've learned about memory might help.

The only thing you really have to remember is that you are going to forget, so take care of whatever you are thinking about, or make a reminder.

Staying organized and busy are both big helps. The busy part is because while I am going around the house, I will be reminded of things I forgot to do. Having a well organized kitchen or desk helps me remember where everything is.

best wishes
 

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With a parent and a grandparent now both dead from Alzheimer's, I view this as a real possibility for myself but of course I'm hoping not. Allow you to tell me what I tell (and will tell) myself in case there is a benefit.

It turns out that just like diabetes, there are very real findings (still preliminary but significant) on easy and med-free ways to treat Alzheimer's. In both cases, these methods leave no opportunity for profit-making and so get very little attention or funding except the occasional government-sponsored research. In both cases, you are extremely unlikely to ever hear abou them from any healthcare professional.

The good news is that they are both ONE AND THE SAME SOLUTION.

Get on a full Ketogenic Diet as soon as you can and stay on it. The problem in the brain is a problem with glucose. It started many years ago. The brain (nerve) cells had the same inability to uptake and utilize glucose that your peripheral cells had which in that case we call "diabetes". Over many years, this caused degneration of these cells/tissues in the brain and this results in Alzheimer's.

After about three weeks on the KD (no exceptions or slip-ups), 90% of your brain cells will be "liberated" from the glucose problem and will be running more efficiently than ever on ketones. Continue longer and virtually all of the brain will be converted and the problem circumvented. This will have immediate benefit in terms of short term memory, etc. and there is a good chance that actual healing (regeneration) will also take place at least partially reversing the condition.

Oh, and BTW, this is the best possible course for maintaining normal blood sugar at the same time. It is unlikely you will need any meds or insulin as long as you keep doing this.

Be sure to include lots of virgin coconut oil in your diet as it is more prone to producing ketones than any other fat making it easier to get into and maintain ketosis, the state needed by your brain.

I know this sounds like it is from left field and your doctors are telling you completely other things and testing all kinds of chemicals on you. Believe me, or research for yourself. Here are some words to include in your searches:

Dr. Veech
NIH
ketones
type 3 diabetes
alzheimer's
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hi Everyone,

Thank you for your support. I have learned what it is like to have AD.

I have good news!!

I was misdiagnosed!! My neurologist did not do a contrast MRI. Therefore, he could not see if I had any plaques or tau tangles in my brain. I thought he did a contrast MRI.

I was in ICU for seizures. My regular doctor decided to do a contrast MRI. It was the longest MRI that I have ever had. Then he did another one the next morning. He wanted to make sure of the results.

He told me that no plaques or tau tangles showed up in the two MRI's that he did. He told me that I do not have AD.

I have MCI, Memory Cognitive Inpairment. That is no where at all from having AD.

I appreciate your support. I know who my friends are. I am welcome here!! I am not going back to the support groups that dropped me or tell them that I do not have AD.

I have learned what it is like living with AD. I really feel for those who have AD. People want to keep them "in the closet." There are very few people who do not stay "in the closet." I understand why!!

I thank you again for your continued support for me and everyone else who is in the forum.

Ruth
 

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Best news I've heard all day!!!

Wooo-Hooo!
:cheer2::cheer2::cheer2:
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thank you very much Shaynne, foxl and 1970clea.

I wanted to add that I changed my diet to a partial gluten-free diet. AD is caused by an excess of glutamate in the brain. I have only gone on a partial diet because our brains do need glutamate.

Ruth
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thank you foxl!! I looked it up and read it. I went to their home page and signed up to see them. I live in CA and they are in CA. It will not be hard for me to see them.

I went to HealthNOW Medical Center | Multidisciplinary Medical Center.

I hope everyone here looks it up. I learned a lot more from them and they are able to help anyone who wants help. I asked for their help.

I will keep everyone updated.

Thank you for the Video, I found it very helpful.

Ruth
 
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