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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, for right now, I can achieve normal glucose numbers by diet alone, but I am pretty sure a large part of that is because I am breastfeeding. When I wean this little guy (not for a long time), or when he starts nursing less...it's possible I may not have the same control by diet alone.

I was on glyburide while pregnant and it worked great, but it makes your pancreas work harder, so am I burning through those beta cells anyway?

I've tried Metformin in the past, regular and XR, and won't do it again.

ActoPlus Met is another I want to avoid b/c of the heart disease implications.

I know there are ton more medications out there and everyone is different. I have been insulin resistant since I was young, and diagnosed type 2 a year ago. I am very natural-minded, and prefer to avoid unnecessary medication, but if I need something, I need something... so would insulin be the best course? Even though it seems like a lot of type 2s try to avoid it and use oral medications first... to me, I wonder if it would be the way to go. It wouldn't stress out my pancreas or give me any additional side effects like heart problems or B12 deficiency or stomach pains.... is there a downside to insulin? Is my train of thought correct?

It's entirely possible I may always be able to control this with diet alone. I just want to have an idea for when I meet with my endo and when the issue comes up. Know my options and how all the different medications work, etc.

Thanks :D
 

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When I was diagnosed as a "presumable" Type 2, my choices were insulin ... or insulin. At first I balked, felt like a failure, etc.

But combining a longer-acting and faster-acting insulin has given me much more flexibility than I would have had otherwise. (Not perfect control, but pretty good, most of the time.)

Self-injecting still feels bizarre, not sure why. But it's easier and less painful than testing. I don't even want to switch to oral meds anymore. Unless they come up with chocolate-flavored insulin, that is! :D

If other meds don't work for you, don't fear the insulin!
 

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Very well thought-out, and it's the conclusion I've come to myself as well - for when the time comes. You have given this a lot of thought.

I think preserving beta cells is a pretty high priority, so I wouldn't want to try any sulfonylureas, but since I've done well on metformin, I would continue that & the same diet regimen, and just add insulin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
See, I was thinking about the flexibility too... I'm good most of the time, but if I wanted to have a little bit of carbs, wouldn't insulin give me that adjustability? Not that I'd take advantage of it, like one of our friends does (eats whatever he wants b/c he can counteract with insulin).

When I think of all the other meds, it's "doing" something to my body... but insulin is just extra insulin in my bloodstream without stressing the pancreas...as far as I understand it.

I had asked my doc a few times if it would be better to do insulin while PG, but since my control was stellar with the glyburide, we didn't want to mess with it. More recent tests have found no sign of glyburide in the cord blood of babies, so I was assured of it's safety for the baby. It was certainly easier to just pop a pill.... but looking at the long term here, insulin seems to be a good choice. I wasn't sure if there was a reason to avoid it or if it had some side effects I wasn't sure of.
 

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Can't speak for anyone else, but while it doesn't give me anywhere near the flexibility I'd love to have ... without it, I'd have none at all. Other folks enjoy much more. (My learning curve just might be behind some of that.)

As for side effects, Number One is possible lows (hypos). Your doc or educator should start you low and slow, and gradually teach you to make dose adjustments as you need them.

Otherwise, the only side-effect I've heard of is allergic reactions to different formulations.

Different insulins each have their own behaviors, as well.

If glyburide still gives you good control and lets you live your life, too, you may want to stick with it. In the end, that's what it's all about.
 
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my opinion having had both oral meds and insulin is I think insulin is way better :D Despite my hiccups and trying to figure things out.... at least I know with insulin it's not stressing out my pancreas or giving me the nasty side effects that I got with oral meds. If I had my time over I'd rather be on the insulin and not oral meds.
Shalynne... I think your doc did a good thing with putting you straight on it.
Another thing is I don't personally think there has been enough study done on the long term side effects of the oral meds that they give you. I better not say more as you can all guess what I'm referring to.
I should also add that I think that endo/docs need to be testing type 2 people regularly as to what state their pancreas is in. If it's not producing enough insulin, then oral meds are useless. That's what was happening with me. I think on that note that is why I should have been placed on insulin a lot sooner too. Oral meds is only suitable for a short term I think.
 

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I would imagine with the addition of fast acting insulin you do have the flexibility of eating more carbs than with orals alone. If you are insulin resistant you might find you need a lot more insulin to lower bgs, especially if you eat carbs. A lot of IR diabetics also have to use an oral drug like Metformin in addition to the insulin.
 

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I think so. When I have done all else, weight loss, lowering my carb intake, exercising, lowering my coffee intake, maxing on metformin ... when my BG spikes unexpectedly, it is a huge relief that insulin can bring me quickly back down. Life is less distressing without that feeling of helplessness -- and from my response to coffee ... distress is not good for my BGs.

I do have antibodies, but I respond to T2D's because in the end, all we really have, all of us, is "clinical management," ie, try-it-and-see. I also respond because part of my regimen includes the philosophy of minimizing insulin use.
 
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