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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All

My name is Derek Melly and I live in Nicosia, Cyprus as an expat. I have recently been diagnosed with type 2 and I guess that like all of you it has come as a major shock to me especially the fact that it seems that I will have to change my lifestyle somewhat. I am on Glucophage to try to regulate my sugar level having tried Januvia. I wanted to raise a few things which hopefully I will get some useful feedback on as I find doctors don't really know as much as other diabetics do. The first is that I am reacting badly to the Glucophage in terms of diarrhoea, gas and occasional cramps. The second is that although my sugar levels are well controlled during the day I find they are still too high on waking in the morning and again after breakfast (having tried different recommended foods for breakfast). Lastly, and quite extraordinarily I find that if I drink a few tots of Vodka and diet coke this brings my sugar level right down to normal levels within a very short space of time (unfortunately I obviously cannot drink Vodka for breakfast). Any comments as far as my personal experience is concerned?
Thanks
Derek
 

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Hello Derek: :)

Nice to see you. Welcome to our community.

Unfortunately, the gastric symptoms which you are experiencing are common side-effects for most(but not all)Diabetics, when using Glucophage. Some need to decrease their dosage(by their Dr.'s advice only), just put up with the symptoms or change to a different medication prescribed by their Dr.

Using the slow-release or extended release of Glucophage, may help in the lessening of the gastric symptoms and aid in lowering the higher blood sugars.

Alcohol is addictive and is not a Good idea for Diabetics to consume in large amounts since it is high in carbs(fattening), can dangerously lower blood sugar, cause liver damage and may increase the risk of lactic acidosis. These of course, vary from Person to Person.

Some Diabetics do have an alcoholic drink at night to lower their morning blood sugar(DP). This does not work for everyone however. Some Diabetic's on oral meds. and Insulin have died from having one too many. Alcohol shuts down the liver so that it cannot give out the needed glucose to raise the blood sugar to aa safe level.

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"Alcohol can damage nerve cells; even light drinking can cause nerve damage. For diabetics with nerve damage drinking can increase the pain, numbness, tingling or burning sensation associated with diabetic nerve damage.

For diabetics with eye disease symptoms, heavy drinking can make the condition worse and heavy drinking is defined as three or more drinks during one day. Diabetics who also have high blood pressure should also not drink alcohol.

Alcohol can also increase the amount of triglycerides in the blood. Even very light drinking, defined as two drinks a week, can increase triglyceride levels. Diabetics who have high triglycerides should not drink alcohol at all."


by the ADA
 

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Hello Derek, welcome to Diabetes Forum. Your morning higs are probably due to "Dawn Phenomenon"' When you do not eat for a long period of tim, like when you are sleeping, you liver dumps glucose into your system and this raises your blood sugar level. Some diabetics find they can eat a high protein snack at bedtime and this provides glucose that lasts well into the night and the liver does not dump additional glucose. This does not work for everyone. Let us know what happens if you try the protein snack. Some people eat a good portion of peanut butter or cheese.

I have been diabetic (type 1) for 63 years and I am very healthy. I never developed an alcohol or smoking habit and I think it is best to leave them alone. That is just my personal opinion. Many of my friends drink alcohol and some have had hypos because of that. Alcohol can then cause high blood sugar later on, so I have heard. Good luck to you!

Richard
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi Terry

Thanks for coming back to me. I will look into the slow release Glucophage and see how it goes. No need to worry about the alcohol as I do not take much of it. One or a maximum of two tots with diet coke is more than sufficient for me anyway.

Take care.
Derek


Hello Derek: :)

Nice to see you. Welcome to our community.

Unfortunately, the gastric symptoms which you are experiencing are common side-effects for most(but not all)Diabetics, when using Glucophage. Some need to decrease their dosage(by their Dr.'s advice only), just put up with the symptoms or change to a different medication prescribed by their Dr.

Using the slow-release or extended release of Glucophage, may help in the lessening of the gastric symptoms and aid in lowering the higher blood sugars.

Alcohol is addictive and is not a Good idea for Diabetics to consume in large amounts since it is high in carbs(fattening), can dangerously lower blood sugar, cause liver damage and may increase the risk of lactic acidosis. These of course, vary from Person to Person.

Some Diabetics do have an alcoholic drink at night to lower their morning blood sugar(DP). This does not work for everyone however. Some Diabetic's on oral meds. and Insulin have died from having one too many. Alcohol shuts down the liver so that it cannot give out the needed glucose to raise the blood sugar to aa safe level.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Alcohol can damage nerve cells; even light drinking can cause nerve damage. For diabetics with nerve damage drinking can increase the pain, numbness, tingling or burning sensation associated with diabetic nerve damage.

For diabetics with eye disease symptoms, heavy drinking can make the condition worse and heavy drinking is defined as three or more drinks during one day. Diabetics who also have high blood pressure should also not drink alcohol.

Alcohol can also increase the amount of triglycerides in the blood. Even very light drinking, defined as two drinks a week, can increase triglyceride levels. Diabetics who have high triglycerides should not drink alcohol at all."


by the ADA
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi Richard

Thanks for your input. I will immedaitely try the high protein snack and see how it goes. I also heard from another site that I should try a biscuit or half a slice of bread at night which works for some diabetics. I did not do so, fearing that because bread in particular causes my sugar levels to rocket it would be better to stay away from this.

One thing I am beginning to understand is the fact that it is definitely a case of "different strokes for different folks" with this "disease" in that what works for one may not work for another.

Take care.
Derek

Hello Derek, welcome to Diabetes Forum. Your morning higs are probably due to "Dawn Phenomenon"' When you do not eat for a long period of tim, like when you are sleeping, you liver dumps glucose into your system and this raises your blood sugar level. Some diabetics find they can eat a high protein snack at bedtime and this provides glucose that lasts well into the night and the liver does not dump additional glucose. This does not work for everyone. Let us know what happens if you try the protein snack. Some people eat a good portion of peanut butter or cheese.

I have been diabetic (type 1) for 63 years and I am very healthy. I never developed an alcohol or smoking habit and I think it is best to leave them alone. That is just my personal opinion. Many of my friends drink alcohol and some have had hypos because of that. Alcohol can then cause high blood sugar later on, so I have heard. Good luck to you!

Richard
 

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Hello:

"different strokes for different folks". Yes, that's another way of neatly describing the ins and outs of Diabetes.

I hope that you are testing enough each day so you can see more often how things in your Life are affecting you. Try anything that is reasonable. Diabetes is definitely a trial and error disease. And what may work one day is not etched in stone. Let us know how things go for you.
 
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