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Hi, my screen name is Romance (an anagram of my real name), and I do not have diabetes, though everyone else in my family has type 2 diabetes and high BMI, as well. I believe I’ve avoided it by regular exercise, avoiding sweets (sodas and sweetened drinks especially), portion control, and adoption of a reasonable, balanced diet. I avoid foods with a high glycemic load (mainly processed starches), and mainly adhere to the Harvard University balanced food plate and pyramid (not the USDA pyramid). At age 58, I am much healthier than my friends who insist on a LCHF diet, and I find it easier to stick to mine.

I changed my food habits in 2003, and I’m very happy with the wide variety of foods I eat; I’m not ON a diet, I maintain a healthy diet. I think glycemic load is far more important than glycemic index, and the science agrees with me. However, I find that most people disagree, and wonder why.
 

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What is the definition of glycemic load, as opposed to GI.

If by glycemic load you mean total amount of glucose ingested at a given time, then I would agree that it is important. Isn't that what we are figuring when we count carbs?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What is the definition of glycemic load, as opposed to GI.

If by glycemic load you mean total amount of glucose ingested at a given time, then I would agree that it is important. Isn't that what we are figuring when we count carbs?
Glycemic load estimates the amount one’s blood sugar is raised by eating a serving of that food; this can differ substantially from the glycemic index. Potatoes have a high GI, and a high GL, whereas carrots have a medium GI, but a very low glycemic load.
 

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Those of us with diabetes use our meters to measure the rise in BG. It is more accurate than an estimate.

I can understand why someone who has no need yet to test BG would need to use an estimate as a guide. But you're going to find that most of the members on this forum use their meter for this purpose.
 

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I'm having trouble comparing my diet as a diabetic with high insulin resistance, to one of someone without diabetes who wants to avoid it.

The issue of diabetes prevention isn't something we discuss a lot here because, well, the horse is already out of the barn. And apart from an extreme low-carb diet, I don't see how diet could prevent diabetes. Even not smoking can't prevent lung cancer, though it gives one a much better chance!

So - your issues would be different from ours, and surely you have many more choices with your diet than I have with mine if I want to manage my diabetes in the healthiest way possible.
 

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Sometimes when I read a post, it brings something else to mind that I feel like I should throw into the mix, and this is one of those times.

Everyone in my immediate family has type 2 except my daughter. She is a teacher and sometimes asks the school nurse to test her fasting bg. The last two times she tested, it was 92. I'm a little concerned about that because the blood sugar 101 website, which is a very reliable source of information says this:

What is a Normal Blood Sugar?

"several studies suggest that people whose fasting blood sugar is over 92 mg/dl (5.1 mmol/L) are more likely to be diagnosed with diabetes over the next decade."

Of course my daughter is in the 'safe' zone, but just barely. The just barely part is what is worrisome to me.

Thought I'd mention this because since there is so much type 2 in your family, you might want to borrow a meter occasionally and test your fasting bg.

P.S. fellow members: yes, I know meters aren't that accurate.
 

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Romance,

You seem to be a caring person. I was going to suggest you read Blood Sugar 101 with the idea that you will gain a better understanding of diabetes control. If your diabetic relatives are open to learning a better way to control their diabetes, a way that will ensure a more healthy life, free from diabetes complications, they would be quite fortunate to have you help them. Even if you don't have diabetes yourself, you certainly can learn about it, and about using one's meter to test, rather than rely on some formula without checking the results.
 

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Hi romance,

Good for you for trying to prevent. But sometimes there is no prevention. You just get it. But possibly by eating your type of diet it delays the onset. He'res hoping it works! Another thing to look into are the fats you eat, the levels of B12, vitD, in your body, magnesium you consume. There are many possible causes of diabetes. Magnesium deficiency for example has been pointed out as a possible cause. Eating natural fats like animal fats and avoiding seed oils/vegetable oil can also help in your quest for health.
If you want to catch it early, then look at your fasting BG every year and make sure its not creeping up into the 90's. Another thing you can do is check your fasting insulin levels every year. If they are greater than 5, then be wary. Also read Atkins books on diabetes. He has a chapter and nice summary table on the progression of carb intolerance and what to look for. Initial signs of carb intolerance are listed, as well as later signs that would show up in your insulin levels, all the way on up to high post meal numbers, then high fasting numbers.
This owuld not have helped me for example as my fasting insulin was low, therefore no insulin resistnce. But it can help many, and could be an early sign for you.

Good luck on your searching and your quest for health.

If you want to read more about why LC is healthy, try something like Mark Sisson's the primal Blueprint. He lays out why he thinks its healthy in nice and easy to understand terms. It was a fun read.
For LCHF, you can try "the art and science of carbohydrate living"
 
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