The Diabetes Forum Support Community For Diabetics Online banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I am starting to have a better understanding about my diabetes, how to take care of myself, take my meds.., etc. :blabla:

I know in some cases diet and exercise just aren't enough and medications play a big part in controlling the sugar levels. But I also know that the meds affect the liver down the line. Is that not why we are required to get that checked every so often?

I work with an organization that issues medication equipment (DME) to people who need it and can't afford it. A lot of my clients are diagnosed with End Stage Renal Disease and have gotten to that point because of diabetes. Some because they simply do not take care of themselves and others because of the medication. I can't help but wonder if we're all headed toward a similar path?

I had also read a blog posted here that mentioned diabetes is something that will never go away and is more than likely going to be listed on our death certificates as the "cause of death". It saddens me to think that this is the "knowing" part of how I'm going to leave this world.

Isn't there anything positive from any of this? Are the success stories about losing half your body mass from diet and exercise or getting bariatric surgery resulting in diabetes/other health problems going away a myth?

I guess I've just been bombarded with so much negative lately I almost need to hear something positive.

Sorry if I was a bit dramatic...just freaking out on the reality of all this...


--Jen
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
497 Posts
I think the same things all the time, I agree. It is very hard to look at the bright side. Then I see my wife and kids and think "Day by day". If diabetes takes my life in 5, 10, 15, 20 years then I have to know I lived it and my family is happy. All I can do is fight the fight and know that I antied up and played my hand the best I could.

So basically, dwelling is the worst thing for you, worst than diabetes but it is hard to stop.

But in saying that, it is always in the back of my mind, always. Complications is the word I always say to myself. My Dad lost his leg 10 years ago from diabetes but he has alway had circulation problems, he had an artery replaced 6 years before diabetes finished it off. He is on the road to losing his other leg though. But his sugars are always over 10 and he has heart disease and only 30% of his heart working. Is that from diabetes? I have no idea.
 
  • Like
Reactions: foxl

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,394 Posts
I know nothing of a blog saying such things about diabetes, but I can say with absolute assurance that diabetes is the best thing that could have happened to me. If not for this diagnosis, I would still be cruising along eating everything that was bad for me. I was never a junk food person, but I was a huge carboholic. And I would have continued down that path until my feet fell off, my kidneys failed and blindness took my eyes.

Now I have no intention of losing any of those things. I control my diabetes and I fully expect to get hit by a bus before I ever die of diabetes. They can put whatever they damn well please on my death certificate, but diabetes won't get me.

This is not a death sentence. It is a challenge - of course - but it is not a death sentence or even a guarantee of complications.

We have many things to overcome, not the least of which is the ADA and their warped ideas. But we can spread the real word as much as possible of how to manage successfully, and live long healthy lives in spite of diabetes.

Control is the key.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for sharing Paul. I have my husband and my kids too. I think of them everyday which keeps me strong and determined. At the same time I can't help but think one day I may have to leave them before my time and that alone crushes me.

I guess what I'm saying is I'm scared to fight a battle that cannot be won. I also get so angry at myself thinking "all of this is my fault". I made poor decisions and now I'm paying for it. I will be paying for it the rest of my life, however long that may be. It also upsets me to think that the medications are are saving me now will probably me killing me later. The irony.

Your right, I don't need to dwell. Bringing more negative energy and thoughts will do me more wrong than right. But just as you said, it will always be lingering in the back of my mind.

I think the same things all the time, I agree. It is very hard to look at the bright side. Then I see my wife and kids and think "Day by day". If diabetes takes my life in 5, 10, 15, 20 years then I have to know I lived it and my family is happy. All I can do is fight the fight and know that I antied up and played my hand the best I could.

So basically, dwelling is the worst thing for you, worst than diabetes but it is hard to stop.

But in saying that, it is always in the back of my mind, always. Complications is the word I always say to myself. My Dad lost his leg 10 years ago from diabetes but he has alway had circulation problems, he had an artery replaced 6 years before diabetes finished it off. He is on the road to losing his other leg though. But his sugars are always over 10 and he has heart disease and only 30% of his heart working. Is that from diabetes? I have no idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
497 Posts
Day by day and after you go day to day, live in the moment, those feeling start to come down a bit. Try meditating or reading books about mindfulness, it helped me.

remember though, it os not your fault, it is one of those things in life that get thrown at us. I blamed myself for awhile, a long while but realized that is is just another raodblock to bust through. The battle can be won, and everyday is a new battle and at the end of it you will have won more battles than diabetes, so that means you won the war.

I too am always looking for the success stories of a Type 2 who lived 40 years! I have yet to find one but I do know this, my Dad has had bad contorl for a long time and he has had it 15 years.
 

·
WHAT, I got D
Joined
·
3,849 Posts
Blunt as possible, what are you talking about, might as well throw up the white flag and say come get me, get me I give up. Is that the way you want to live your life. D is not a death sentence, its something that is right in front of you, its controllable and you determine the out come. You have no control over if a bus decides to run you over, but you do have control over this disease. I was circling the drain a time or two from this disease, but I never felt it was going to take me with a out a fight.

Its were you are working that scares you. You see a lot of people that had relaxed control and you see the end product of that relaxed control. Control is the key word. If diet and exercise do not work for you, go straight to insulin.





So, I am starting to have a better understanding about my diabetes, how to take care of myself, take my meds.., etc. :blabla:

I know in some cases diet and exercise just aren't enough and medications play a big part in controlling the sugar levels. But I also know that the meds affect the liver down the line. Is that not why we are required to get that checked every so often?

I work with an organization that issues medication equipment (DME) to people who need it and can't afford it. A lot of my clients are diagnosed with End Stage Renal Disease and have gotten to that point because of diabetes. Some because they simply do not take care of themselves and others because of the medication. I can't help but wonder if we're all headed toward a similar path?

I had also read a blog posted here that mentioned diabetes is something that will never go away and is more than likely going to be listed on our death certificates as the "cause of death". It saddens me to think that this is the "knowing" part of how I'm going to leave this world.

Isn't there anything positive from any of this? Are the success stories about losing half your body mass from diet and exercise or getting bariatric surgery resulting in diabetes/other health problems going away a myth?

I guess I've just been bombarded with so much negative lately I almost need to hear something positive.

Sorry if I was a bit dramatic...just freaking out on the reality of all this...


--Jen
 
  • Like
Reactions: Shanny

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,795 Posts
reverie, it simply is not your fault. It's a gift of our genes. You see the results of bad self care, not good control. Even if some of them did try to eat as they were told, and took the meds properly, if they followed the ADA diet, this could well be the result. Today, we know better and you'll do just fine if you fight the battle and low carb and do a lot of testing until you know your body and eat to your meter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Not throwing in the white flag. Fighting is what I'm doing and planning to do as long as I can. The reference to the clients wasn't just that they didn't take care of themselves there are also those that did and the medications eventually took a toll on them.

I know that life is full of surprises and that any day can be your last. This is very new to me and its starring me in the face. I'm sure that others at one given point whether they have diabetes or other diseases have thought about what I've said time and time again.

I just have a wave of emotions and I didn't mean to come off as "weak" or "throwing up the white flag". I intend to fight and do what I need to do. I just need to believe there is something more. Thanks for your response. :eek:

Blunt as possible, what are you talking about, might as well throw up the white flag and say come get me, get me I give up. Is that the way you want to live your life. D is not a death sentence, its something that is right in front of you, its controllable and you determine the out come. You have no control over if a bus decides to run you over, but you do have control over this disease. I was circling the drain a time or two from this disease, but I never felt it was going to take me with a out a fight.

Its were you are working that scares you. You see a lot of people that had relaxed control and you see the end product of that relaxed control. Control is the key word. If diet and exercise do not work for you, go straight to insulin.
 

·
WHAT, I got D
Joined
·
3,849 Posts
Its a fight worth fighting for. You have a good attitude and I am sorry if I came across to boldly.

You see when I was Dxed I was feeling so bad I was actually happy they found something wrong with me. I had an excuse, a thing I could fight back against. My wife has D as well, she has not had any complications so her sense of urgency to get things under control are far more relaxed than mine. I had a collection of symptoms of D from a MRSA infection, ear aches, neuropathy, and open heart surgery, so my attitude is bit more strict than that of my wife's.



Not throwing in the white flag. Fighting is what I'm doing and planning to do as long as I can. The reference to the clients wasn't just that they didn't take care of themselves there are also those that did and the medications eventually took a toll on them.

I know that life is full of surprises and that any day can be your last. This is very new to me and its starring me in the face. I'm sure that others at one given point whether they have diabetes or other diseases have thought about what I've said time and time again.

I just have a wave of emotions and I didn't mean to come off as "weak" or "throwing up the white flag". I intend to fight and do what I need to do. I just need to believe there is something more. Thanks for your response. :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well, I remember reading it and sharing it with my husband because it was the first time I felt the heaviness of all this. I cannot recall the name of the person who posted it but I believe the title was called A stupid deadly mistake or something to that effect. It closed out by saying that diabetes was to be eventually related to our last breath in life. It was just something that I hadn't thought of since the diagnoses. I just figured if I did things right I wouldn't have to worry about anything else.

I'm glad for you that is has been so positive. Maybe someday soon I will feel the same. My lifestyle though was pretty normal. I was not a carboholic or chocoholic. I ate decently was active for my kids. Just living life.

I just need to know what the success stories are. Is there managing without medication? Is it possible for D to go away? If I do have to stay on medications is it possible they will eventually hurt me?

I am grateful for this forum and the advice/support I have been given. Thank you for your response. :eek:

I know nothing of a blog saying such things about diabetes, but I can say with absolute assurance that diabetes is the best thing that could have happened to me. If not for this diagnosis, I would still be cruising along eating everything that was bad for me. I was never a junk food person, but I was a huge carboholic. And I would have continued down that path until my feet fell off, my kidneys failed and blindness took my eyes.

Now I have no intention of losing any of those things. I control my diabetes and I fully expect to get hit by a bus before I ever die of diabetes. They can put whatever they damn well please on my death certificate, but diabetes won't get me.

This is not a death sentence. It is a challenge - of course - but it is not a death sentence or even a guarantee of complications.

We have many things to overcome, not the least of which is the ADA and their warped ideas. But we can spread the real word as much as possible of how to manage successfully, and live long healthy lives in spite of diabetes.

Control is the key.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Not at all, sometimes you need to hear things boldly for that extra push. For that I thank you.

I am sorry for all that your going through. That is what I am afraid of. Doing all that I can to the T and still receiving a collections of symptoms because of D. Whether or not I follow the rules to the T there's no guarantee for the quality of life I'm going to have. I guess I'm looking for a stamp of approval :). Time will tell and for now I will fight for my days. Thank you again. Best of luck to you and your wife. You'll be in my prayers.

Its a fight worth fighting for. You have a good attitude and I am sorry if I came across to boldly.

You see when I was Dxed I was feeling so bad I was actually happy they found something wrong with me. I had an excuse, a thing I could fight back against. My wife has D as well, she has not had any complications so her sense of urgency to get things under control are far more relaxed than mine. I had a collection of symptoms of D from a MRSA infection, ear aches, neuropathy, and open heart surgery, so my attitude is bit more strict than that of my wife's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Can I return the gift? Lol All joking aside, I know your right. It just seems overwhelming right now. Time heals all wounds maybe? Thank you Patdart. :eek:

reverie, it simply is not your fault. It's a gift of our genes. You see the results of bad self care, not good control. Even if some of them did try to eat as they were told, and took the meds properly, if they followed the ADA diet, this could well be the result. Today, we know better and you'll do just fine if you fight the battle and low carb and do a lot of testing until you know your body and eat to your meter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,055 Posts
Reverie, I think all of us here can say that we have had that same little black cloud hanging over our heads and in our thoughts constantly once dx'd with D. Diabetes can be managed, and can be managed without meds at some point if meds are in the picture now. I have read some Type 2's who were on insulin and were able to eliminate it once getting control of their diabetes. Diabetes is a disease; but with that said, it is a manageable disease. You do not have to have complications from it unless you choose to ignore it. I've ignored it in the past and did have some complications such as neuropathy and visions difficulties, but since getting back in the game and watching carbs and taking my meds, my vision is much better and the neuropathy is all but gone. I suffered from a systemic yeast infection for 1-1/2 years because of diabetes, but I've got that controlled now as well and suffer no more with it. Sometimes I feel like diabetes and death are always on my mind, but I think to some degree that is typical. I have up days and I have down days. But, I will never give up on taking care of myself. Being a Type 2 diabetic is not always caused by eating badly or not taking care of yourself. Some people are just pre-disposed to it and eventually fall victim to it. I have two sisters who have no problems with diabetes, but yet my Mom was a Type 2 and I am a Type 2. Why did I get it? Who knows. Perhaps I'm just more predisposed than my sisters to my Mom's genes. Just luck of the draw I guess. But, I have had the self pity parties for myself and then realize that nobody can make things better for me other than myself. So I take my meds and I watch what I eat and I exercise.
Now, to address the meds issue. First off, yes all meds can affect your liver. And yes that is why they do blood work often to make sure your liver enzymes are normal. This is a great way to keep your liver healthy because if anything is detected it can be stopped immediately. Your liver is actually one organ that can regenerate itself when damaged. As far as those diabetics who have died or are dying of end-stage renal failure; that has to do with the Kidney's...not the liver. typically this is caused by uncontrolled blood sugar over a substantial amount of time. If you do not control your blood sugar, then yes it is a serious complication from diabetes. My Mom passed away from end-stage renal failure, but she also had congestive heart failure and took many many medications. If you can keep the medications to a minimum, then that is less of what can affect your organs. I currently take Metformin, and metformin works in the liver (not the kidney's) to help lessen the amount of glucose that the liver either produces or releases. I also take long acting and fast acting insulin. Because my pancreas is compromised and not working properly, I need this insulin to help control my blood sugar. Even the doctor told me it doesn't mean I will need insulin for the rest of my life. There is the possibility of eliminating the need for it in the future. But that is up to me and how much I want to be proactive in keeping my blood sugar under control.
Diabetics do not have the advantage of being able to eat whatever they want. However, those individuals who can eat whatever they want are not always making healthy choices either. At least as a diabetic and educating yourself about all of it we can make the healthy choices and still enjoy eating! Our lives do not have to be shortened because we are diabetic. And if it is the diabetes that eventually causes our demise, well as I always say, no body can say I didn't give it the great fight! I did not just give up and say whatever. I took the best possible road I could take and followed what my body told me to do.
It's okay to pity yourself once in a while; just don't let it get in your way of enjoying your life, whatever timeline you may have. Take care of yourself, take care of your family, enjoy your kids, and know that you are making the best possible choices for yourself and for them. *Hugs* I know exactly how you feel, but it will be okay. There are many people here who are young, middle-aged, elderly...all with Type 2. I don't believe any of them have lost their vision, their limbs, fingers or toes, or anything else. Some do have some difficulties, but I think by living with a positive attitude is the best way to enjoy what life has to offer, and to deal with all the bad that is out there. Keep in mind, their are people suffering way worse things than being diabetic. Pray for them, and for ourselves. God does listen to us. Keep your chin up and do not let this get you down. Shake yourself off and get back to living!
 
  • Like
Reactions: muck and reverie08

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,368 Posts
Welcome to DF. You will find a lot of support here and tons of success stories. I have to say I was fairly healthy before diabetes, very athletic and ate what I thought was a healthy vegetarian diet. I was shocked when I was first was dx'd because I didn't understand how someone who never ate sugar could get diabetes. But almost 5 years later, I am even healthier and although not overweight at dx, I am now quite thin and look fantastic. I learned because of the way my pancreas doesn't work, I need to limit certain foods, especially carbs. But I have a fantastic diet. With the help of online friends I have learned how to bake cookies, muffins, cheesecakes, fudge and all sorts of yummy things that don't raise my bg and actually lower it sometimes. I rarely spike my bg over 120 and it is usually much lower. I would guess because I test alot my bgs now are better than a lot of non D's. Yes I do have to take Metformin but have no side effects and it works great. I don't have to have a lot of lab tests to look for damage. I am very lucky that they caught my diabetes before it could damage blood vessels.
 
  • Like
Reactions: reverie08

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thank you Naynay. Everything you said what exactly what I needed to hear. I know there are worse things out there and that things can always be worse. This is just new and scary for me. Today was just a down day. I may have more in the future but I will try my best to make certain they don't outdo the great ones. You are very kind and I am grateful for your wealth of information. :eek:

Reverie, I think all of us here can say that we have had that same little black cloud hanging over our heads and in our thoughts constantly once dx'd with D. Diabetes can be managed, and can be managed without meds at some point if meds are in the picture now. I have read some Type 2's who were on insulin and were able to eliminate it once getting control of their diabetes. Diabetes is a disease; but with that said, it is a manageable disease. You do not have to have complications from it unless you choose to ignore it. I've ignored it in the past and did have some complications such as neuropathy and visions difficulties, but since getting back in the game and watching carbs and taking my meds, my vision is much better and the neuropathy is all but gone. I suffered from a systemic yeast infection for 1-1/2 years because of diabetes, but I've got that controlled now as well and suffer no more with it. Sometimes I feel like diabetes and death are always on my mind, but I think to some degree that is typical. I have up days and I have down days. But, I will never give up on taking care of myself. Being a Type 2 diabetic is not always caused by eating badly or not taking care of yourself. Some people are just pre-disposed to it and eventually fall victim to it. I have two sisters who have no problems with diabetes, but yet my Mom was a Type 2 and I am a Type 2. Why did I get it? Who knows. Perhaps I'm just more predisposed than my sisters to my Mom's genes. Just luck of the draw I guess. But, I have had the self pity parties for myself and then realize that nobody can make things better for me other than myself. So I take my meds and I watch what I eat and I exercise.
Now, to address the meds issue. First off, yes all meds can affect your liver. And yes that is why they do blood work often to make sure your liver enzymes are normal. This is a great way to keep your liver healthy because if anything is detected it can be stopped immediately. Your liver is actually one organ that can regenerate itself when damaged. As far as those diabetics who have died or are dying of end-stage renal failure; that has to do with the Kidney's...not the liver. typically this is caused by uncontrolled blood sugar over a substantial amount of time. If you do not control your blood sugar, then yes it is a serious complication from diabetes. My Mom passed away from end-stage renal failure, but she also had congestive heart failure and took many many medications. If you can keep the medications to a minimum, then that is less of what can affect your organs. I currently take Metformin, and metformin works in the liver (not the kidney's) to help lessen the amount of glucose that the liver either produces or releases. I also take long acting and fast acting insulin. Because my pancreas is compromised and not working properly, I need this insulin to help control my blood sugar. Even the doctor told me it doesn't mean I will need insulin for the rest of my life. There is the possibility of eliminating the need for it in the future. But that is up to me and how much I want to be proactive in keeping my blood sugar under control.
Diabetics do not have the advantage of being able to eat whatever they want. However, those individuals who can eat whatever they want are not always making healthy choices either. At least as a diabetic and educating yourself about all of it we can make the healthy choices and still enjoy eating! Our lives do not have to be shortened because we are diabetic. And if it is the diabetes that eventually causes our demise, well as I always say, no body can say I didn't give it the great fight! I did not just give up and say whatever. I took the best possible road I could take and followed what my body told me to do.
It's okay to pity yourself once in a while; just don't let it get in your way of enjoying your life, whatever timeline you may have. Take care of yourself, take care of your family, enjoy your kids, and know that you are making the best possible choices for yourself and for them. *Hugs* I know exactly how you feel, but it will be okay. There are many people here who are young, middle-aged, elderly...all with Type 2. I don't believe any of them have lost their vision, their limbs, fingers or toes, or anything else. Some do have some difficulties, but I think by living with a positive attitude is the best way to enjoy what life has to offer, and to deal with all the bad that is out there. Keep in mind, their are people suffering way worse things than being diabetic. Pray for them, and for ourselves. God does listen to us. Keep your chin up and do not let this get you down. Shake yourself off and get back to living!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thank you jwags. It great to hear you're doing so well. I am on Glumetza (extension of Metformin) which does have a lot of side effects as did the Met when I was on it. It's been 3 weeks. I hope my body adjusts soon. You are an inspiration and I hope to be where you are one day. :eek:

Welcome to DF. You will find a lot of support here and tons of success stories. I have to say I was fairly healthy before diabetes, very athletic and ate what I thought was a healthy vegetarian diet. I was shocked when I was first was dx'd because I didn't understand how someone who never ate sugar could get diabetes. But almost 5 years later, I am even healthier and although not overweight at dx, I am now quite thin and look fantastic. I learned because of the way my pancreas doesn't work, I need to limit certain foods, especially carbs. But I have a fantastic diet. With the help of online friends I have learned how to bake cookies, muffins, cheesecakes, fudge and all sorts of yummy things that don't raise my bg and actually lower it sometimes. I rarely spike my bg over 120 and it is usually much lower. I would guess because I test alot my bgs now are better than a lot of non D's. Yes I do have to take Metformin but have no side effects and it works great. I don't have to have a lot of lab tests to look for damage. I am very lucky that they caught my diabetes before it could damage blood vessels.
 

·
WHAT, I got D
Joined
·
3,849 Posts
The positive motivation I was trying to give you is I went thru all of that before I was Dxed with D or right after Dxed. I am no longer on any medication other than Lisinopril of my own choosing. My A1C is less than 5, my BG seldom goes over 100 at any given time. I walk 2-4 miles a day and enjoy everything that I want to do right now. I was also Dxed with NAFLD but that too has went away, no Kidney problems or any other problems to speak of. I intend to stay this way for a long time.



Not at all, sometimes you need to hear things boldly for that extra push. For that I thank you.

I am sorry for all that your going through. That is what I am afraid of. Doing all that I can to the T and still receiving a collections of symptoms because of D. Whether or not I follow the rules to the T there's no guarantee for the quality of life I'm going to have. I guess I'm looking for a stamp of approval :). Time will tell and for now I will fight for my days. Thank you again. Best of luck to you and your wife. You'll be in my prayers.
 
  • Like
Reactions: tony0611

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,444 Posts
Signature

Control is with Diet modification, exercise, supps.
A1C, Dxed 11, 5.6, 4.8, 4.6
MCS... wow on those A1Cs.. how long did you take to get to these ?
 

·
WHAT, I got D
Joined
·
3,849 Posts
Dxed a little over 2.5 yrs ago.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top