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Hello my friends. I am a 20-year-old girl with a father who has type 1 diabetes. my gynecologist -for another reason- told me to take a blood exam (it turned out I had the polycystic ovary syndrome) and saw that my fasting blood sugar (after 8h of fasting) was 95 mg. today -while I was eating- I told my mother to test my blood sugar. I turned out i had 92. is there any chance I am at a high risk? or is it normal for my blood sugar to be at these levels?
 

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Welcome to the Forum! :welcome:

Your numbers sound very good, indeed. Looks like you're in the normal range! To get a better idea of your post-meal numbers, you may want to try testing at 1 hour after first bite, then 1 hour after that (times are approximate). This is because various foods take longer to produce glucose than others.

According to WebMD (Blood Glucose, page 2):

If you had a fasting blood glucose test, a level between 70 and100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is considered normal.

If you had a random blood glucose test, normal results depend on when you last ate. Most of the time, blood glucose levels will be below 125 mg/dL.
The full article goes into blood glucose levels and testing in greater depth.

Good on ya for testing! It's the wise thing to do if you have any concerns at all about blood glucose.
 
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thank you for your reply. my gynecologist (three years ago, when my blood sugar was 95 after 8h fasting) told me to be cautious, because apparently I have a genetic predisposition for diabetes due to my father's illness. I do not know if this is really true, since my blood sugar is obviously within a normal range.

since then, I've been trying to regulate my carbs and eat more healthily, but I slip into my old habits occasionally. I am very scared sometimes.
 

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I believe with PCOS it is possible to be at higher risk for diabetes, from the small amount I've read, due to insulin resistance, and I think also possible with a T1 for a father. But no hard science on the latter I believe.
Also more likely to develop D if fasting is higher than 92.
Doesn't mean you have it!
The very little I know on PCOS I think I read in Dr. Bernsteins book, the diabetes solution, where he mentions it and uses low carb diets and I think metformin for his patients. Take a look at that book if you can.
For further testing I would think that testing for IR (insulin resistance) might be helpful?
So you could take an oral glucose tolerance test and test insulin levels and c-peptide: 1. at fasting, 2. at 1h and 2 h after the test. If I remember right, from reading Atkin's Book on Diabetes, an insulin level at 1 h (or 2h? can't remember) which is 5 times higher than your fasting level indicates insulin resistance.

For insulin resistance you can then cut back on carbs and increase your activity level throughout the day.

Going ahead and testing right now 1 and 2h after meals is a great idea too. If you see high numbers thenits time to cut back on carbs.

Let us know what you find out!
 
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Oh and try not to be scared! Even if you get it it is possible to have a great life. Again look at Dr. Bernsteins book if you can.
Maybe its on Kindle so that you can download it on your computer etc..?
You have the advantage at least of the fresh olive oil in greece, fresh vegetables, good fish and meats. I know resist those treats and breads when you can! Eat nuts, olives and cheese (ah I miss good olives, just harder to find the good ones here, I'm totally spoiled).
Hugs to you!

I miss Greece.
I'll be back visiting my family next summer!
Enjoy your summer, eat healthy when you can, enjoy your treats when you have them, eat some baklava for me.

Hope your post meal sugars are great right now.
 

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thank you for your reply. my gynecologist (three years ago, when my blood sugar was 95 after 8h fasting) told me to be cautious, because apparently I have a genetic predisposition for diabetes due to my father's illness. I do not know if this is really true, since my blood sugar is obviously within a normal range.

since then, I've been trying to regulate my carbs and eat more healthily, but I slip into my old habits occasionally. I am very scared sometimes.
Hi - it's great to meet you. Your numbers really do look great. As far as your doctor's comments, in my opinion, any of us that have parents with diabetes are at a risk, so we need to be cautious. In my opinion, because your numbers are very typical, I would therefore just be aware of what you're eating and try to maintain a healthy, low carb way of eating. I would also be sure to maintain annual blood sugar checks or even semi-annual blood sugar checks when you go for your regular doctor visits. I commend you for being proactive due to your genetic factors.
 

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So you could take an oral glucose tolerance test and test insulin levels and c-peptide: 1. at fasting, 2. at 1h and 2 h after the test. If I remember right, from reading Atkin's Book on Diabetes, an insulin level at 1 h (or 2h? can't remember) which is 5 times higher than your fasting level indicates insulin resistance.
I'm thinking five times higher isn't quite what it was? ;)
 

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Mary0110 said:
I'm thinking five times higher isn't quite what it was? ;)
A fifth of a normal OGTT wouldn't be fun either. I'm guessing.
 

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I would buy a drugstore meter and test every few months, maybe at different times of day, before and one or 2 hr after eating ...

If that sounds pernickety and neurotic, consider the shock and anguish of a 447 Blood sugar, and being wheeled to the hospital from the doc's office, totally unexpected ... you do not want that.

Keep an eye on your diet (yes it matters, in T1 as well as 2), and make sure you ASK your internist or GP for an A1c annually. Oh, AND a GAD-65 antibody test, every few years ... and a VITAMIN D.

These are not extreme measures, no matter what they tell you ... a friend in her mid-20's just came up Vit D deficient, and her mom has T2D.
 

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There may be a little confusion here, T1 comes from an acute pancreatic infection or an autoimmune attack on one's pancreas. That one had a perfect 84 mg/dL a month ago has no bearing on whether your pancreas is attack or not.

T2 is usually a continuation of Metabolic Syndrome or drug induced like using steroids against infection, or anesthesia ( although anesthesia induced diabetes is often called T1 because it is so sudden ).
 

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I have pcos and my father was type 2 (passed away at 52). You are lucky that you are so aware at ur age. Due to pcod anf genetic history, i got gestational diabetes when i was 6 months pregnant and since then my fasting went up from 90s to 110s. i have to eat low carb to be back in 90s. my doctor told me that pcos puts me at 75% more risk than others to develop diabetes and heart disease, incorporate exercise in ur life and make it as essential as brushing ur teeth. cut down on junk and eat healthy home cooked food which is not crazily high in carbs. dont worry or panic. its just making these small alterations in lifestyle because u know u are pre disposed. I know its too soon to tell you this- but when u get married and plan babies, be a little careful in ur pregnancy. Avoiding gestational diabetes (you are prone due to pcos and heriditary) will be really helpful! Godd luck!! And dont forget to enjoy life :)
 

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There may be a little confusion here, T1 comes from an acute pancreatic infection or an autoimmune attack on one's pancreas. That one had a perfect 84 mg/dL a month ago has no bearing on whether your pancreas is attack or not.

T2 is usually a continuation of Metabolic Syndrome or drug induced like using steroids against infection, or anesthesia ( although anesthesia induced diabetes is often called T1 because it is so sudden ).
PCOS is more frequent in T2 AND T1, however, Jim. The slow underlying beta cell destruction of LADA-type diabetes could indeed underlie PCOS.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
thank you all for your replies :)

It has been decided that I will soon take another blood exam to check on my PCOS and hormones, and maybe discuss a little with my doctor. DonnaB thank you for your encouraging words-truth is, I eat a lot of meat, it is like a very traditional thing in Greece-meat on Easter day, meat on Christmas day, meat as a fast-food treat, e.t.c. but i love oil and Greek salad, so I kinda maintain a balance. but in general, I do not pay attention to my diet; i love chocolate, ice cream, fast food, all this stuff I should avoid. I did some pilates and aerobic exercises during the year but it's no good if I consume too many carbs afterwards. I guess I'll try to regulate my carbs from now on.
 

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It would be really good to slowly phase out as many carbs as you can

Sugars breads rice potatoes. Eat as little as possible. Eat plenty of meat and vegetables and olive oil. Make sure you don't eat vegetable oils ( Fitika)
 
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