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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Everyone.... Just found out yesterday that I have type 2. It's been a whirlwind 24 hours, I'm exhausted mentally. Think I'm on information overload. Doctor sent me away with very little, no candy, no sugar etc. Waiting on a referral for a dietician and she want to put me on either Metforman or Ozempic. Leaning toward Ozempic, heard Meforman is hard on the stomach and I already have issues with that. So much information, I just don't know where to start. One minute I'm okay, next I'm bursting into tears. I'm lucking to have one of my best friends who is diabetic. She was wonderful last night. Just so confused and don't know where to go from here. What can I eat, what can't I eat, which is the better medication, etc. Sorry, just feeling a little lost and overwhelmed.
 

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Hello, shopaulatnt! (Interesting username; I'd love to hear where you got it.)

Yeah, getting the official word is disheartening, scary, and overwhelming. We've all been there. I hope we here can make that easier for you because we've had that experience.

You'll do better when you're armed with information. We recommend a Web site called Blood Sugar 101 . We're not affiliated with it; it's just been really good at explaining diabetes and the relationship between food and exercise and medications and mindset.

One of the things Blood Sugar 101 will show you is that what you eat makes a difference. You can think of diabetes as a kind of food allergy. If you were allergic to nuts, you probably wouldn't keep eating them and using EpiPens to counteract the effects. In the same way, if diabetes affects our ability to regulate glucose levels in our body, does it make sense to eat "normal" amounts of sugar and carbohydrates and have to take medication (Metformin, Ozempic, and others) to counteract that? We're not doctors here and we're not advocating not taking medication. But all medicine has side effects. If you can improve your health without them, then maybe carefully watching what you eat is a worthwhile approach. That's an approach many of us here have taken to either avoid or minimize the amount of medication we need to keep healthy.

Please take a look at Blood Sugar 101 and then come back with questions you may have. You will get through this. We have and we know it's possible to have a good life free of many of the worst side effects of diabetes. We're here to help.
 

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Welcome, shopaulatnt to the club no one wants to join! You have come to a great place though--full of encouragement, knowledge, and support.
I wish there was a "care" emoji on this forum like there is on Facebook.
I remember those first scary days (11 years ago). My mother was diabetic, but no help as she didn't fully understand it all. I found this forum about 3 months after I was diagnosed.
My doctor started me out on Janumet, but due to insurance requirements I'm now taking Metformin ER. The Extended Release is easier on the stomach. Metformin does take a while for your body to get used to. I've never taken Ozempic, but I've heard that it is in short supply due to the current wave of people wanting it for the weight loss side effects.
I hope you stick around and find what you need here.
 

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Hi shopaulatnt, welcome to the forum.

When I was pretty sure I was diabetic, I got in that whirlwind too. I started researching and trying everything I could find. Food seemed to be the key thing so I tried the ADA (American Diabetes Association) recommended diet, low glycemic index diet, vegan diet, vegetarian diet, and pescatarian diet. All were supposed to be good for diabetics but none of these worked to lower my blood glucose. I then found this forum and learned about the low carb high fat diet that I thought was absolutely crazy, but they swore by it. I hesitantly started it but guess what, I noticed my BG numbers showed to start getting lower. I was testing my BG a lot and noticed that my after meal numbers weren't going as high as they were, and slowly my fasting BG and A1c numbers finally started to drop. Not only that I also lost about 50 pounds over about a six month period. I've been doing low carb / keto for 10 years now. It has worked very well for me and has easily been sustainable.

I was originally started on Januvia and then changed to Janumet to see if it would do better. After reading about diabetes meds and potential side effects, I asked my doctor to change me to metformin. It was the regular version and I did have the common digestive issues it is infamous for. Those subsided after a month or two and have beed good ever since. I did quit once for a while because diet and exercise was controlling my BG but I decided to start it back because of other good things I read that it did. Like etherea said, the extended release is more user friendly.

As newly diagnosed, I would recommend trying diet first. Carb reduction is the key thing, carbs are turned into glucose in the body and is the biggest source of that glucose. Carbs are more than just sugar and candy and desserts and other sweet stuff. Starchy foods, like breads, potatoes, and pastas are also converted to glucose. Start cutting way back on those things and you should see you BG numbers drop. Testing is also key, if you don't have a BG monitor you need to get one. There is a good testing protocol in Bloodsgar 101 that itissteve recommended. If diet alone doesn't get you where you want to be, then add some exercise if not already doing or add a little more intensity if not doing enough.

Don't be afraid to ask any and all questions you may have, we were all where you are now starting out at one time. Don't get disappointed if things happen slowly, the race we are in is a marathon and not a sprint.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Everyone... so much information to digest. I ended up taking a day off work yesterday just to process. My boss is also type 2, so he totally understood. Also told me if I had any questions, he would be more than happy to help. I have been cutting out all sugar, switched to a sweetener. I was on a low carb diet before, so I remember the basics, just have to refresh all that. I'm amazed on how much sugar is in everything!!! Trip to the grocery store took forever!! Also went whole grain on everything and the prices... wow... this is going to take some adjusting. Trying to stick to the basics until I see the dietician, whenever that might be..... I did order a couple of cookbooks from amazon, so hopefully that will help. Still have to talk to my doctor about Medication. Still seems surreal.

Think I'm also going through sugar withdrawal... trying to eat fruit and veggies when I'm feeling a little week. Made some muffins I found on the Diabetes website, they aren't bad. Just going to have to do better meal planning instead of grab and go which is what we have been doing the last few years. Air fryer will be a permeant fixture on my counter.

Is there any easier way to relieve the symptoms of sugar withdraw? Drinking lots of water, avoiding junk food of any kind. Sat and watch my husband eat a bowl of ice cream last night and wanted to kill him. Was seriously thinking of knocking him in the head with a bowl then licking his spoon... this is nasty.
 

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Is there any easier way to relieve the symptoms of sugar withdraw? Drinking lots of water, avoiding junk food of any kind. Sat and watch my husband eat a bowl of ice cream last night and wanted to kill him. Was seriously thinking of knocking him in the head with a bowl then licking his spoon... this is nasty.
Sugar (carbs, for that matter) can enable a strong addiction. But this will pass. What you're experiencing now may be two things:
  • lower blood sugar than you've had because you've cut out so much sugar; this mimics the "gotta eat" feeling people get when their blood sugar drops to very low levels (but if you test you'll find you're likely at 100 [5.6 mmol/L] or higher).
  • knocking out carbohydrate calories without replacing them can leave you feeling hungry. Most low-carb eating plans bump up the fat intake to compensate. You might want to consider buttering your vegetables a little more or eating higher-fat snacks like cheese or nuts (in moderation) when you feel you need a snack.
 

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Sat and watch my husband eat a bowl of ice cream last night and wanted to kill him. Was seriously thinking of knocking him in the head with a bowl then licking his spoon..
I'm grateful that I'm not an ice cream fan! However, we have to lock our cat in another room when husband eats ice cream! It's the only "people food" I've ever seen her be interested in much less fight for. He's lucky that she doesn't have opposable thumbs :D
 
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