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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
Any idea on roughly how much sugar can the liver can produce from protein, and how quick that process is?

I ask since my breakfast shake is nominally 1g net carbs (8g total 7g of fiber), and 30g protein. Somehow, this spikes me much more than I’d care to see (normally consumed as creamer w/ 2 cups of coffee).

I assume it’s the protein content doing it, and I’ll be getting the 15g protein version of the shake in the future. Just surprising that with 1g of net carbs and 40 mins on the exercise bike (200 cal active energy burned by my Apple Watch) my BG went from 157 this AM to 179 two hours after.

TLDR: I really hate my body sometimes.
 

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I've read that some Type 1's calculate for about 1/2 the protein when determining how much bolus insulin they take. Some where I read that about 50%of the amino acids, that protein breaks down to can be converted to glucose. I think "can" is the key word. Just because they can, doesn't necessarily mean they do.

These are just my thoughts and I may be totally wrong. I think the main driver in that would be is there a need for the glucose? I would think the body functions to ensure that there is enough glucose in circulation and in storage to ensure that the 5% or so of cells we have that can only use glucose as a fuel will have that fuel available. If there is not a need, then those excess aminos are converted to something else or end up going out as waste. Even if converted to glucose for use or storage it takes hours for the process to take place.

I'm not sure how to explain why after some strenuous exercise that BG will go up, but I know it happens at times. i've gone on 30-40 mile bike rides before and be blown away that my BG was higher when I got back than it was before I left, sometimes even when not eating before riding. I'm guessing as I depleted the stored glucose in my muscles, my liver said I see you need a little more fuel, so here ya go and it dumps some into circulation. I've seen it more often though when I tend to get a little too hot on the ride. I've been on 3 rides of 100 miles, it has never been high at the end of a century ride, more like low 60s upper 50s.
 
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I'm not sure how to explain why after some strenuous exercise that BG will go up, but I know it happens at times.
I've also read that body hydration levels are implicated in that. And those are instances when you're likely a little dehydrated along with whatever effects there are on body tissue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
BG going up and down and all around is part of the game isn't it?
Certainly seems like it. I measured 124 before bed last night, and somehow got up to 170 this morning. Seriously, what the heck.
 

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Most likely
Certainly seems like it. I measured 124 before bed last night, and somehow got up to 170 this morning. Seriously, what the heck.
Most likely dawn phenomenon. Most everybody usually gets a little burst of hormones prior to waking up to give them some quick energy. They cause blood sugar to go up. Most people usually have a response of some insulin secretion to offset the rise in BG. Type 1 diabetics don't have an insulin response, Type 2s most likely do have a response, but there may be an insufficient amount if their beta cells aren't producing enough or the sufficient amount is not enough due to insulin resistance.
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