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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi All,

I finally recieved my three month lab results today after getting serious again in May. I would like some advice on how to improve. I'm very happy about being in the 5% club...It has been years! I notice I have 5mg/dl of Ketones. Is that a good number to be at for Keto? What is the chance of my doctor questioning and disapproving? I have a new dr as my last dr moved away. Thanks.
 

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Looks like you are going in the right direction. HDL came up and Triglycerides went down, lowering your HDL/Trig ratio from 3.3 to 1.4. You want it to be less than 2.0, at that level, risks for heart attack and stroke are reduced.

Greater than 0.5 is considered to be in ketosis. Brush up on the difference between NK (nutritional ketosis) and DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis) before your doctor's appointment, they get confused sometimes and you can either correct them or just smile and nod your head while they talk, knowing you are OK.

Oh, and welcome back to the 5% club.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Looks like you are going in the right direction. HDL came up and Triglycerides went down, lowering your HDL/Trig ratio from 3.3 to 1.4. You want it to be less than 2.0, at that level, risks for heart attack and stroke are reduced.

Greater than 0.5 is considered to be in ketosis. Brush up on the difference between NK (nutritional ketosis) and DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis) before your doctor's appointment, they get confused sometimes and you can either correct them or just smile and nod your head while they talk, knowing you are OK.

Oh, and welcome back to the 5% club.
Thanks Mbuster! Most of my fats for the last 3 months have been from cheese, heavy cream and eggs. Cheese is my go to when I am hungry between meals. What is the best way to increase my HDL to value over 60? Should I increase my intake of Olive oil, Coconut oil and fish oil?
 

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Extra virgin olive oil, fatty fish (i.e. salmon, sardines), nuts (macadamias, walnuts, pistachios, almonds), and avocados for a few food things. Maybe even a little dry red wine can help raise HDL, if drank in moderation.

As VeeJay says, exercise helps. Working out with weights, especially the lower body.

There are some meds that raise HDL, but I saw something recently that hinted doing it that way may not have the same heart protective benefits.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Extra virgin olive oil, fatty fish (i.e. salmon, sardines), nuts (macadamias, walnuts, pistachios, almonds), and avocados for a few food things. Maybe even a little dry red wine can help raise HDL, if drank in moderation.

As VeeJay says, exercise helps. Working out with weights, especially the lower body.

There are some meds that raise HDL, but I saw something recently that hinted doing it that way may not have the same heart protective benefits.
Thanks Mbuster and Veejay. I am doing the exercise part consisting of weight training and walking. How high should my LDL be? In May, it was 84 and this week, it was 110. According to the lab report, it should be under 100.
My goal for my next lipid panel in November would be to get my HDL over 60. Cheese is my go to when I am hungry as it is so convenient to eat. I was thinking to raise my HDL, I should incorporate more HDL foods such as you suggested. Avocados and olive oil to replace some of the cheese.
 

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I think it would be a healthier option if the insurance companies would be more interested in doing advanced lipid testing, where they actually measure LDL, do particle sizes, and test for inflammatory properties. My insurance carrier, BCBS, has deemed this as experimental and will not cover it but they pay for something that just calculates LDL and in reality is meaningless. That just tells me they are not really interested in my health, that they are bought and paid for by big pharma.

I was lucky for a couple of years, in that the labs my doctor used would accept what ever the insurance covered and write off the rest of the expenses. I guess it was a failed attempt to make a more expensive and expansive test acceptable.

That is what I did, I added EVOO, Flax Seed Oil, more fish and avocados and cut back on the cheeses. When my cardiologist asks if I had a copy of his suggested diet, I tell him yes and I eat low carb Mediterranean. My salad dressing is 1-2 TBSP ACV, 2 TBSP EVOO, and 2 TBSP Flax seed oil. I turn up the bowl and slurp the last little bit after eating all the salad.
 

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i see my cardiologist next week as he is relatively new. Ill show him my lipid profile which is HDL 70 LDL 45 and total 140 and triglycerides 65, ratio 2.0.
If i ask him to order LDL particle size and test for inflammatory properties and he says not necessary or your fine or i dont order those then i know he is a product of a bygone era who has not progressed
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I just received a call from the nurse. My new doctor wants to prescribe Atorvastatin because my LDL is 115 instead of under 99 just because of the fact that I am diabetic. I told her no and that I want to discuss this with my doctor. In looking back at my cholesterol records from my pre-diabetic days from 2007, I would say that I am not doing that bad without it statins and the side effects.

2007:
Total Cholesterol = 268
HDL = 41
CHL/HDL ratio = 6.5
Trigs =319
LDL Direct = 168
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I want to relay what my Dr responded to my refusal to start statins. The Dr called to discuss my reluctance to start the statin. He felt obliged to discuss the science of statins with me and my particular demographic...type 2 over 50, white, etc.."Your DX puts you at greater risk of a cardiovascular event and statins would help reduce your odds" He told me it was my decision and he would respect it. I told him what I believe puts me at more risk is high blood sugar. I would tend to think that most diabetics in the study had much higher blood sugar or even out of control blood sugar and that was the reason for the greater risk. I told him that if I can not keep my blood sugar as close to normal then nothing else matters. He said" Then we have a plan. We will concentrate on keeping your blood sugar low for now." I said, thank you and we hung up. He called back like 4 minutes later and wanted to add this. He said, I wanted to let you know your risk of a cardiac event is "8 people of 100 will have a cardiac event without statins. On statins, the risk is reduced to 6 people out of 100. I said "thanks, The risk of side effects is not worth the 1-2% decrease in odds of a cardiac event and may correlate to no decrease at all depending on how your study was conducted. He basically agreed saying the risk reward was low.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
What is the 5% club?
It's when your HbA1c is between 5.0% and 5.9%.:smile2: My three month average A1C came back at 5.8% which is good but considered pre-diabetic. My new goal is to get it under 5.6% which would indicate normal range.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
It's when your HbA1c is between 5.0% and 5.9%.:smile2: My three month average A1C came back at 5.8% which is good but considered pre-diabetic. My new goal is to get it under 5.6% which would indicate normal range.
To put this in perspective, my wife's HbA1C came back at 5.5% or a daily average of 115 on the meter. The average for me at 5.8% is 129. Her blood sugar has been increasing over the last few years so I make her test after what I consider high carb meals. I have seen it get to 155-165 an hour after a meal a few times which never happened a few years ago so I test her and urge her to reduce her carbs.
 
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