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Hey, I was thinking of getting this surgery done?? just thought I would ask as a precautionary measure if any of the diabetics on this forum or any friends that you know of that are diabetics (type 1 preferably) who got this surgery done and are experiencing any kind of a problem? (hope not!) Btw I'm a 24 year old type 1 diabetic, having had the condition for more than 9 years now. If you've got any suggestions on this..you're welcome to speak your mind...Cheers guys :)
 

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LASIK is generally safe and requires as little as an hour or two to get done, so I wouldn’t imagine there being a lot of restrictions attached pre-surgery. Still, you should consult with your chosen eye surgeon to be sure. Have you found one? I’d recommend Dr. Alan Carlson if you’re in North Carolina or anywhere near the area. He’s based out of Duke Eye Center and is the top choice given by my own eye doctor, which says much about him I think. :)
 

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Had this done before Dx, it was and still is one of the best things I have ever done. I see perfectly now.
 

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I too had Lasik done about 7 years ago before DX, procedure took about 30 mins, painless & went from extremely bad eyesight to perfect with no after side effects or probs, best money Ive spent
 

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I had the procedure done on both eyes last May. Wow! What a difference it made....no more driving glasses and I no longer need prescription readers. I'd do it again in a heartbeat.

BTW - I've been a member of the T1 club since 2007 and try to maintain my A1C between 5.5 and 5.8. I think a fairly well-contained A1C may make a difference in the success of any medical procedure.

Jen
 

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Well, I suppose *someone* has to rain on the parade here... :(

(disclaimer: I had Lasik in 1997, and I'm a surgical technologist with several years' experience in eye surgery, so please, the below is not the rantings of a lunatic who thinks he knows something because he read a magazine article; I've witnessed this from both sides, so I do know a little bit about it)

Lasik goes wrong about one in a thousand times or something like that...I'm that "one". My left eye came out perfectly, but my right one not only was not improved, it was suddenly astigmatic post-op and has stayed that way ever since the initial procedure fourteen years ago. A couple touch-up procedures over the years did absolutely nothing except hasten my age-related farsightedness and introduce me to the joys of corneal layer separations (aka "map-dot-fingerprint"). I'm presently being fitted for a very special contact lens made specifically for Lasik-gone-bad eyes. <-- READ THAT AGAIN, there is an entire industry emerging to address the ever-growing multitude of Lasik-gone-bad patients. It all has to do with what they're now realizing is a very real long-term potential problem involving post-Lasik corneal thickness. Even if your doc determines that your pre-op corneal thickness is OK (if s/he doesn't check this, don't walk, RUN out of the office immediately, because some people just don't have enough), you may have issues later on. How bad your eyes are now (and if your correction is anything less than -2.0, it is NOT worth the risk) will be the determining factor regarding how much thickness you'll be losing and what that may mean down the road.

From a diabetic perspective, aside from the obvious retinopathy, the only real issues come as you're coming down from high BG levels once you've been diagnosed; the vitreous inside will experience some fluctuations as your body fluids (and your metabolism overall) adjust. But you're not new to the Beast, so I doubt you're going to experience any problems along that front going forward.

You and I are flip-flop opposites here; you've been Type 1 for years and are now looking into Lasik; I'm a long-term Lasik patient who really only joined this extra-fun D club two months ago. So while I can't offer much input regarding the Lasik/Diabetes mix, I can definitely share with you my Lasik experiences and at the very least recommend you seriously ask yourself if you would be OK with your eyesight being worse - MUCH worse - than it is now, because it is a possibility. Anyone who says that there are no risks or that the risks are no biggie is either not informed or just downright dishonest. (I'm not saying that anyone on this forum has said that or anything like it)

I was a -8 and a -8.25 before Lasik, so one could say (and I did) that the potential benefits outweighed the risks. But I didn't get all the benefits and instead got a bunch of nightmare complications...so when people ask if I'd do it again, I actually say "no". While I was sick and tired of contacts and coke-bottle glasses at the time (I was thirty), I'd rather have them right now than these constant issues, not to mention the fears of what I still may have yet to deal with. And while my complications, to me, are major and seriously life-changing, they're nowhere near as bad (two words: corneal transplant) as some others have experienced.

Please think it through; if a hundred people post on here to sing the praises of their Lasik procedure, it's because they have (blessedly) not experienced any complications.

YET.

They may never experience any...you may never experience any...and I hope and pray you don't...but believe you me, if things don't go perfectly as planned, years from now (or even the day after the surgery) you very well may regret having had the procedure.

Research it, ask a million questions, see multiple docs, ask yourself why you want Lasik, etc...and if you do elect to go forward with it, I absolutely wish you the very, very best.
 

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How awful, to have an elective surgery go badly, and with something as important as our eyes. I'm sorry you were on the wrong side of the statistic, but stories like this contribute to my growing concern about elective surgical intervention in general.

From a diabetic perspective, aside from the obvious retinopathy, the only real issues come as you're coming down from high BG levels once you've been diagnosed; the vitreous inside will experience some fluctuations as your body fluids (and your metabolism overall) adjust.
I had very high bs for who knows how long, and had been seeing eye changes the year before dx. I have macular degeneration, but it was different, and moving faster than dry macular does. I kept going to my retinologist who said I had no bleeds, and thought I was just unlucky in how quickly the macular was moving.

I had lots of vision changes before and after dx - but once stabilized also had some sudden issues. The new retinologist did more tests and found I had vitreomacular adhesion in both eyes. One online source called out diabetes as a risk factor.

As we age the vitreous lessens - right? I'm 61 now. So did the adhesions come as a result of vitreous fluctuations from diabetes? How exactly does the vitreous fluctuate - does diabetes affect the quantity of fluid?
 

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but stories like this contribute to my growing concern about elective surgical intervention in general.
I'm with you, Moon. It's kind of why I really didn't sugarcoat it...when I was wheysted's age, I didn't give it a whole lot of thought. Now that I'm older and a lot less vain (not to say that wheysted is vain, I just know that for me it was the fundamental reason for wanting the procedure), I look back on my decision to have Lasik and shake my head.

As we age the vitreous lessens - right? I'm 61 now. So did the adhesions come as a result of vitreous fluctuations from diabetes? How exactly does the vitreous fluctuate - does diabetes affect the quantity of fluid?
As it's been explained to me, the fluctuations in the vitreous associated with the onset of diabetes are essentially just a different manifestation of the typical "fluid management" processes that take place when the body is trying to flush out all the superfluous sugar. The body needs fluids, so in addition to signaling thirst, it also goes to the various cells in the body and robs them of their water. Apparently, the vitreous is not exempt, so it ends up shrinking and becoming a little firmer and stickier. A begets B begets C, so diabetes-inspired theft of fluids contributes to the shrinking of the vitreous, which can cause vitreomacular adhesion. But this usually only occurs at the beginning; once we have bg's under control, the fluid balance ostensibly is OK and the vitreous no longer is asked to give up any water. I was told by my doc that any changes to the vitreous would remedy themselves as my bg's got more consistently normal.

But vitreous shrinkage is also age-related and happens to non-diabetics all the time...so if vitreomacular adhesion or macular holes are occurring at this point, it would seem to be more age-related than diabetes-related...but it might not be possible to know for sure.
 
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Yeah, some years ago I had a palatal surgery (elective, but important to correct a crossbite) where I was told the risks. Well, I lost feeling in my upper gums, they tingle all time. I'm used to it now, but it feels like a wad of cotton between my upper lip and gums. Brushing and flossing feels annoying. The odds of this occuring w/ the surgery? <1% - which sounds fine except when you're on the wrong side of the statistic.

Thanks for the vitreous explanation. It makes sense that my adhesions could be both age and diabetes, and in the end is only a point of curiosity. Since I can't know, I'll blame whatever I'm in the mood to blame at the moment :)
 
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