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This one is baked, as opposed to boiled. It was last year's recipe here. Tasted great. Baked, the meat is redder, and has a different texture.

URL: Corned Beef and Cabbage Recipe | Simply Recipes

I sub'd toasted/ground mustard seed for the honey mustard last year. Dont remember what I did about brown sugar - might have just gone with it.

Anyone have any good LC subs for brown sugar? If not, I'll likely go with a mild herb rub (marjoram, thyme, maybe some ground fennel seed, etc.).
 

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Might try the Ideal no calorie Brown Sugar.
 
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I stopped boiling my corned beef years ago. All I do is rinse it well, place it on a rack in a shallow baking pan and slow roast it (250°F/120°C) in the oven - it's a much better method. I don't use the spice packet or any other seasoning . . . high quality corned beef doesn't need anything and the brand I use is Colorado Premium.
 

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You know me Shanny, I'm always using one of my pressure cookers. Just did a batch (13) hard boiled eggs the other day and the shell just slips off when you peel. Anyway, I also use it for corned beef and I don't completely submerge. The beef is so, so tender and juicy. About an hour to hour and a half depending on size at standard 15 lbs pressure. Costco has good flat cuts. I might give the oven a try though. Something different.
 

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There's no reason that I can see that any meat needs to be drenched in sugar (or fruit, for that matter). So if it were me, I'd not put any sweetening on it, just stick to what you did by using a bit of mustard seed.

But Shanny's method seems worth a try, too.
 

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Ideal brown sugar is something I use also, but very sparingly. First of all, it's xylitol which is extremely toxic to dogs, second of all, it's bulked up with maltodextrin so it will measure out like sugar, and third of all, it's also tweaked with molasses and sucralose. Not exactly the 'ideal' sweetener. A better option is to use powdered erythritol and mash in a coupla drops of your own molasses.
 

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Just did a batch (13) hard boiled eggs the other day and the shell just slips off when you peel.
Does it work with extremely fresh eggs too? Now that we're getting fresh-from-the-nest eggs from our neighbor, I have to age them about four weeks before they're old enough to hard cook. I could speed it up by washing off the 'bloom', but that seems counterintuitive, since that's what keeps bacteria from seeping through the pores of the shell.
 

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I can only say "fresh from the store" works. Six minutes only, once pressure is reached. Cold water cool down to reduce pressure then slowly let cold water run into the side of the pan until eggs are somewhat cooled. One layer of eggs only. I usually have two crack during the process but they are so good to eat hot. I usually let the eggs get to room temp before cooking. And the water should be about half an inch or less up on the eggs (that are already on the rack.). Try it with just six eggs and let me know what happens.
 

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If you can get 'em for free, by all means GO FOR IT! No appreciable difference in flavor, but they're organic and very fresh - the whites are thick/cloudy and stand up in the skillet. The yolks are orange or deep-yellow, showing that the chickens are ranging around getting greens in their diet. We're paying the neighbor boy $2 a dozen, which is somewhat less than the supermarket for ordinary eggs, and especially considering they charge more for organic and/or brown eggs. (and shell color makes no difference whatsoever)
 

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Ideal brown sugar is something I use also, but very sparingly. First of all, it's xylitol which is extremely toxic to dogs, second of all, it's bulked up with maltodextrin so it will measure out like sugar, and third of all, it's also tweaked with molasses and sucralose. Not exactly the 'ideal' sweetener. A better option is to use powdered erythritol and mash in a coupla drops of your own molasses.
Thanks Shanny, I couldn't remember what to put the molasses in, so I took the easy way out. The Ideal doesn't seem to bother me and BH has started using it in the coconut oil candy.
 
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I can't really tell a difference in the eggs except for how they look, but someone I visit regularly started raving about my egg dishes. I could understand him appreciating the frittata or even the deviled eggs, but when he raved about the hard-cooked ones, I had to wonder. I asked him where he bought his eggs, and it was at the regular large-chain grocery store. I buy the organic, free-range ones at Trader Joe's, so I wonder if there really is an appreciable difference because the chickens eat different foods.
 

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Shanny, how long do you bake per pound? It is just me here and I am wondering if I would be better off cutting the corned beef in half and cooking the rest later. I have such a hard time cutting meat properly, with the grain, across the grain, it all seems to turn to shoe leather....
 

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My roast was a five-pounder and it was roasting for prob'ly seven hours yesterday at 250° (120°). I started it at 500° (260°) for 10/12 minutes & then turned the heat down. I'm not awake enough yet to compute what that was per pound.

When they're cooked like this, they don't get to the falling apart stage like they do in a crockpot - they just get tender, and it makes it easier for slicing when they don't fall apart. I do like to slice pretty thin.
 
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