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Hi there
Yes, provocative Title. But for me lately it has been easy. Here's what I'm talking about. I've changed my eating habits and as a side effect almost lost 9 pounds in 2½ months. It sounds too simple to me, so the reason I'm posting this is to hear if anybody has experienced the same: Eating more healty and less, at the same time use less insulin, and you steadlily lose weight.

I've written a book on diabetes in my native language, and I'm currently translating to English. So instead of explaining it all, here's a paste of the first draft of that chapter in my book. Read if you will, and let me know if you've also had this experience. Thanks a lot.
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Draft:
"A lot of people struggle to lose weight without much success. And if they’re successful, most of them start to gain weight again. And the weight loss industry is massive. Add all the self-help books, the diet plans, the exercise industries, if you add all that up a lot of people make their livelihood by helping other people lose weight. Unfortunately the results don’t seem to live up to the promises, obesity is a rising problem in most Western countries. Well no more, in a few pages you’ll know how to lose weight, and not put it back on. I stumbled on this truth by coincidence, below I’ll describe how.

My own weight has always been pretty well controlled. It’s been very stable, not a lot of fluctuation. So weight has in itself never been an issue for me. Being diagnosed as diabetic of course helped my weight, because most of the fattening foods were no longer part of my daily intake. I did notice however that over the last 5-7 years, every time I was weighed at the twice-yearly outpatient session, I had gained a pound. It had been sneaking up on me. But still, my weight was not such that my diabetes doctor suggested that I should lose weight.

But my blood pressure had increased a little as well. And my cholesterol. My diabetes doctor told me, with regards to both of these measurements, that the values were normal for a non-diabetic of my age, but because of the increased risk we diabetics have of heart issues etc., that he would like my numbers to be lower.

I thought about that for a few days. Initially I was OK with the current situation, I was not over weight and again, my measurements were not critical for a non-diabetic, so how serious could it be? A kind of denial I guess. But it was about finding the right balance between quality of life and a long life. I had read about diabetics that had to weigh their food, was that going to be my life from now on? Or should I take pills to lower my blood pressure and cholesterol? None of these options were very tempting to me.

I read a pamphlet on cholesterol, what to eat and what not to eat. I was a heavy user of a few of the not-to-eats, like chocolate that I used when hypoglycemic. I showed the brochure to my wife who does most of the shopping and cooking. And we had a long talk; we were both willing to change mine and the family’s food to something better. On top of that I made some other changes to what I ate when away from home.

Here’s a brief summary of what I changed:
-Breakfast was unchanged
-Lunch was unchanged
-Dinner was changed from mostly meat, pasta/rice, vegetables, to a weekly average of fish 3 days, salads 2 days, meat 2 days
-I ate a little less for dinner
-I had always had a beer for dinner, that was exchanged for water (I like beer but when you drink it with food, you don’t really taste it anyway)
-At work we have the nightmare for all diabetics, free candy and chocolate. While keeping an eye of my blood sugar level of course, I had taken advantage of that on occasion. No more. If I’m hypoglycemic or close to it at work, I eat an apple, no candy.

Is that a dramatic change? I don’t think so. It was not like a diet, I don’t go to bed hungry. Do I miss anything? At the start I missed the beer at dinner, but only for a few days. Dinner itself is just as good as before, I like fish and I like salads, if it’s the right kind of fish and salads. You have to make it taste good, otherwise it becomes hard to keep doing it. I did miss the occasional candy at work, I still do. It’s not only about eating; it’s also about having a break, about rewarding yourself. Most have a coffee break; I don’t drink coffee, so now I have no excuse not to work!

These were the changes for my normal home/work/home days. But if we visited friends or went out to dinner or something, I ate like before. And I didn’t change my level of exercise in any way. I needed less insulin, especially for dinner. And since I now more or less only ate at the meals, nothing in between, I could exchange the NovoMix 50 to NovoMix 70 and later to NovoRapid. The latter is the fastest acting insulin, and it controls the blood sugar level better around meal times where it is needed, but has little effect on the hours until the next meal. So no snacks between meals, those snacks would raise the blood sugar level significantly.

And here comes the good news on weight. With less and different food intake I lost weight. When I measured my weight after a week, I had lost a pound. Knowing that I was writing this book, I started weighing myself every morning and noting down the result. I steadily lost about a pound per week. Some days my weight went down more than average and some days, perhaps after 1-2 beers and 2-course dinner with friends, I had gained a little weight. I could almost predict my weight based on the previous day’s intake of food and drink.

So is losing weight easy? It’s definitely simple to do, all you have to do is change your eating to reduce the calorie intake, and then stick to it. When calorie intake every day is a little less than the body needs, then you lose weight. At the time of this writing, I’ve lost 9 pounds in 2½ months. If I lose 5 pounds more, then I don’t want to be any thinner, so I’ll have to adjust my eating to get a stable weight. There’s no miracle cure, where you can lose weight and eat all that you want. Eat less, lose weight. It’s that simple, and we all knew it, right?"
 

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I think we all find what works for us. At diagnosis I was a touch overweight- 148 pounds but not a lot. My doctor suggested I try losing a little more. At first I thought he was crazy. But I started to change my "healthy diet". I cut out the oatmeal and healthy cereals, I cut out the brown rice and quinoa, I cut out the whole grain pastas and fruit. Before I knew it I had lost 10 pounds. I did a little more tweaking and cut out all boxed and processed foods and wheat products and I dropped to 112 pounds. I now have added a few organic carbs back in ( sprouted grain bread) and I am now 116-118. I eat 2000+ calories a day and still enjoy a glass or two of wine in the evenings. I am able to control my bgs without the use of insulin. I feel weight loss is so important to good bg control. Sometimes it takes trying different things to find what works for you. Congats on your weight loss.
 

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... I cut out the oatmeal and healthy cereals, I cut out the brown rice and quinoa, I cut out the whole grain pastas and fruit. Before I knew it I had lost 10 pounds. I did a little more tweaking and cut out all boxed and processed foods and wheat products and I dropped to 112 pounds. I now have added a few organic carbs back in ( sprouted grain bread) and I am now 116-118. I eat 2000+ calories a day and still enjoy a glass or two of wine in the evenings.
I'm able to lose weight on over 3,000 calories a day. I had seemed to hit a weight-loss plateau until I further reduced my carbs.

I am able to control my bgs without the use of insulin. I feel weight loss is so important to good bg control.
I totally agree - I think the weight loss is a huge component. Mine is mostly happening through a combo of proper diet and exercise, and I think that's what's made such a significant impact on my BG's, is that I'm doing both.
 

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i agree, no problem losing weight, just cut out the carbs and it will come off
 

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The scary part foe me right now is that I am still losing weight and eating and feeling full. When diagnosed in December with dt2 I weighed 175 pounds I am now at 150 this morning. A little scary because I am 5'8 and never been sow thin since junior high. I barely exercise but work as a massage therapist all day, so I do spend a lot of calories that maybe my diet is not furnishing.

I think I will need to talk to a nutritionist because I am planing on doing muscle training this week so I can a least keep the muscle Mass.

Sent from my iPod touch using Diabetes
 

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Reached a landmark today, I've gone down 10.0 kg in 10 months (=22 lbs). How? As described in my first post. And I'm now at a point where I don't want to lose anymore. The weight loss has also resulted in lower blood pressure, and those two combined has made my doctor agree to that I don't need medicine against high cholesterol any more :)
 
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