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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
For the past week I have radically changed my diet to carbs only from vegies increased my exercise regime ( leg muscles sore from gym yesterday lol) my BGL are improved mostly under 6 but finding my vision very blurry No energy I'm having to have afternoon naps also mood swings.
Is this normal? I'm hoping it is just my body coping with the changes.
Would appreciate any suggestions as unsure whether to continue with low carbs or try introducing a small amount to each meal
 

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High blood glucose causes pressure in the eye which distorts the shape of the eyeball. When bgs come down quickly, or even fluctuate widely during a single day, the eyeball shape distorts rapidly. Basically this change in shape changes the distance of the internal lens and has the effect of changing eyeglass prescriptions. When your eyes go blurry and you get nappy you might check to see if you're experiencing lows. With intense exercise lows can sometimes pop up as late as the next day. For me during exercise the onset of blurry vision and the tiredness has been an important indicator of a serious low.

This is a transient issue and is fairly common until lower bgs become the rule instead of the exception at which time vision for most returns to normal whether normal is good or bad.

Permanent myopia (nearsightedness) is more common in diabetics than the general population as well but this tends to be a progressive thing over time and not linked exclusively to a period of bg fluctuation as the transient is.

It can be best to wait on an eyeglass prescription until bgs are stabilized otherwise the prescription is a moving target and for some ends up not being needed at all. Even if glasses aren't obtained immediately regularly ophthalmological exams are always a good idea for diabetics.
 

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When the body has to learn to use fat instead of carbohydrates as energy it take a while where we will feel awful. It even got a name - the Atkins flue.
For most people it takes about 2 weeks before the body starts to feel fine, but sometimes it can take a bit longer.
It is important to eat enough fat and also drink a lot of water. Many also need to take magnesium supplements in this period. It helps for the muscles.
Blurry eye I think is because your BG has dropped quickly, and that will go back to normal after a while.
 

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You say you have changed your diet to carbs only from veggies. How many carbs are you eating per meal? If you eat a lot of carbs at one time, your pancreas will have to put out more insulin to move the glucose into the cells. This extra insulin could be making you tired. Many of us have had to reduce the carbs we eat and increase protein and fat. When you start to exercise you have to work with your body. If you are working the large muscle groups you should let muscles recover for 24 hours before working out again to limit soreness.
 

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You say you have changed your diet to carbs only from veggies. How many carbs are you eating per meal? If you eat a lot of carbs at one time, your pancreas will have to put out more insulin to move the glucose into the cells. This extra insulin could be making you tired. Many of us have had to reduce the carbs we eat and increase protein and fat. When you start to exercise you have to work with your body. If you are working the large muscle groups you should let muscles recover for 24 hours before working out again to limit soreness.
Good catch. How did I miss that? Must be my blurry vision. High carbs are exhausting. I hope it's a typo and meant to be low carb.
 

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I believe Muck is saying that he is only getting his carbs from veggies...no starches. However, with that said, you do need to watch your veggies as well because some have higher carbs than others. Also, the others are correct that when you bring your bg's down quickly, it can cause other body functions to go a little wacky until your system adjusts to the lower numbers. Hopefully Muck you are checking and testing your bg's alot while going to drastically down with eating habits. It is very important that you know whether you are going too low or high or normal. Your body must adjust and that takes a lot of energy so you might be feeling rather sleepy midday and your eyes are trying to get used to it. I know when my endo put me on insulin, she told me I would feel rather crappy for a good 3-6 weeks because my body had to get used to lower bg's. If it continues for too long, I would certainly have things checked out to make sure nothing else is going on. Otherwise, perhaps you can take some Vitamin D3, or some other supplement to help with energy. Keep us up to date on your progress. Take care.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks everyone for your help & input, what I was trying to say was I have changed from having carbs ie bread, pasta, rice etc at each meal to having protein only for breakfast, & lunch is either salad with fish or homemade vegie soup & dinner is protein with vegies mainly cabbage, sprouts, zucchini, leeks etc, I just wasnt sure that my diet changes were causing the blurred vision & tiredness, I think I am just self doubting that I am on the right track & scared myself, but I did have an eye test recently which was fine & nothing wrong with a little nap in middle of day, Ive currently given up work so now have time for naps etc lol.
As for my exercise yes I am only going every 2 / 3 days & mixing up with cardio one visit & weights/resistance the next, the days I am not going to gym I mow lawns etc or go walking wit dogs.
I will keep going with my low carbs for another week or so as my numbers have improved so something is working, I think my body is just getting used to the changes will be trial & error for a while, also with diabetes educator insisting that I must have 2 or 3 servings with every meal I was telling myself that she must know best but hey you know what it is MY body & I have to find out what is best for me, this forum has given me the courage to make changes, so thank you all & take care xx
 
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Muck, I know from recent experience even mild vision issues can be exhausting in themselves. Here's hoping all works out well for you soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks GPHX a part of me is excited too that I have taken control, will now start counting carbs in my vegies & salads & see how they are affecting my numbers
 

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Thanks everyone for your help & input, what I was trying to say was I have changed from having carbs ie bread, pasta, rice etc at each meal to having protein only for breakfast, & lunch is either salad with fish or homemade vegie soup & dinner is protein with vegies mainly cabbage, sprouts, zucchini, leeks etc, I just wasnt sure that my diet changes were causing the blurred vision & tiredness, I think I am just self doubting that I am on the right track & scared myself, but I did have an eye test recently which was fine & nothing wrong with a little nap in middle of day, Ive currently given up work so now have time for naps etc lol.
As for my exercise yes I am only going every 2 / 3 days & mixing up with cardio one visit & weights/resistance the next, the days I am not going to gym I mow lawns etc or go walking wit dogs.
I will keep going with my low carbs for another week or so as my numbers have improved so something is working, I think my body is just getting used to the changes will be trial & error for a while, also with diabetes educator insisting that I must have 2 or 3 servings with every meal I was telling myself that she must know best but hey you know what it is MY body & I have to find out what is best for me, this forum has given me the courage to make changes, so thank you all & take care xx
From your brief description, it sounds like you are seriously malnourished especially in the area of energy and that could explain a lot.

Your cells need an energy source which is called ATP. On a high-carb diet, nearly all this ATP is manufactured from glucose. It is made INSIDE the cell, so that requires that glucose get into the cell. This is the work of insulin and unfortunately, it is also what is "broken" or impaired in T2 diabetics. If there is little glucose forthcoming from diet and/or if it cannot make it into the cells where it is needed because of insulin resistance and/or insufficient insulin, the cells will begin to "starve".

Nearly all cells in your body can make ATP from one or both of two other sources: FFAs (free fatty acids) or ketone bodies. Both of these are the result of dietary fat. Ketone bodies are the better of the two and can be used by nearly all cells. The brain, for example, can use ketone bodies just fine but FFAs cannot cross the blood brain barrier. Ketone bodies are only available with the COMBINATION of both very limited carbohydrates in the diet AND abundant fats. "Low-carb" eating alone will not produce them.

When you reduce carbs and substitute with protein it is mostly self-defeating. Protein can be used for tissue repair and the like and the excess can be converted to glucose by your liver. There is almost no chance you were not getting plenty of protein prior to this for cell repair. So, the extra protein eaten in lieu of the carbs mostly became glucose. Not only does this negate the possible benefits of reducing carbs on blood sugar, it just makes your body work a lot harder deriving all this glucose from protein. In the extreme case, this is actually fatal. You can google "rabbit starvation" for details.

So, the symptoms you are experiencing are not at all unexpected. The solution is to leave your protein consumption alone - it should be around 16% of total calories - and for every 9g of carbs you reduce, substitute 4g of fat.

That will keep your energy in balance and in fact at the cellular level you will be better off since it is only ATP from glucose which is impaired and ATP from FFAs or ketones is working and is unaffected by diabetes. This is why people who master the LC/HF diet experience huge increases in energy and mental alertness.

Eating too little fat and too much protein is a very common error made by many people when they first attempt low-carb eating and is understandable after some 50 years of anti-fat hysteria. It is difficult to overcome all that mental conditioning and face what is really a healthy diet - certainly for T2 diabetics and arguably for the population at large.

Useful Link
 

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...The solution is to leave your protein consumption alone - it should be around 16% of total calories - and for every 9g of carbs you reduce, substitute 4g of fat.

Eating too little fat and too much protein is a very common error made by many people when they first attempt low-carb eating and is understandable after some 50 years of anti-fat hysteria...
There's lots of good information in smorgan's post, but I will play devil's advocate here and somewhat disagree with one thing - and that is the percentage of calories from protein sources.

How much protein you need will vary greatly from person to person depending on their gender, age, muscle-mass, physical activity level, etc.

Personally, As someone that does strenuous exercise, I like to see anywhere from 35-45% of my calories coming from protein - it's what works best for maintaining/repairing my muscle tissue, and for keeping me with decent energy levels. (I get most of my energy from FAT sources still, which is for the best, imho.)

I feel my best with approximately:

35-45% calories from protein
40-50% calories from fat
5-15% calories from carbohydrate (I have more or less carbs depending on my exercise levels)

Everyone is different - but for anyone doing daily exercise, especially if it's at a high-moderate to strenuous level (whether jogging, running, cycling, weight-training, elliptical machines, stair-climbers, whatever...) they will very-likely require more protein in their diets. Also, if trying to perform (at a competitive level) they may even require more carbohydrate in their diets. (Which is why my carb intake varies depending on my activity level).
 

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There's lots of good information in smorgan's post, but I will play devil's advocate here and somewhat disagree with one thing - and that is the percentage of calories from protein sources.

How much protein you need will vary greatly from person to person depending on their gender, age, muscle-mass, physical activity level, etc.

Personally, As someone that does strenuous exercise, I like to see anywhere from 35-45% of my calories coming from protein - it's what works best for maintaining/repairing my muscle tissue, and for keeping me with decent energy levels. (I get most of my energy from FAT sources still, which is for the best, imho.)

I feel my best with approximately:

35-45% calories from protein
40-50% calories from fat
5-15% calories from carbohydrate (I have more or less carbs depending on my exercise levels)

Everyone is different - but for anyone doing daily exercise, especially if it's at a high-moderate to strenuous level (whether jogging, running, cycling, weight-training, elliptical machines, stair-climbers, whatever...) they will very-likely require more protein in their diets. Also, if trying to perform (at a competitive level) they may even require more carbohydrate in their diets. (Which is why my carb intake varies depending on my activity level).
You raise a very interesting point. It certainly is the conventional wisdom that if working out strenuously you need extra protein for muscle rebuilding. Sounds sensible, but I've read other opinions which call that into question. Since I'm no bodybuilder and do only very moderate exercise, I didn't pay very close attention to the various arguments.

Still, 45% seems awfully high to me. I find it hard to believe that all that is really used for muscle repair just from working out. I'd be really curious to know how much of it was actually just converted into glucose and consumed. I don't know if there is any way to determine that.

There are also high-performance athletes who perform in ketosis presumably using ketones/FFAs primarily or even exclusively as their energy source so I don't think there is ever an actual "need" for carbs for working out in general, but all this gets pretty complicated so I guess it could be a shortcut or seem necessary in some situations.

I'm wary of high protein although I know of no definitive proof that it is harmful. I do know it's a negative when it comes to BG control as beyond a certain minimum it definitely contributes glucose to your blood.

So I would think that if one is not doing vigorous weight training, keeping it to the average of 15% or 16% is the most prudent choice.
 

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Oh, and Beefy note one little point. You said that:

it's what works best for maintaining/repairing my muscle tissue, and for keeping me with decent energy levels
Muscle repair yes but note that according to the biology involved, the only way protein could have anything to do with energy levels is if it is doing that by being converted into glucose in the liver and then used in that form. Proteins are not a source of "energy". The only sources of that are glucose, FFAs and ketones or in terms of diet: carbs and fats.
 

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And protein IS converted to glucose, in the absence of carbohydrates, right? A secondary source, maybe, but still a source.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Lchf

Smorgan currently reading the link you posted for me thank you, hard to get my head around that high fat is good, (hello cheese, bacon & eggs), yes I have probably increased my protein levels over the last week not to a great extent though, will need to work out my % of carbs, protein & fats, will have a look at apps on my iphone, I am so excited.

One question though, my cholesterol level was 8.6 I have managed to get it down with help from Crestor to 4.4, with a diet higher in fat than what I was normally having what effect will this have on my cholesterol??

I can see I will be spending most of today on computer

I am so grateful for the info & time that you & the others have given me many thanks :)
 

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And protein IS converted to glucose, in the absence of carbohydrates, right? A secondary source, maybe, but still a source.
Yes, that's what I meant. But in the blood, its just glucose and your cells can't tell if it came from carbs or from protein. (They also can't tell if it came from "heart healthy carbs" or pure sugar, as you know.)

In other words, proteins are not a source of energy unless and until they are converted to glucose. When utilized "normally" as amino acids they are used for cell repair and not for energy. Once you get to the bloodstream, the only sources of energy are glucose, FFAs and ketones.
 

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Smorgan currently reading the link you posted for me thank you, hard to get my head around that high fat is good, (hello cheese, bacon & eggs), yes I have probably increased my protein levels over the last week not to a great extent though, will need to work out my % of carbs, protein & fats, will have a look at apps on my iphone, I am so excited.

One question though, my cholesterol level was 8.6 I have managed to get it down with help from Crestor to 4.4, with a diet higher in fat than what I was normally having what effect will this have on my cholesterol??

I can see I will be spending most of today on computer

I am so grateful for the info & time that you & the others have given me many thanks :)
Muck, I also have difficulty with cholesterol and triglycerides being high. I also take Crestor for cholesterol, and at last count it was in a pretty good range, however triglycerides go hand-in-hand with blood sugar, so if one is high the other will be too. I do know that everyone here has seen significant drops in their lipids by using good saturated fat, and I am trying to do my best with that, but like you a little afraid :eek: I am hoping when I go back for blood work at end of November my lipids will show that improvement as well. I can tell you one thing I have noticed; I used to have "hot flashes" alot that I thought were associated with being perimenopausal. I'm not having those "hot flashes" like I used to. It really makes me wonder if it was more my high triglycerides causing the "hot flashes" more so than the perimenopause. We'll see. Only time will tell. I do however have to include more good healthy fats since I seem to still be struggling with getting my blood sugar down to normal range. It has certainly improved with the use of basal and bolus insulin, but I'd like to get it to normal range without having to pump more and more insulin in to do it. Hopefully I'll get there. Just need to really incorporate the fat more so than the protein and little bit of carb I am eating. I did not really realize until just reading some posts by smorgan and beefy that for every so many carbs you reduce, increase fat by so much. That just clicked in my head that I don't think I'm meeting that. I'll have to be more conscious of how much fat I'm eating.
 

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Naynay - my triglycerides are in normal range now and my bs is fairly well controlled, and my hot flashes continue in full force!
 

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...Muscle repair yes but note that according to the biology involved, the only way protein could have anything to do with energy levels is if it is doing that by being converted into glucose in the liver and then used in that form. Proteins are not a source of "energy". The only sources of that are glucose, FFAs and ketones or in terms of diet: carbs and fats.
I don't mean the protein gives me energy (it may or may not get converted to glucose over time) ... I meant that keeping my protein around 45% (max) and having carbs and fat balance out the rest allows me the energy I need. The vast majority of my energy requirements come from fat intake.

FYI when I say I workout strenuously, I'm quite possibly UNDER-stating the amounts of exercise I do.

Yesterday, as an example, I rode my bike (indoors, on my fluid trainer) for 2 hours at a very-intense level (about the same intensity as averaging 29km/h or 18mph on the road), and also did 15 minutes of core work and 200 push-ups. This is a medium amount of exercise for me. I've been known to spend over 5 hours of hard exercising in a day (IE: cycling in the mountains doing lots of 14-15% grade mountain climbs, while overall averaging 28km/h or more). Usually whatever I do is pretty punishing on my muscles, and there's a great deal of tissue breakdown which needs to be rebuilt.

I'm not sure where you get your 15-16% statistics ... most experts agree on anywhere from 10-35% depending on who you talk to, some bodybuilders eat more, but I personally feel most people don't need more than 25% of their calories from protein unless doing serious bodybuilding.

I'm an exception. If I don't keep between 35-45% of my calories from protein I lose muscle mass with the exercise I do, especially on days where I really strain my skeletal muscles as opposed to just doing aerobic exercise. (IE: Hill-climbing days, etc.)
 

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The recommandation of protein here in Norway is between 1 gram and 2,5 gram for each kilo bodymass.
I am not active since I have lots of health issue, and need only 1 gram pr.kilo bodymass.
One of my sons who is an active long distance runner and compete much, exercise twice a day, and do Interval Training 3 times a week + has a fysical job, needs 2,5 gram protein for each kilo bodymass.
I don`t think it is a good thing to increase the protein to much as it really makes the kidney work hard.
 
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