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So I was watching Dexter the showtime show and one of the characters used insulin to kill a victim. I have low sugar at night and I am a little scared that something bad can happen to me. I looked on the Internet about low sugar deaths but I didn't really find any creditable information. Just wondering if anyone in the forum may have more Information. I saw something about a mom that over injected insulin for her kid and he was in the hospital for a while and they finally got his sugar up. I have also seen that you would have to injEct a whole vial (fast acting) maybe two to kill an adult. I just kind of want to know how much risk I am taking. I tend to have low sugars that cause me to wake up so I am worried. I guess I want to know so I know the importance of my bed time sugars.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you Agjitater, I read that and Now I am scared. I need to work on my bedtime ritual. Fortunately I am still able to notice when My sugar is low, I guess my body still detect low Glucose levels and releaseso-called counter-regulatory hormones include epinephrine (adrenaline), glucagon, cortisol, and growth hormone.

Has anyone had hypoglycemic unawareness happen to them? I am glad that I still have it, but I want to do what I can to keep it. I wake up in the middle of the night if I am low, thank god. I guess I have to keep from going low so that I can keep my awareness.


The story of the 23 year old is very close to what I do. I do my sporting event and come home and snack, bolus, eat dinner bolus. I do take care with my bed time ritual, I need 2-4 hours after eating to be sure that I will be okay through the night. My girlfriend doesn't understand why I stay up so late, I have told her , but she doesn't "hear me". I am taking from this article that I need to be even more careful. I am down to maybe 1-2 times a month where I wake up with lows. I need to get that to a lower percentage. Everytime it has happened, I have forgotten to do my ritual, because I just fall asleep.
 

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Yes I have hypoglycimic unawareness thats what forced me to go on a pump and a CGMS. Found out that my lowest insulin needs were from shortly after mid night until around 3 or 4 in the morning and then they go up a lot and drop off around 10 in the morning. I have suffered many hypos that resulted in convulsions and yes coma for short periods of time. I didnt give you that info to scare you though but so you could make an educated decision. Take care of you and good luck
 

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What type of insuling are you using?
In August I woke up in the middle of the night with my BG at 32. Scared me very badly. Shortly after that my Dr. switched me from the NPH to Lantus. To my knowledge I've had no more night time lows since switching to Lantus. Every now and then I set an alarm for 2 or 3 am just to check and so far, so good.
You should ask your doctor about it. Your story sounds so familiar, the staying up later than you want, just to make sure it's safe to go to sleep.
 

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So I was watching Dexter the showtime show and one of the characters used insulin to kill a victim. I have low sugar at night and I am a little scared that something bad can happen to me. I looked on the Internet about low sugar deaths but I didn't really find any creditable information. Just wondering if anyone in the forum may have more Information. I saw something about a mom that over injected insulin for her kid and he was in the hospital for a while and they finally got his sugar up. I have also seen that you would have to injEct a whole vial (fast acting) maybe two to kill an adult. I just kind of want to know how much risk I am taking. I tend to have low sugars that cause me to wake up so I am worried. I guess I want to know so I know the importance of my bed time sugars.
Yes it can be scary and if you have little or no awareness of hypos then it can be dangerous too. I have been on a pump now for 4 years and what a difference it has made to my life. I lost my awareness totally and was always being 'brought round' by family or friends. Night time too I had to have someone with me if my husband was away. Since being fitted with the pump my awareness is back and yes I do still have hypos but not as severe and with much more warning so I can treat them. Can you access a pump from your medical people, it could be worth a try?
 
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