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I have communicated with 2 medical professioners that told me that diabetes meds only treat the symtoms of the diease and not the cause. The meds does more damage than good. If they are right; why do other doctors insist on me taking medication? I am told that as long as my numbers are in a certain range the medical doctors are please and their treatment will not go beyond that extent.

With all of that said; my questions are; why are the causes of diabetes not being treated? Is it possible to treat the cause along with the symtoms? Can the cause be treated?
 

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If anyone knew the causes, there'd prob'ly be a cure close behind. I think the jury is still out on the causes.

Exactly which meds do they think cause more damage than good? My guess is that these so-called professioners are talking through their respective hats.
 

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Hi. Jenny Ruhl (Blood Sugar 101) presents some great information about the drugs available for treating T2 diabetes. If I remember correctly, she falls squarely in the camp that says aside from Metformin, the downsides of most diabetes meds outweigh the benefits. I do not know if she is correct, but her analysis is compelling.

In the interest of full disclosure, I am a T1 and only use insulin. Just thought you might want to look her up.

Jen
 

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There is no cure for diabetes at present, therefore no treatment for the causes. And from what I have been reading lately, there seems to be a variety of causes and a variety of markers indicating higher risk for diabetes.

I would partially agree with some of the doctors as oral medication can have some serious side effects depending on the individual. Unless you are allergic to some types of insulin, generally there are not side effects from insulin. Plus many (but not all) oral medications force the pancreas to produce more insulin, thereby damaging it to the point of not working over time, making insulin treatment necessary.

If you are able to control your blood glucose with exercise and nutrition, go for it.

Jen is right about Jenny's position. You may read her at http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/ .
 

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I have communicated with 2 medical professioners that told me that diabetes meds only treat the symtoms of the diease and not the cause. The meds does more damage than good. If they are right; why do other doctors insist on me taking medication? I am told that as long as my numbers are in a certain range the medical doctors are please and their treatment will not go beyond that extent.

With all of that said; my questions are; why are the causes of diabetes not being treated? Is it possible to treat the cause along with the symtoms? Can the cause be treated?
If they knew the cause, they would have a cure :) Some oral meds for T2 can possibly hasten the progression of the disease by forcing the pancreas to work even harder, so I will agree on that point. But....if your disease is at a point where you need the medication, then you just need it. Not much choice there. I do however think it would be better to start more T2's on insulin sooner...I think it would at least preserve some of their pancreas function in the long run.
 

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I'm firmly of the belief that we are better off without medications of any kind if we have any possibility of managing our conditions naturally through the power of by diet and lifestyle - or, at least, to use as little of any medication as we can possibly manage with if we have no other option - even insulin.

Quite simply, I can never see the point in a diabetic putting medication of any kind into our bodies just to compensate for wanting to eat sugary or cabohydrate foods. In my opinion, surely, the safer long-term appproach is to eat less of the foods that cause the problems.

That is my opinion for what it is worth!

John
 

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I'm firmly of the belief that we are better off without medications of any kind if we have any possibility of managing our conditions naturally through the power of by diet and lifestyle - or, at least, to use as little of any medication as we can possibly manage with if we have no other option - even insulin.

Quite simply, I can never see the point in a diabetic putting medication of any kind into our bodies just to compensate for wanting to eat sugary or cabohydrate foods. In my opinion, surely, the safer long-term appproach is to eat less of the foods that cause the problems.

That is my opinion for what it is worth!

John
Oh, I agree...the least amount of medication you have to take the better. But, once it gets to the point that you simply have to to take medicine, then you just have to do it. I think sometimes people fall into the idea that if you have to take medicine (pills or insulin) then you are somehow failing or being lazy as a diabetic. That simply isnt true. Some T2's are lucky and will always be able to control their disease through diet and exercise. They are blessed with a pancreas that continues to function normally and their insulin resistance is at a level that it stays manageable.

Thats one of the difficulties of T2 over T1 I think. T1 is mostly straightforward, your pancreas does not work...sucks...but you know what you are dealing with. Some T1's develop some insulin resistance also, but it usually isnt severe and its generally responsive fairly easily to oral meds. There are *so* many levels of T2. First off...you are dealing with insulin resistance in varying degrees. I have seen some that have a fairly low resistance up to people with resistance so high that it takes huge amounts of insulin to deal with. Thats where moderate exercise can really benefit a T2 since it will help lower resistance....but those with severe resistance have a very difficult time of it. People think they are being lazy when they really arent. When you combine a failing pancreas with the insulin resistance, things get even harder to manage. Just using myself as an example, I have experienced beta cell failure now. I make very little insulin on my own....*plus* I have to factor in the insulin resistance I have on top of it. Sometimes I can bolus for a meal and it covers me great....sometimes the exact same meal puts me over 200 and I have difficulty getting it to come down. *shrug* all we can do is the best we can :)

The dratted disease affects us all differently and thats what makes places like this so great. No matter which aspect of diabetes we are fighting, at least we all can support each other in our common goal of staying as healthy as we can :)
 
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