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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sometimes i have a gap of 2 to 3 hours between the rapid (novrapid) running out and the next meal/snack.

Sometimes I take hourly tests in these windows to see how the basal is working.

This can show, for example, that too much basal is working if the results are dropping.

Are there any dangers with this approach as an additional mini test to go along with main basal testing?

I wouldn't do this after exercising.
 

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Sometimes i have a gap of 2 to 3 hours between the rapid (novrapid) running out and the next meal/snack.

Sometimes I take hourly tests in these windows to see how the basal is working.

This can show, for example, that too much basal is working if the results are dropping.

Are there any dangers with this approach as an additional mini test to go along with main basal testing?

I wouldn't do this after exercising.
There is no harm in testing frequently beyond the cost in test strips and possibly sore fingers :)

However, what you are looking for is a pattern over time and one isolated strange result should not be allowed to derail your basic long term strategy.

By all means keep a note of the figures and ideally what you had to eat beforehand and what exercise you did - then after a few days look at the figures and try to see what pattern is there before you consider changing your medication regime.

John
 

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Just adding to what John said, you can also try missing out one meal and its Novorapid dose completely and BG test at intervals through to just before your next meal. This will help you see when the Novo, plus carbs from the last meal, wears off and get a steady baseline reading over some hours. If you do this, start on a day where your BG's start within your target range so that any drift away from this can be seen clearly. Also it's probably best to try to be as active as usual.

Another check you could consider is one during the night at between about 3am and 4am. If your basal dose is right then your BG at 3-4am and at rising for breakfast should be about the same as when you went to bed, or at least within your target range. This is also useful for adjusting your bed time snack, if you have one.

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Just adding to what John said, you can also try missing out one meal and its Novorapid dose completely and BG test at intervals through to just before your next meal. This will help you see when the Novo, plus carbs from the last meal, wears off and get a steady baseline reading over some hours. If you do this, start on a day where your BG's start within your target range so that any drift away from this can be seen clearly. Also it's probably best to try to be as active as usual.

Another check you could consider is one during the night at between about 3am and 4am. If your basal dose is right then your BG at 3-4am and at rising for breakfast should be about the same as when you went to bed, or at least within your target range. This is also useful for adjusting your bed time snack, if you have one.

Steve
Steve, as you suggest I'm missing the odd meal and not having a before bed snack in order to check my basal.

However, it's a pain and some people won't like missing meals.
It's more of whether the "mini test" result would be reliable enough to suggest you do or don't need to do proper basal testing.
 

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Sometimes i have a gap of 2 to 3 hours between the rapid (novrapid) running out and the next meal/snack.

Sometimes I take hourly tests in these windows to see how the basal is working.

This can show, for example, that too much basal is working if the results are dropping.

Are there any dangers with this approach as an additional mini test to go along with main basal testing?
Be careful with your assumptions. You probably use a value of 4 hours for your pump, but rapid insulin lasts closer to 6.5 hours. It can vary depending on dosage level. You may be adjusting basal for difficult-to-detect boluses.

Have a read:
An Accurate DIA Prevents Excessive Insulin Stacking | Diabetesnet.com
 

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Steve, as you suggest I'm missing the odd meal and not having a before bed snack in order to check my basal.

However, it's a pain and some people won't like missing meals.
It's more of whether the "mini test" result would be reliable enough to suggest you do or don't need to do proper basal testing.
True it's a bit of a pain, and a grumbling stomach. This method helps me, though. The night time check is pretty good and I'd recommend this. I think the missed meal method may help more quickly identify your best basal dose. But doing lots of extra tests as you suggest will still help you optimize your dose, at the expense of sore fingers and probably just take a bit longer overall.
 

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