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Personal experience of Dr Haroun Gajraj:

Why I've ditched statins for good
I don't remember if I posted my lipid profile shown below here before, but no harm even if it is a repeat post :)

The attachment shows my lipid profile at the time of diagnosis about 9 years ago and also just one year ago. (Incidentally, the profile improved even more when tested in Nov 2013 but I don't have the numbers with me right now.)

My good doctor continued to prescribe statin because "total cholesterol should be below 4 mmol/L (156 mg/dL) for diabetics" even though the level recommended for non-diabetics is below 5 mmol/L (195 mg/dL). As before, I continued not to take the prescribed statin :).

I did not improve my lipid profile over these years by "upping" fat or going low carb. Just "upped" vegetables and fruits, increased exercise, and did some portion control.

Regards,
Rad
 

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OK, I think this makes a rather interesting side-by-side. Rad and I started out in pretty similar condition. He shared his numbers after nine years on a high-plant matter diet. I'll put them next to mine after half that time on a highly-carnivorous LC/HF and low vegetable matter (not zero) diet:

Rad Before Rad After Salim Before Salim After
Triglycerides 190 101 158 51
HDL 29 48 34 68
LDL 99 94 160 159
Total 165 162 235 237
TC/HDL Ratio 5.7 3.4 6.9 3.5
TriG/HDL Ratio 6.6 2.1 4.6 0.75

It looks like LC/HF did better on the most important numbers. TC/HDL was basically the same (rounding). TriG/HDL, which many view as a better predictor was substantially better on LC/HF, as was HDL.

Moreover, according to the article, higher TC correlates to lower mortality across the board for women. For men, both very low and very high TC correlate to increased CVD (no causality proven, just correlation across large populations). According to that data, optimum TC for men is between 5 and 7 or in US units, between 193 and 270. I'm sitting happy right in the middle of that range!

It seems that by any measure - except the pretty well discredited total cholesterol or total LDL - my CVD risk is substantially down after 4.5 years of highly carnivorous LC/HF.
 
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When I was first diagnosed late last July, my doctor included 10 mg of Lipitor (the lowest available dose) in his prescription. At the time, my cholesterol levels were hovering near the dividing line between "okay" and "too high". A month or so later I stopped taking the Lipitor as I didn't like the side effects (weakness and muscle aches); the last straw for me was finding out that elevated blood glucose levels were a known side-effect.

My cholesterol levels have all improved, likely to my getting my blood sugar under some measure of control, plus eating LCHF. In particular, my triglycerides went down by 60%. Lipitor is still on the prescription; I just throw it away now.
 

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My main point was that I didn't have to take statin to bring my lipid profile to a normal and healthy level. Another point was that I didn't have to "up the fat" and go lchf way to do that. Incidentally, I never intend to go the carnivorous way. I am pretty confident that my present lifestyle, and eating what I consider a reasonable amount of all necessary macro and micro nutrients, and enjoying very much what I eat, will keep me fit and healthy till the end :)

Regards,
Rad
 

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We are an omnivorous species. It makes intuitive sense that, as individuals, we may naturally range along a spectrum from obligate carnivore to obligate herbivore. If that's true, the ability to move from one part of the spectrum to the next -- while maintaining or improving good health -- is likely to vary, as well.

Throw in artificial foods, or omit them, and that may well account for additional variations we see among us that are not otherwise explained by genetics or structural differences.

Or not.
 

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My main point was that I didn't have to take statin to bring my lipid profile to a normal and healthy level. Another point was that I didn't have to "up the fat" and go lchf way to do that. Incidentally, I never intend to go the carnivorous way. I am pretty confident that my present lifestyle, and eating what I consider a reasonable amount of all necessary macro and micro nutrients, and enjoying very much what I eat, will keep me fit and healthy till the end :)

Regards,
Rad
And I guess the point I was trying to make is that two VERY different diets gave rather similar results. OK, so LC/HF carnivorous "won" :), but it was close. I wonder what that means?

I remember you boasting one time that you could even eat gulab jaman (mega-dose of sugar AND carbs), but did you drastically reduce sugar overall after diagnosis? Maybe that's the common thread here. Maybe Dr. Lustig was right and the fructose molecule really is that toxic and to blame for a lot of things.

We can't say it's just the fat because you didn't do that. Likewise, we can't say it's the heavily "plant-based diet" because I didn't do that. And yet we both "succeeded". Could it be that we both reduced fructose and that was actually more critical than all the other elements we love to talk about?

What do you think?
 
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The most probable explanation is that the reduced carbs even if done by reduced portions reduced insulin resistance enough to make you more carb tolerant. The body has a protection mechanics that it works with food, drugs or in this case the hormone insulin too much and with time it just develop tolerance. That is why most medications require a bigger and bigger dosage and with time they may stop working all together. By reducing your circulating insulin that a highly insulin resistance individual will produce when ingesting carbs it dials down their tolerance and your insulin function may improve. This may also help reverse fatty liver even if there is not much weight loss, because lipids metabolism in the liver improve with the better functioning insulin. Because insulin is also involved in lipid metabolism improved control improve lipids profile for most people.

In my opinion being vegetarian makes the diabetic diet more difficult and may on the long term create negative health problems. It does to most healthy long term vegetarians I have known and there were many. Being diabetic it just compound the possibilities of negative effects.
 

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I may also add that exercise has many health benefits specially for diabetics. It require less insulin to get the glucose out of the blood into the muscle, reducing insulin resistance. It will make you require less insulin and make the muscle more glucose receptive. It will also reduce TG and help reduce circulating free fatty acids that will improve lipids profile.
 

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The most probable explanation is that the reduced carbs even if done by reduced portions reduced insulin resistance enough to make you more carb tolerant. The body has a protection mechanics that it works with food, drugs or in this case the hormone insulin too much and with time it just develop tolerance. That is why most medications require a bigger and bigger dosage and with time they may stop working all together. By reducing your circulating insulin that a highly insulin resistance individual will produce when ingesting carbs it dials down their tolerance and your insulin function may improve. This may also help reverse fatty liver even if there is not much weight loss, because lipids metabolism in the liver improve with the better functioning insulin. Because insulin is also involved in lipid metabolism improved control improve lipids profile for most people.

In my opinion being vegetarian makes the diabetic diet more difficult and may on the long term create negative health problems. It does to most healthy long term vegetarians I have known and there were many. Being diabetic it just compound the possibilities of negative effects.
Yeah, except as I recall, Rad is not very low-carb. I don't recall his numbers but maybe he can chime in. What I's also really like to know in addition to the lipid and glucose numbers are liver condition, visceral fat and LDL particle size/particle count. My suspicion is that LC/HF uber-carnivore would do better on all of those.
 

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If you reduce portions, change for types of less rapid acting carbohydrates and you exercise you change insulin dynamics and probably end up with less insulin resistance.

Have your read Prof. Richard Feinman contrary views on Lustig fructose ideas.

Wait a Minute, Lustig. The Threat of Fructophobia. And the Opportunity. | Richard David Feinman
Yeah, it's REALLY weak. It's filled with total speculation and he doesn't back up much of what he says. It's really more of a "political" objection than a scientific one because of Lustig's crack about taxing sugar (instead of fat).

I found it utterly useless. If he has anything to back up his wild claims and accusations, he should bring it!
 
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