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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum


Necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum ("NLD") is a rash that occurs on the lower legs. It is more common in women, and there are usually several spots. They are slightly raised shiny red-brown patches. The centers are often yellowish and may develop open sores that are slow to heal. Often a biopsy is needed to diagnose NLD.

NLD usually occurs more often in people with diabetes, in people with a family history of diabetes or a tendency to get diabetes. Still, the exact cause of NLD in not known. A similar condition that is often confused with NLD is granuloma annulare. Similar to the association of NLD and diabetes, it appears that a high percentage of persons with disseminated granuloma annulare have diabetes mellitus. The individual spots typically consist of a circular array of reddish to brown and slightly translucent bumps.

Treatment of NLD is difficult. Sometimes it responds to topical cortisone creams, especially if covered ("occluded") with an airtight dressing. Cortisone injections can also be used to treat NLD. These are more effective than cortisone creams. NLD usually goes through stages of activity and inactivity. One is not able to predict when the condition will flare. Ultraviolet light treatment has been found to control this condition when it is flaring. A baby aspirin each day, and other medications that thin the blood, such as Trental, may help NLD. Other medications, including prednisone pills (steroids) are used in difficult or severe cases.


(I am posting this skin condition since it is the one I have).

I noticed a dime-size red spot on my left ankle when I was 19.
It slowly grew bigger. My Endocrinologist knew exactly what it
was and gave me some Hydrocortisone cream.

At age 25, my 2 yr. old Son accidently drove his big ride-on truck
into my ankle. (That hurt like H*LL! :rolleyes:) Soon after, I had 2-3 ulcers on it. I got some Sulpha cream at the Drs., wrapped my ankle in gauze and the ulcers were gone in about 2 weeks. The spot is now
as big as a baseball although it is skin-coloured and not active. It
doesn't bother me since I can't see it unless I look at it in a mirror,
which I don't. These spots do not hurt or itch(unless of course, someone drives a truck into it :D ).

If you have what sounds like this condition(It is now known as NL,
since it happens to many non-diabetics also), see your Dr. so they
can prescribe a treatment for you. Protect the spot(s) so nothing
hits it accidently.
 

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I have what you have Terri, I got a kick in my left shin when i was 16 and it started out like what looked like a bruise and it has kept getting bigger and bigger. I have ulcers every year on it due to just knocking my leg etc. im 24 and it has affected my confidence so much, its big and red and very unsightly. My fiance is great about it THANK GOD i know that there are no treatments out there that can get rid of it but i am going to try Laser Surgery maybe that might help. :)

How is ur leg now, has it improved?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hello There and Welcome: :) Good to see You from Ireland.

You probably would have gotten NLD(NL) even without the trauma to your knee. I got the spot on my left ankle when I was 19 and I didn't get it from an injury to my ankle. As I mentioned, my Son(when he was little) accidently hit the NLD on my ankle years later when I was 25, which caused the ulcers on it.

My NLD is still on my ankle but like I mentioned it has been inactive for many years. I only had the ulcers on it that one time. I was going to have the light therapy for it but just never got around to it. I have been on Prednisone(I don't recommend that drug) and a blood thinner for my RA plus baby Aspirin for years. Perhaps that is what has been keeping the NLD inactive.

Nice to hear that your Fiance isn't bothered by it. Mine didn't think nothing of it either. That made me feel better and I haven't thought much about it. There are a lot worst things out there and more important things to be concerned with. But do try to protect the area so that the NLD doesn't get injured.

Years ago someone had mentioned skin graphs which doesn't make any sense to me and doesn't seem like that would be a Good treatment for it. It could become active again and then the graphing would be a waste. Although the "experts" don't know what causes it, I'm sure that it is caused by something internal since non-Diabetics get it also. Just another condition. Good Luck with whatever treatment that you and your Dr. decide to use. Try not to worry too much about it. Sometime it does disappear on its own. ;)
 

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Necrobiosis lipoidica

:)
Hi there Terrie,
I would just like to thank you for putting you info on here about NLD.
I am a Type1 diabetic of now 31yrs and have had NLD since I was about 18yrs and it has increased in size on my left shin and I also have various spots on my right. I have had some ulcers over the years some that were rather difficult to heal but onward and upward as they say LOL.
I hope that you are in good health and minimal NLD probs.
Get in contact with me, As it would be great to contact someone else who suffers the same.
Take good care.
cyberingone
Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum


Necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum ("NLD") is a rash that occurs on the lower legs. It is more common in women, and there are usually several spots. They are slightly raised shiny red-brown patches. The centers are often yellowish and may develop open sores that are slow to heal. Often a biopsy is needed to diagnose NLD.

NLD usually occurs more often in people with diabetes, in people with a family history of diabetes or a tendency to get diabetes. Still, the exact cause of NLD in not known. A similar condition that is often confused with NLD is granuloma annulare. Similar to the association of NLD and diabetes, it appears that a high percentage of persons with disseminated granuloma annulare have diabetes mellitus. The individual spots typically consist of a circular array of reddish to brown and slightly translucent bumps.

Treatment of NLD is difficult. Sometimes it responds to topical cortisone creams, especially if covered ("occluded") with an airtight dressing. Cortisone injections can also be used to treat NLD. These are more effective than cortisone creams. NLD usually goes through stages of activity and inactivity. One is not able to predict when the condition will flare. Ultraviolet light treatment has been found to control this condition when it is flaring. A baby aspirin each day, and other medications that thin the blood, such as Trental, may help NLD. Other medications, including prednisone pills (steroids) are used in difficult or severe cases.


(I am posting this skin condition since it is the one I have).

I noticed a dime-size red spot on my left ankle when I was 19.
It slowly grew bigger. My Endocrinologist knew exactly what it
was and gave me some Hydrocortisone cream.

At age 25, my 2 yr. old Son accidently drove his big ride-on truck
into my ankle. (That hurt like H*LL! :rolleyes:) Soon after, I had 2-3 ulcers on it. I got some Sulpha cream at the Drs., wrapped my ankle in gauze and the ulcers were gone in about 2 weeks. The spot is now
as big as a baseball although it is skin-coloured and not active. It
doesn't bother me since I can't see it unless I look at it in a mirror,
which I don't. These spots do not hurt or itch(unless of course, someone drives a truck into it :D ).

If you have what sounds like this condition(It is now known as NL,
since it happens to many non-diabetics also), see your Dr. so they
can prescribe a treatment for you. Protect the spot(s) so nothing
hits it accidently.
 

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I have NLD and its driving me bananas. It seems to be on a constant flare up now days. Hospital gave me Nerisone cream and ichtpaste bandage to treat it, which after a few weeks it's ok. Give it another two weeks and its back to being itchy and sore and there is a red inflamed bumpy ring around the exsisting marks. So its then back to the above treatment. Is there anyway of finding out what causes the flare ups or is it something I'll have to live with. I have a large patch travelling down to the side of my calf muscle and a patch on the top of my foot. I would have included pictures but I can't see a link to put them in...Any help would make my life a lot easier...:(

Lynn

PS I also can't get life insurance for it as well. Anybody else have this problem. Oh sorry I can get life insurance BUT they want 35 to 50 pounds a month which is to expensive for me.:eek:
 

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My husband has diabetes and he has been scratching his leg off and on for the past couple of months. Guess I'd better have a look at it to see if that is what is going on with him. I'm glad you posted this, there is so much to learn.
 
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Hi. I've had NL since I was about 13. I have it on both legs. I've been going to a great Dermatologist who is treating them with Photodynamic Therapy using Metvix as a photosensitizer. It's working remarkably well. It has taken about 14 treatments so far, but it's cleared up quite a lot.
<snip>
You can google "NLD with photodynamic therapy".
 

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Thank you for the recommendation, Sunflower. Since you haven't gained enough seniority to post links, I'll just snip out that part of your message. People can always google it. :)

Will you stick around & tell us more about your diabetes & how you manage it? It'd be nice to get better acquainted.
 
G

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Thank you for the recommendation, Sunflower. Since you haven't gained enough seniority to post links, I'll just snip out that part of your message. People can always google it. :)

Will you stick around & tell us more about your diabetes & how you manage it? It'd be nice to get better acquainted.
Hi Shanny,
Unfortunately, I will not be sticking around on a site that deletes information that can help other people. I think it's incredibly rude and unkind of you to remove that link. There was a lot of information on that exact site that was from a "great source" according to my dermatologist. For you to remove information regarding a condition that is difficult to deal with both physically and mentally for those who have it and preventing them from printing it and taking it to their doctor just because I haven't made 5 posts is ridiculous.

Have a nice day and good luck with the site. I am unsubscribing and will post my information where people will be grateful to have it.
 

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It's too bad that you are offended by forum policy, but it goes to show that reading the Terms of Use before you post makes a lot of good sense. We simply do not allow newcomers to start throwing their weight around, making recommendations and posting links. Everyone isn't the paragon of virtue that you are, and there are thousands of spammers getting paid to post deliberately misleading information.


Hi Shanny,
Unfortunately, I will not be sticking around on a site that deletes information that can help other people. I think it's incredibly rude and unkind of you to remove that link. There was a lot of information on that exact site that was from a "great source" according to my dermatologist. For you to remove information regarding a condition that is difficult to deal with both physically and mentally for those who have it and preventing them from printing it and taking it to their doctor just because I haven't made 5 posts is ridiculous.

Have a nice day and good luck with the site. I am unsubscribing and will post my information where people will be grateful to have it.
 

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Nld

I have just been diagnosed with NLD today ..grr..i got one spot that started about 5 years ago and then another that started about 3 years ago. Both are on the same leg. I was misdiagnosed initially and just now got the correct diagnosis. I hate wearing shorts now b/c people r rude and say things like...do u have ringworm, ew. SO RUDE! From reading it seems rare and not much success with treatment. Mine dont actually hurt or itch or anything which i guess is a good thing since so many experience itching and pain. They put me on some cream today which i just have a feeling wont work..
 

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Hi All,

So i have been diabetic for about 20 years now and have spent the last 10 or so with two (formerly 3, but 2 slowly morphed together) very ugly looking patches on my leg. After numerous misdaignoses and failed attempts at resolving the issue, i have finally seen a doctor who has essentially written the book on NLD and has offered up a very complex treatment regimen that he says will eventually get rid of the NLD on my leg. I will indicate what the treatment prescribed is below, but according to the doctor, it may take between 3 and 4 years before its completely gone. The good news is, despite many people suggesting otherwise, it is treatable and its nothing serious and not from any mis-management of diabetes. The key to treatment, according to the doctor is to first turn the color of the outer layer of the NLD "brown", instead of red it is now (I suppose the idea is to essentially contain the NLD first). Once the outer area has browned, the process of treating the inner area will begin. I apologize in advance, but i havent gotten far enough into the treatment to know whether it will continue to treat the inside, or whether new medications will be prescribed. So, here is the current treatment regimen...
1) Trental 3x per day
2) Baby Aspirin 1x per day (which the doctor suggested should be taken by diabetics, with or without NLD)
3) Protopic cream, applied only on the outer edge 1x per day Monday through Friday
4) Clobetasol cream, applied only on the outer edge 2x per day Saturday & Sunday (this is apparently a very strong cream which would cause atrophy if used too often, hence the 2x per week)

Hope that helps...
 
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