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Hi everyone. I was diagnosed with type2 on 3/12/11. My HA1c was 6.7, and my bad cholesterol and triglycerides are up and my good cholesterol is too low, so I need a diet that will solve all these problems. I know fat is important for diabetics, but I don't want a diet where I have to mostly eat cheese, meat or other high fat things. I also want to eat whole grains, but I don't know which ones to eat. I have been eating the way the dietician told me, but my bg keeps going up instead of down.

I bought a couple of diabetic books, but had to wade through a bunch of scientific research and personal experience of the author before I got to the point where every bite you eat has to be weighed and measured. That isn't practical for me, if I have to do that, I know I won't stick with it, but I am willing to count carbs.

Are there any diabetic diets out there where I don't have to weigh and measure everything I eat?
 

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Hi Fortunately - welcome to the forum.

When I was diagnosed a few months ago, my diet was low-fat, high-carb. I ate plenty of whole grains and fruit, in addition to unhealthy things (too much processed food.) I had to change my diet on a dime and the result is showing up my blood sugar numbers. When I have a whole grain or fruit, I do spike rather high so have had to be very careful with when and in what quantity (minimal!) I eat them. Right now it's rare.

From all the reading and being my own lab experiment, I feel strongly that a diet very low in carbs and high in fat is what will make me healthy. It's odd after a lifetime of thinking low-fat was God. My lipids were very bad but I feel confident they will improve with my changed diet.

I don't weight or measure anything - but do count carbs. My best advice would be to figure out how many carbs you are eating at your current sugar levels and reduce them by 10% for a couple/few days and see what impact that has. If it has little, then reduce another 10% until you see a change. That might then be your sweet spot. We're all different.
 
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You're right in thinking there's a diet that would solve your lipids & blood sugar problems - it's a low-carb/high-fat (lc/hf) diet. I would recommend Diabetes Solution by Dr. Richard K. Bernstein, who is diabetic himself.

If you aren't testing, I suggest you get a meter and find out what it takes to keep your blood sugar in a safe range (under 140 at all times). You've laid down a lot of rules about what you'll accept and what you won't; I hope you understand that if you DON'T get your blood sugar down & keep it down, you'll be paying the consequences in complications before too long. This needs to be top priority.

There are very few grains that don't spike blood sugar, and you'll just have to test and find out if there are any that you can tolerate. We do have members who are vegetarians, but that doesn't mean they can use grains, and it doesn't mean they don't use fats . . . fats are of vital importance in lowering cholesterol.

Welcome to DF where you'll get lots of good information & opinions!
 

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I've been dealing with Type 2 since August 2010 and only used the measuring cups/spoons for the first week or so. Most of us really have NO IDEA what a 1/4 cup serving of pasta or oatmeal looks like, or what 1Tbsp. of dressing is. (I gave up the pasta, oatmeal, rice, etc. and don't really miss them.)

Most of us have grown up hearing that fat will kill us. After reading books and articles and hanging out on this forum, I decided to eliminate as many carbs as possible and follow a sorta-Atkins diet. It worked - my BG and all the fat/cholesterol numbers are much better now than when I was first diagnosed. Don't expect overnight improvement, but most people have the same results.

You won't have to spend the rest of your life measuring everything. And your blood numbers will improve even if you eat fat. It is a long learning process but totally worth the work!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You've laid down a lot of rules about what you'll accept and what you won't;
Guess I should have explained. It's not that I'm too lazy to keep track of everything I eat, it isn't practical for me. I travel a lot in my work, often have to grab something to eat on the road at gas stations or fast food drive throughs because I usually have to be a certain place by a certain time. And since I'm away from home so much, I do a lot of eating in restaurants, and only cook at home on most weekends, so it is impossible for me to weigh and measure everything.

We do have members who are vegetarians
I am surprised to hear that vegetarians are able to keep their blood sugar under control since all vegetables have carbs.
 

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Guess I should have explained. It's not that I'm too lazy to keep track of everything I eat, it isn't practical for me. I travel a lot in my work, often have to grab something to eat on the road at gas stations or fast food drive throughs because I usually have to be a certain place by a certain time. And since I'm away from home so much, I do a lot of eating in restaurants, and only cook at home on most weekends, so it is impossible for me to weigh and measure everything.
That was before. This is now, and NOW you are diabetic.

Don't get hung up on the weighing/measuring. You want a diet that will treat both your high lipids & high blood glucose. High-fat/low-carb will do that - it's been proven right here among our own members. But when you say you don't want to eat high fat and you DO want to continue eating grains, it waves a red flag . . .

Many of us eat out (http://www.diabetesforum.com/diabetes-diet-nutrition/5073-restaurant-rant-2.html#post37860) & have found that wait staff & kitchen staff are more than happy to accommodate special diets. All you have to do is ask them to make substitutions for the potatoes/pilaf/rice/pasta, and please hold the bread.

When you use fast food driveup, take some advice from here, especially the three main rules.

(and yes, all vegetables have carbs, but there is a dramatic difference in the effect of good high-fiber vegetables like asparagus/artichokes/spinach/cabbage/kale/etc., and starchy fast-acting vegetables like cereal grains/potatoes/corn/etc.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
But when you say you don't want to eat high fat and you DO want to continue eating grains, it waves a red flag . . .
I don't understand why that would raise a red flag, whole grains are supposed to be healthy for people, and that is what my dietician told me to eat. But I don't know anything about whole grain and was asking which ones a diabetic can eat without raising bg too much. Are you saying I shouldn't eat any grain at all?
 

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Shanny is right. That was then, this is now.

Now that you are sick, the game has changed, suck it up and get used to it, the alternative isn't so pretty.
 
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I don't understand why that would raise a red flag, whole grains are supposed to be healthy for people, and that is what my dietician told me to eat. But I don't know anything about whole grain and was asking which ones a diabetic can eat without raising bg too much. Are you saying I shouldn't eat any grain at all?
What is healthy and "good" for healthy people doesn't apply to those of us that are not healthy
 

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I'd say its a safe bet that your dietitian does not have diabetes, learned all they know from a book, therefore doesn't know whats best for a diabetic
 

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I don't understand why that would raise a red flag, whole grains are supposed to be healthy for people, and that is what my dietician told me to eat. But I don't know anything about whole grain and was asking which ones a diabetic can eat without raising bg too much. Are you saying I shouldn't eat any grain at all?
Yes, that's what I'm saying - many of us find we cannot eat grains at all. And here's another news flash: we often cannot eat fruit either. What the doctors/dietitians/diabetes educators of the world prescribe is the standard "healthy" diet for non-diabetic people. It is NOT healthy for diabetics. Your mission is to get to work with a meter and start testing everything you eat. If you eat a slice of garlic bread and test one hour after your first bite, you want your BGL to be under 140. Test again two hours after that first bite, and if it's still under 140 & dropping lower, you may be able to eat one slice of bread now & then as long as there are no other carbs in the meal. But if it's OVER 140, then garlic bread needs to be eliminated from your regular diet. Do this test with all the foods you normally eat, and anything that bumps your blood sugar over 140 should be avoided.
 

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I just want to add my 2c here as well...

I was given the news of my TypeII diabetes officially on January 4th, though I was told "probably" on Dec 19th.

My dietitian, like almost all dietitians and nutritionists out there also gave me the same advice: low-fat/whole-grains, etc., etc., which turned out to be ABSOLUTELY WRONG for me, as well as it is for most diabetics.

The research has shown for years that it's the high-carb/low-fat diets that cause obesity, insulin-resistance, metabolic syndrome, etc., but neither the U.S. nor Canadian governments have changed their stance on fat and grains in the diet. (Likely because changing their stance would be admitting to being wrong, and actually causing the 'obesity epidemic' they rant about...)

I lowered my blood sugars by exercising, losing weight, and eating low-carb. I don't really eat high-fat either, I balance it out pretty well.

Most of my carbs come from veggies (no potatoes, corn or parsnips), and a very little bit of fruit (mostly berries.) I will eat sprouted-grain bread, but that's the only bread I regularly eat. I do allow myself the occasional (very occasional) treat meal, but I workout excessively both before and after the meal to regulate my BG's. I do not eat any other grains/cereals/rice, etc.

When eating out I usually get a bacon cheeseburger, no ketchup, and toss the bun (or order without the bun, although I do get some odd looks when doing so...). Or I hit a pancake house and get good old bacon and eggs. I rarely, if ever, drink juice of any kind (just too much sugars). I do drink diet sodas, but ONLY with my meal... any other time I'm thirsty, it's WATER. (Some people don't have issues with diet pop other times, but I do. I find that when I drink a diet pop other than mealtime, that I end up hungry - It appears I get a bit of an insulin response simply to the sweetness of it, so it's best for me to have it with my meals. I do the same with desserts, even sugar-free ones, I have them only with my meals, and immediately.)

My favorite dessert for no-rise in my BG's is sugar-free jello (the pre-packaged kind) with real homemade whipped cream. There's also a few good recipes on this site that I like too.

When on the go I keep snacks of peanuts, almonds, walnuts and pecans. (watch for sugars in pre-packaged ones). These heart-healthy nuts are slow-digesting, and provide heart-healthy oils that help with your cholesterol levels.

Don't be afraid of fats, just avoid TRANS fats. Coconut oil is great for cooking in. So is olive oil. I have a selection of oils now depending on what I'm cooking: Butter, Olive Oil, Palm Oil, Peanut Oil and Sesame Oils are all in my pantry, and I use them regularly.

You're lucky in that your A1c is already reasonable... Mine was over 12% at diagnosis... You should find that reducing your starchy carbs, eating healthy fats and proteins and non-starchy veggies will REALLY help your BG's, as will daily exercise.

Good luck, and welcome to the site!
 
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The diabetes diet that most doctors and dieticians give you is very high in carbs and will keep your bgs much higher than normal. No one knows where complications start so as far as I am concerned I am not going to take a chance. A non diabetic has bgs from 70-100 most of the day, and that is where I want to be. The diet or lifestyle way of eating is low carb. I love whole grains but rarely eat them because they do spike me. Sometimes I can get away with a slice of Eziekel bread if my fasting bg is in the 80's. I make all my my own snacks at home using flaxseed, almond meal and Coconut Oil. These cookies, muffins and desserts rarely spike my bgs. Eating low carb doesn't have to be hard, but it does take a little extra time at restaurants. A book like Calorie King is great. Also most chain restaurant have nutrition facts online, so you can decide what you will eat ahead of time. Basically eggs, cheese, meat, most vegetables are safe. What you need to watch out for is added sweetners in salad dressings and sauces, breading on chicken, and pastas, potatoes and rice. Lots of time when I eat out, I order off the menu. If there is nothing low carb I will ask if I can have a grilled chicken, steak or shrimp with salad with oil and vinegr on the side . If there is a potato or rice I ask for extra veggies . If there is bread on the table push it to the other side or ask them to take it away. When you start to see great low bgs, you will stick with this WOE ( way of eating)
 
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Hi everyone. I was diagnosed with type2 on 3/12/11. My HA1c was 6.7, and my bad cholesterol and triglycerides are up and my good cholesterol is too low, so I need a diet that will solve all these problems. I know fat is important for diabetics, but I don't want a diet where I have to mostly eat cheese, meat or other high fat things. I also want to eat whole grains, but I don't know which ones to eat. I have been eating the way the dietician told me, but my bg keeps going up instead of down.

I bought a couple of diabetic books, but had to wade through a bunch of scientific research and personal experience of the author before I got to the point where every bite you eat has to be weighed and measured. That isn't practical for me, if I have to do that, I know I won't stick with it, but I am willing to count carbs.

Are there any diabetic diets out there where I don't have to weigh and measure everything I eat?
I find that counting carbs is the best diet for diabetics. I am on insulin so I am able to enjoy more carbs on a daily basis. I also know what foods that I can eat that don't raise your blood sugar. I love eggs and string cheese.
 
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I think many people don't understand the use of fat in a diet. If you eat fat and carbs together, you will gain weight and your bgs will go up. When you limit carbs to the bare minimum and eat fat then you lose weight and bgs go down. So if you eat bread and butter it is not the butter that is making you fat but the combo. Most junk foods are a combination of high carbs and fat to make them taste good. Usually to stay in "Ketosis" you need to be below 70 carbs or less per day.
 

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I also wanted to say that although it's impractical at times to weigh and/or measure things, it's a good habit to do when you can, just so you can see what a serving size looks like, and what you should strive for.

Let's be honest, you only need to weigh a chicken breast a couple of times to learn by sight if it's a 3oz or 4oz chicken breast... The same goes for knowing how much 1/3c of nuts is... once you've measured a few times, it becomes pretty innate knowledge.
 
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