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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone!

Just need your help, ideas and advises.

I just had my results today from the hospital:

GLUCOSE - 118 mg/dl ref. range = 76 - 110 mg/dl
SGPT/ALT - 48.00 U/L ref. range = 5.0 - 50
CREATININE - 1.15 mg/dl ref. range = .60 - 1.50

GLUCOSE (2HrPP) - 118.42 mg/dl

GLYCOSYLATED HGB - 5.9 ref. range = 4.3 - 6.1

The DOCTOR RULED ME OUT AS DIABETIC, though with impaired glucose tolerance. The doctor did not prescribe any medication yet suggested a lipid profile and stress test which I will be taking tomorrow since we discussed some other things.

I also asked the doctor referral for a dietrician for a Diabetic Diet and hereunder are the data

I am 39 yrs. old, weights: 73.8 kg., height: 172 cm., BMI: 25, RDW: 68

She prescribed me 2,000 calories, CHO: 250g, CHON: 150g, fats 67g

BREAKFAST 7:00 A.M.
MEAL SERVINGS HOUSEHOLD SIZES
Rice 2 1 cup
Meat 3 3 matchbox sizes
Fruit 1 varies
Fat 2.5 2 1/2 TSP.
Milk 1/2 2 TBSP.

SNACKS 1 varies
Rice Subs. (9:00 a.m.)

LUNCH 12:00 NN
MEAL SERVINGS HOUSEHOLD SIZES
Vegetable 2 1 cup
Rice 3 1 1/2 cup
Meat 3 3 matchbox sizes
Fruit 1 varies
Fat 2.5 2 1/2 TSP.

SNACKS rice subs 1 varies
(3:00 p.m.)milk 1/2 2 TBSP.

DINNER 6:00 P.M.
MEAL SERVINGS HOUSEHOLD SIZES
Vegetable 2 1 cup
Rice 2 1 cup
Meat 3 3 matchbox sizes
Fruit 1 varies
Fat 2.5 2 1/2 TSP.

She said that all of the above are what we all need to get all the necessary nutrients to support our daily body function.

QUERIES:

1) Need some opinions, did the Doctor diagnosed me right?
2) Is there nothing wrong with my Diet Prescription?
3) Any advice I need to know?

Thank you and may God bless us all!
 

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considering that its carbohydrates that body converts to glucose which cause the pancreas to produce insulin and being "impaired glucose tolerance" means your pancreas is having a hard time keeping up with sudden high levels of glucose. Eating 8 1/2 cups of rice a day is putting quite a load of glucose in your system.

JMO
 

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Those of us who are insulin resistant or glucose impaired need to cut way back on our carbs at meals. This is a concept that most dieticians don't like. Eating 250 carbs per day will surely put you on the path to full blown diabetes pretty quick. For a point of reference I am a full blown type 2 and eat aroun 30-50 carbs most days. My latest HbA1c was 5.3. Normal non diabetics with a functioning pancreas have an HbA1c from 4-5.5. So you are definitely pre diabetic which is the early stages of diabetes. Do you have a home bg meter? You should be testing when you wake up and 2 hours after meals. When you wake up diabetics want to be under 100 and after meals 120-140 or lower.
 

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250 carbs a day, wow that is a lot in my opinion. I do agree that you need to eat well so your body gets enough nutrients, but I would think even as a pre-diabetic that you could cut that number in half and be fine. And then choose your carbs wisely. Whole grains, and stuff like that. As a T2 diabetic I consume under 60 carbs a day and do fairly well.
If you can reduce the stress on your pancreas by managing your diet then do that. This is always a better option then needing medication.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you all.... I do am in favor to your comments, I do eat rice again but just a cup every meal... still have to check my glucose level.

The dietician mentioned that if I'll only eat protein or others and no carbohydrates, I could lose my energy... have anyone experienced this?

Please comment... (and for those who hasn't commented yet, please feel free... I'm still confused)

Thank you.
 

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Thank you all.... I do am in favor to your comments, I do eat rice again but just a cup every meal... still have to check my glucose level.

The dietician mentioned that if I'll only eat protein or others and no carbohydrates, I could lose my energy... have anyone experienced this?

Please comment... (and for those who hasn't commented yet, please feel free... I'm still confused)

Thank you.
When you first get started on low-carb, you may encounter a temporary unpleasantness known as "Atkins flu." It lasts, they say, 2-3 days. For me, more like a little over a week.

I try to go very low, but still eat leafy green veggies -- fresh, frozen, cooked or raw. Nuts were a problem, but walnuts/pecans/macadamias/brazils work pretty well (and are more expensive than most -- wouldn't ya know it!).
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks too Shalynne...

I have started eating based on Glycemic Index and I am planning to stick on it... is it okay that I'll take vitamins? or a multi-vitamins in capsules? Does anyone have a bad experience on it?

@jwags: what are those 30-50 carbs you consume most days?
@tgreen: what are those under 60 grams you consume in a day?

Thanks.
 

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Hello everyone!

Just need your help, ideas and advises.

I just had my results today from the hospital:

GLUCOSE - 118 mg/dl ref. range = 76 - 110 mg/dl
SGPT/ALT - 48.00 U/L ref. range = 5.0 - 50
CREATININE - 1.15 mg/dl ref. range = .60 - 1.50

GLUCOSE (2HrPP) - 118.42 mg/dl

GLYCOSYLATED HGB - 5.9 ref. range = 4.3 - 6.1

The DOCTOR RULED ME OUT AS DIABETIC, though with impaired glucose tolerance. The doctor did not prescribe any medication yet suggested a lipid profile and stress test which I will be taking tomorrow since we discussed some other things.

I also asked the doctor referral for a dietrician for a Diabetic Diet and hereunder are the data

I am 39 yrs. old, weights: 73.8 kg., height: 172 cm., BMI: 25, RDW: 68

She prescribed me 2,000 calories, CHO: 250g, CHON: 150g, fats 67g

BREAKFAST 7:00 A.M.
MEAL SERVINGS HOUSEHOLD SIZES
Rice 2 1 cup
Meat 3 3 matchbox sizes
Fruit 1 varies
Fat 2.5 2 1/2 TSP.
Milk 1/2 2 TBSP.

SNACKS 1 varies
Rice Subs. (9:00 a.m.)

LUNCH 12:00 NN
MEAL SERVINGS HOUSEHOLD SIZES
Vegetable 2 1 cup
Rice 3 1 1/2 cup
Meat 3 3 matchbox sizes
Fruit 1 varies
Fat 2.5 2 1/2 TSP.

SNACKS rice subs 1 varies
(3:00 p.m.)milk 1/2 2 TBSP.

DINNER 6:00 P.M.
MEAL SERVINGS HOUSEHOLD SIZES
Vegetable 2 1 cup
Rice 2 1 cup
Meat 3 3 matchbox sizes
Fruit 1 varies
Fat 2.5 2 1/2 TSP.

She said that all of the above are what we all need to get all the necessary nutrients to support our daily body function.

QUERIES:

1) Need some opinions, did the Doctor diagnosed me right?
2) Is there nothing wrong with my Diet Prescription?
3) Any advice I need to know?

Thank you and may God bless us all!
You are within normal BMI range but rice has a high GI which means it peaks quickly (raises BGL's) but drops quickly as well, whereas low GI foods are more stablised, working over a number of hours and don't spike blood sugars.

I would halve carbs but depends on amount of exercise and type of work you do. Diet and exercise is a preferable treatment than medication and I know Type 2 diabetics who have controlled their diabetes with diet/exercise for years without needing meds.

Being pre diabetic/insulin resistance doesn't mean you will be come a type 2 diabetic requiring medication. Is there a history of diabetes in your family?

I am on 200 carbs a day but have a high metabolism rate and run a large farm so I burn the carbs up. Most people here who are Type 2 are on a low carb diet , and this is the norm with Type 2 diabetics in Australia. Hope this helps.:cool:

Was glucose a overnight fasting test with a duration of 8 to 10 hours?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You are within normal BMI range but rice has a high GI which means it peaks quickly (raises BGL's) but drops quickly as well, whereas low GI foods are more stablised, working over a number of hours and don't spike blood sugars.

I would halve carbs but depends on amount of exercise and type of work you do. Diet and exercise is a preferable treatment than medication and I know Type 2 diabetics who have controlled their diabetes with diet/exercise for years without needing meds.

Being pre diabetic/insulin resistance doesn't mean you will be come a type 2 diabetic requiring medication. Is there a history of diabetes in your family?

I am on 200 carbs a day but have a high metabolism rate and run a large farm so I burn the carbs up. Most people here who are Type 2 are on a low carb diet , and this is the norm with Type 2 diabetics in Australia. Hope this helps.:cool:

Was glucose a overnight fasting test with a duration of 8 to 10 hours?
Thanks Horsewhisperer!

As for a family history on diabetes, I think, I cannot pinpoint who... there's none that I know....

As for the carbs, the dietician told me that carbohydrates particularly in rice if controlled or in moderation... the spike will not be that high resulting to stability...

Yup! the glucose was, I think, 9 hours... and the meal I had for the glucose taken after 2 hours were fish and vegetables...

More power to you Horsewhisperer!!!
 

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i watch the carbs i eat very closely. and i try to avoid eating the white stuff. wheat, flour, rice, and any thing made with them. i get my carbs from some fruits and other veggies.
eating a no carb diet is not healthy, buecause the body needs some carbs. i just try to keep them to a moderate amount.
i small portion of rice, or a small dinner roll will raise my BG by 50pts so i avoid them all together. someone on here told me to eat to your meter. and i do. when i try something new i check my BG several times to see how my body reacts. if you do the same you will see how the starchy and flour foods will make you jump on BG
 

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I would first recommend that you get a glucometer and test and see what the rice does to your blood sugar. If 1 cup spikes you over 140, then try 1/2 a cup.

With the fruit, try to make choices are are lower on the glycemic index so that they do not spike you as high.

Again, the best way to see how certain foods affect you are to test with a glucometer. It is different for everyone... I can eat potatoes, others can't. I can't eat processed corn, others can.

If you are not careful with your blood sugar, it could eventually develop into diabetes. I've been insulin resistant since my teens, but didn't take care of myself - like most college students - and was diagnosed with Type 2 last year. However, at the moment I am controlling it with diet only.

Test test test. That's the best advice I have!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
i watch the carbs i eat very closely. and i try to avoid eating the white stuff. wheat, flour, rice, and any thing made with them. i get my carbs from some fruits and other veggies.
eating a no carb diet is not healthy, buecause the body needs some carbs. i just try to keep them to a moderate amount.
i small portion of rice, or a small dinner roll will raise my BG by 50pts so i avoid them all together. someone on here told me to eat to your meter. and i do. when i try something new i check my BG several times to see how my body reacts. if you do the same you will see how the starchy and flour foods will make you jump on BG
Thank you tgreen!

I'm still having a hardtime now finding carbs that I could eat that would replace rice... do you have any suggestions? so that I can test it...

What's the best and effective time to test after eating something with the glucometer?

Is it okay to eat lots (I mean tons) of low glycemic foods until famished without having spikes?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I would first recommend that you get a glucometer and test and see what the rice does to your blood sugar. If 1 cup spikes you over 140, then try 1/2 a cup.

With the fruit, try to make choices are are lower on the glycemic index so that they do not spike you as high.

Again, the best way to see how certain foods affect you are to test with a glucometer. It is different for everyone... I can eat potatoes, others can't. I can't eat processed corn, others can.

If you are not careful with your blood sugar, it could eventually develop into diabetes. I've been insulin resistant since my teens, but didn't take care of myself - like most college students - and was diagnosed with Type 2 last year. However, at the moment I am controlling it with diet only.

Test test test. That's the best advice I have!
Thanks a lot wdmama!

I also appreciate your advice similar with others... mind you if I'll ask questions similar with what I asked tgreen?

1) Any particular carb names that you have in replacement of rice? How many do you eat on those vegetables with carbs you mentioned?

2) What's the best and effective time to test after eating something with the glucometer?

3) Is it okay to eat lots (I mean tons) of low glycemic foods until famished without having spikes? Or there is still limit to eat. (I'm just concerned because I'll be out of stripes sooner and could buy maybe in a couple of days)
 

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No problem - that's what we're here for :)

1) Any particular carb names that you have in replacement of rice? How many do you eat on those vegetables with carbs you mentioned?
Cauliflower is a good replacement for rice, you can steam it and shred it up so it has a similar texture. You can also leave it in bigger chunks if the texture doesn't matter...we often serve stir fry over it. It soak up the sauce nicely. Spaghetti squash might work as well if you have access to those. For the cauliflower and squash I usually have around 1 cup. You could also just use lots of mixed veggies - whatever you have available.

2) What's the best and effective time to test after eating something with the glucometer?
Standard testing times are one and two hour. Everyone spikes differently - some sooner, some later - so you'd have to test a lot at first to see what you do. If test strips aren't an issue I'd add one in at 90 minutes too. If they are, then I'd say, just check your fasting, and then one hour after every meal and that should give you a decent idea of what's going on. Normal, non-diabetic people rarely go over 120 at all, and research had shown cell damage occurs over 140. We each have our own goals, so you have to decide what level of control you'd be comfortable with. One fellow here keeps his numbers below 100 at all time, others are okay with higher numbers - I have a friend who thinks he's okay as long as he's around 180.

3) Is it okay to eat lots (I mean tons) of low glycemic foods until famished without having spikes? Or there is still limit to eat. (I'm just concerned because I'll be out of stripes sooner and could buy maybe in a couple of days)
It depends. I know that's not an easy answer, but it depends on the food, the amount (what does a "ton" mean to you?), and your body. I eat several cups of leafy greens every day and don't have a problem. But things like berries, even though I can eat probably 1 cup and stay within my limit, if I pigged out on 4 lbs of them, I'd definitely spike. I think most people would. Portion control is very important, especially with any foods that contain more than minimal carbohydrates. Greens and celery might be the only "unlimited" foods I could get away with, but you may be different.

Hope that helps a bit!
 
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Discussion Starter #15
No problem - that's what we're here for :)



Cauliflower is a good replacement for rice, you can steam it and shred it up so it has a similar texture. You can also leave it in bigger chunks if the texture doesn't matter...we often serve stir fry over it. It soak up the sauce nicely. Spaghetti squash might work as well if you have access to those. For the cauliflower and squash I usually have around 1 cup. You could also just use lots of mixed veggies - whatever you have available.
Thanks for the tips wdmama... at least you helped me save time on research. It's such a great help.



Standard testing times are one and two hour. Everyone spikes differently - some sooner, some later - so you'd have to test a lot at first to see what you do. If test strips aren't an issue I'd add one in at 90 minutes too. If they are, then I'd say, just check your fasting, and then one hour after every meal and that should give you a decent idea of what's going on. Normal, non-diabetic people rarely go over 120 at all, and research had shown cell damage occurs over 140. We each have our own goals, so you have to decide what level of control you'd be comfortable with. One fellow here keeps his numbers below 100 at all time, others are okay with higher numbers - I have a friend who thinks he's okay as long as he's around 180.
Thanks also for this. I've been short with the strips because I've tested my friends just to know if they are unaware diabetics. Thanks also for the tips, at least I have some guide to refer into...



It depends. I know that's not an easy answer, but it depends on the food, the amount (what does a "ton" mean to you?), and your body. I eat several cups of leafy greens every day and don't have a problem. But things like berries, even though I can eat probably 1 cup and stay within my limit, if I pigged out on 4 lbs of them, I'd definitely spike. I think most people would. Portion control is very important, especially with any foods that contain more than minimal carbohydrates. Greens and celery might be the only "unlimited" foods I could get away with, but you may be different.

Hope that helps a bit!
Thanks also for this, at least I had a hunch that jives with your explanation. I'm just new with the GI diet aspect... and I haven't find time and enough access on Glycemic Loads, but sooner or later, I will.

Just had in mind... that if it's hunger that we're feeding, there'll be a point in time that we can compare lots of vegetables eaten against a small portion of carbohydrates food that directly ease the hunger whichever has lower effect on the glucose spike.

Once again, thanks a lot wdmama... God bless!!!
 

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Listen, as a new diabetic, the hunger with cutting carbs can be quite intense, but trust me, a t2 since Xmas, the hunger fades as the addiction to carbs leaves your body. I usually use nuts, no peanuts, to fill the gaps between meals. It does get easier and for u being here and asking all the right questions you will get where u need to be

Keep it up

Sent from my iPod touch using Diabetes
 

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You're getting very good advice, Zlachirk, and I just want to say it DOES get easier. As you've been assured by others, the hunger & cravings will subside as you reduce the carbs in your diet. As long as you let your meter be your guide, you're on the right road. Even if the glycemic index says something is safe to eat, if your METER jumps up past 7.7, you know it isn't safe for YOU to eat. Rice in your country is about like potatoes in mine - comes with every meal. We really have to make up our minds that some of those foods have to be limited to maintain good health, and then get on with LIMITING them! :eek: Keep up the good work!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Listen, as a new diabetic, the hunger with cutting carbs can be quite intense, but trust me, a t2 since Xmas, the hunger fades as the addiction to carbs leaves your body. I usually use nuts, no peanuts, to fill the gaps between meals. It does get easier and for u being here and asking all the right questions you will get where u need to be

Keep it up

Sent from my iPod touch using Diabetes
Thanks a lot AcadianFurry!

Do you mind if I ask further?

1. Is there some problem with peanuts? (The GI is 15) Since I just had a cup of fried peanuts earlier.

2. I'm still confused on how to meet my carbohydrates requirements as to what my dietician required me daily per my BMI. I am allowed to have 250g of carbs/day.

The question would be: "What will happen to my body if I cannot consume the required grams of carbs daily?"

Thanks in advance for those who are open to enlighten...
 

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The question would be: "What will happen to my body if I cannot consume the required grams of carbs daily?"
You'll get much faster results controlling your blood sugar, and that's the honest-to-god truth.

The limit set by the medical professionals is about 200g too high. If you can't eat it all, then your body will be much more able to resist the damage that diabetes can cause. All in all, the fewer carbs you can live on, the better your chances for escaping the horrible complications of diabetes.
 

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You'll get much faster results controlling your blood sugar, and that's the honest-to-god truth.

The limit set by the medical professionals is about 200g too high. If you can't eat it all, then your body will be much more able to resist the damage that diabetes can cause. All in all, the fewer carbs you can live on, the better your chances for escaping the horrible complications of diabetes.
Thanks a lot Shanny, at least I have now a clearer picture...

Thank you all once again for the great inputs!!! God bless us all!!!
 
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