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Okay, I am not a big wine drinker and don't know much about but do enjoy a good glass of red wine. My favorite has always been Pinot Noir. Is there any type I should try to avoid? Any recommendations?
 

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Stay with the dry reds, and then go for what you like. I like Itialian reds, and recently found a dry sturdy red from Sicily. Good!! Good price too. Avoid sweet reds with a high sugar content. Also like a Tuscan dry red, with an light fruity flavor, and just a couple dollars more. I like the Portugese dry reds, but they are hard to find except in major metro. areas.

Earle
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Stay with the dry reds, and then go for what you like. I like Itialian reds, and recently found a dry sturdy red from Sicily. Good!! Good price too. Avoid sweet reds with a high sugar content. Also like a Tuscan dry red, with an light fruity flavor, and just a couple dollars more. I like the Portugese dry reds, but they are hard to find except in major metro. areas.

Earle
How can I tell the difference between a dry and a sweet red wine?

Clueless in Alabama (former beer drinker turned wine drinker due to stupid diabetes).
 

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Most reds are generally dry wines although you are opening up a huge can of worms if you jump into the world of wine and nuances and minutiae of wine classification.

Some dry reds will at first appear sweet to you as you develop your wine palette but are really just "jammy or fruit forward". Examples here would be Rhonish reds, Beaujolais, Zinfindels (not white zin) and even Chiantis. Be careful however as there can be huge disparities across wine producers and regions. Some may be off-dry but will likely never be considered a sweet wine.

Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot (both Boudreaux grapes), Pinot Noir (Burgundy), Syrah/Shiraz and Grenache (Rhone) should all be good choices. USA, australia and south america wineries bottle by grape name, whereas France and Italy have wines codified by Region stated as its DOC or DO.

I don't know much about sweet wines (& not because of my diabetes but wine nob berry :). ) but "ice wine" late harvest zins, white zin, white merlot, white Grenache and Muscats are all sweet wines.

Can anyone tell I like my wine? Maybe a little too much for a diabetic.
 

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I would stay away from Boone's Farm Strawberry Hill. Drank 4 fifths of it at a drive-in theater...still can't stand the smell of wine to this day.
 
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How can I tell the difference between a dry and a sweet red wine?

Clueless in Alabama (former beer drinker turned wine drinker due to stupid diabetes).
Switch to Bourbon; no carbs, no sugar and it makes me absolutely brilliant.
 

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jennibee said:
:lol: I think everyone should stay away from Boone's unless they are still in high school!
How did you know?? You weren't my date that night were you? I don't remember. Those were the days LOL2
 

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Okay, I am not a big wine drinker and don't know much about but do enjoy a good glass of red wine. My favorite has always been Pinot Noir. Is there any type I should try to avoid? Any recommendations?
My food guru (aka the OH) tells me that tests have been conducted that suggest that Cabernet Sauvignon contributes something special to diabetics and for that reason we usually favour red Bordeaux.
However, after a full year of experiments, Judy is less convinced, so as long as you stay away from sweet reds (if you can find one) or Port, you should be fine. A nice Pinot Noir is also very tasty.
John
 
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