The Diabetes Forum Support Community For Diabetics Online banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
1,445 Posts
Hi, I am a 30 year old female that has been a diabetic (juvenile) for about 25 years. I recently went to my doctor for a general visit and they decided to do a nerve test (my first one). The results were I had mild neuropathy (I don't have any pain b)my doc did not make a big deal about it (one of the reason I think that he didn't make a big deal is that my hemoglobin a1c is always under 6). He just said it is common for someone who had diabetes for so long to have mild neuropathy. What is your take on it? Does anyone have diabetes for that long and not have neuropathy? Is it common/normal? Please help me give me advice this really really bothers me..
Hi Laya,

Welcome to the Forum. I'll let the other very experienced Type 1 and Type 2s answer this question, but I wanted to know that though your HbA1c has always been below 6 how stable have your blood sugars been (in terms of variations lows and highs) ?

I ask this because I've read again and again that by very tightly controlling the deviation from the average a lot of these issues can be reversed..

There are many long term T1s here who should be coming online soon...

Tony


.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,445 Posts
I do have deviation some days more than others--are you trying to say if I get even tighter control it can reverse the neuropathy?
My experience with Diabetes is extremely limited but yes several people here have stated that strong control (tighter) can help stall the progression and even reverse the effects. Dr Bernstein who has had 65 years of T1 diabetes also says the same in his book (Which I think you should get a copy of)

A tight control would ideally mean a HbA1c of significantly below 6 but more importantly no wild swings. Never over 140, lower then better. No Hypos either.

T1 is a different disease to what I have (T2) and I may not fully appreciate the differences and difficulties in maintaining that kind of control but essentially that's the idea


Tony
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,445 Posts
Are you already counting carbs and limiting them ? I am sure you would be

But If not that can be an efficient approach of reducing your insulin requirements. Less carbs can also mean lesser spikes and less insulin means low chances of severe hypos. Its called the "Law of small numbers"
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top