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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My husband was diagnosed yesterday-31 years old. He is not overweight and very active, but eats a lot of carbs...not sure if it is Type 1 or 2.

His blood glucose was 420 and they said it has been that way for over 6 weeks and that we are lucky he is alive. They put him on 5 shots a day.

I am on here trying to learn something, anything to make this easier. We are in shock right now. Spending $600 on insulin and needles yesterday didn't help.

I just want to cry. We didn't have much money to begin with and I am not sure how we are going to do this...not to mention just the process he is going to have to go through daily.


Just really sad :( and scared
 

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I'm so sorry you guys were thrown into this. Unfortunately, for a lot of people there are just no symptoms until things get really dangerous.

Take a deep breath. Now you know and you can tackle this beast head on.

Walmart carries a glucometer for $9, ReliOn, and the strips are inexpensive. I have really good insurance, but the Walmart strips are cheaper than what I have to pay through my insurance, so I use those.

So, if your test strips are too expensive, that is something to consider.

Next, he's got to change his way of eating. Cut the carbs, load up on veggies, protein, and fats. Check out low carb or primal diets and recipes. It can be hard to give up the carbs at first, but you can eat some truly delicious meals on this plan and my husband and I don't feel deprived AT ALL. But, I love to cook, so it's always exciting to try new recipes and make some delicious meals.

There's lots of substitutions you can use - cauliflower for rice or potatoes, zucchini for noodles, lettuce for taco shells/tortillas/buns.

He needs to eat to his meter... eat and test and eat and test. What we can or can't eat can vary from person to person - so that's the only way to find out what works and what doesn't. With his level of activity, he may be able to eat more carbs, just not as much as he was eating before.

Welcome to the forums! It's not a place anyone wants to be, and it is a huge blow when you get an unexpected diagnosis. We're here to support you both, however we can!
 

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Welcome to you both. It is daunting and overwhelming at first but you are now among friends who know what it feels like and many here who have come through the early stages OK. It does get easier :)

All great advice already from wdmama.

Please stay around, read, share and ask questions.
 

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Welcome to the forum - glad you're here, sorry you have to be.

Once your husband gets his blood sugar in control - the greatest drop will come from a change in his diet - he will most likely not need as much insulin which will reduce your costs. He also will begin to feel better, with more energy, once his glucose stabilizes in a normal range. At least that's something in all this bad news to look forward to...

Hang tight. You guys will get through it. This is a tremendous group for information and support.
 

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As Moon indicated, Welcome to the forum - but sorry you had to find us!
I was diagnosed in 1998 and am quite a bit older, if one keeps the BG in/near the recommended levels we for the most part won't have the complications associated with diabetes. Of course if one ignores managing the disease then you can expect problems. I have had no serious problems since my diagnosis in 1998.

Here is a link to MUCH better priced Insulin - just be sure using it is OK per your Doctor ReliOn | Diabetes Products Insulin types are different and not necessarily interchangeable.
WalMart also has better priced syringes for the shots, unless he is using an Insulin Pen and they have needles for those also.

As his BG lowers closer to normal keep watch for the "hypo" or very low Blood Glucose, it does get serious very quickly.

Lowering the carbs in his diet will be a major turning point for control of the blood glucose! Lowering carbs DOES NOT mean he needs to be hungry at all.
Check this forum and Blood Sugar 101 for lots of good ideas on foods that do work to help keep the BG down!
Please do post and let us know how it's going!
 

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Welcome and hang in there

My husband was diagnosed yesterday-31 years old. He is not overweight and very active, but eats a lot of carbs...not sure if it is Type 1 or 2.

His blood glucose was 420 and they said it has been that way for over 6 weeks and that we are lucky he is alive. They put him on 5 shots a day.

I am on here trying to learn something, anything to make this easier. We are in shock right now. Spending $600 on insulin and needles yesterday didn't help.

I just want to cry. We didn't have much money to begin with and I am not sure how we are going to do this...not to mention just the process he is going to have to go through daily.


Just really sad :( and scared
Hi and welcome to the site. Although hard to do, try to take a breath and relax. You and your husband are not alone. Many here will be able to come up with ideas and suggestions that will surly help.
The financial end is never easy-especially when it's something serious and unexpected.

Please keep reading in the site as much as you can and keep us posted as you go along.

Mabuhay from the Philippines

Gene...
 

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(((Pastaplz))) I hope you're less sad & scared for having found us - it's so intimidating facing a threat like this alone, and now you are NOT alone anymore. One step at a time is all any of us can do, and we're here to help you as much as we can.

Has his doctor run the tests to determine if he's type 1? Because it sounds a lot like type 1 or type 1.5 . . .

Take heed of all the good advice offered here - you won't be sorry. These good folk are the ones who have faced the threat themselves & can help you find the way through the jungle.

Take care and do visit us often.
 

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You will find that if he is type 1 that carbs are not the enemy. It is just a complex system of counting them, dosing for them, and timing when to take those shots. It will take some time to get it perfect. I have been working on it for 40 years and still don't get it right all the time. Don't worry about the little things and everything is a little thing. He is going to be allright.
 

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Welcome pastaplz... I'm also new here. Just linger and don't refrain from asking questions... ideas are overflowing here... may God bless your husband and your family...
 

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You will find that if he is type 1 that carbs are not the enemy. It is just a complex system of counting them, dosing for them, and timing when to take those shots. It will take some time to get it perfect. I have been working on it for 40 years and still don't get it right all the time. Don't worry about the little things and everything is a little thing. He is going to be allright.
:rofl:Yes even a ex DE can't get it right all the time either:eek: There is a wealth of information here by people who live with diabetes 24/7 and some of them 40 or more years. Now if you move Down Under you'd save a packet on diabetic care but our food is twice as expensive about as helpful as I can get with costs involved but look into where you can get cheaper products as some have listed here. Remember to look after yourself to not just hubby:D BIG HUGZ
 

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Hey, I only joined this forum a couple of days ago and have found it very helpful and the people very supportive. I have been diabetic for 36 years and I am still kicking. It can be very overwhellming sometimes, but find a Medical Team that you feel comfortable with is a really good place to start. Ask as many questions as you can and don't think any question is silly. Diabetes will impact all parts of your life. You need to control it and not let it control you. Take care.
 
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welcome Pastaplz :) so sorry you had to land here to begin with and any new diagnosis comes with a shock usually... especially when there's no known cure. At this stage I guess until you find out what type of diabetes hubby has it does make it a bit hard to tackle. If on insulin though it's not a good idea to completely cut the carbs suddenly as that could lead to hypos which can be scary and dangerous... generally just as bad as hypers (high blood sugar). So depending on what the outcome is then you can make decisions about what to do. There's no harm in starting to limit the carbs now though by cutting portion of carb and then pumping up dishes with non starchy/carb vegies along with protein... just be careful and choose the healthy options when eating carbs (refer Glycemic Index...the lower in number the better). High GI carbs aren't good for anyone, they are generally your refined foods... all the white products really and some fruits too (eg. watermelon). So at least you have the option of getting started until you get the diagnosis. There are so many factors that impact on blood glucose... things like dehydration, lack of sleep, pain, illness, stress, temperature changes can all make our BGLs skyrocket or plummet. It's a tricky thing sometimes to manage... but no matter what a positive attitude makes a difference. You can do this together... your hubby is fortunate to have your love and support which will no doubt he will very much appreciate. I should mention too that when newly diagnosed we do go through a string of emotions and it can take a while to process everything and accept that diabetes is part of our life. Hope all goes well. Keep us posted. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I didn't expect so many people to respond. The doctors really didn't say to much about diet at this point, but because I do all the cooking, I feel responsible for learning what is ok and what isn't to my carb junky husband. He cried the first day, and I cried the first day and yesterday. I am worried about all the other possibilities (thyroid, kidneys) and about what diabetes has done or will do to his body. He is my love! And then it seems like anyone we mention it to says that they know so-and-so and that they have it and their daughter, niece...so then I am worried about heredity. We have a son and I worry that he may develop it and now I worry about him.
I know that I just need to wait until the blood work comes back and stop worrying about the unknown, but it is hard. We have had such a hard past 3 years and it just seems to be piling on right now and getting harder. Thank you all for your words of encouragement.
 

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(((hugs)))

I totally understand the fears. I don't know what I'd do if I lost my husband. He's not diabetic - yet - but he is pre-diabetic and his grandfather was diabetic. Mine was hereditary as well, I am the genetic clone of my grandmother...I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism when I was 10, and insulin resistance made itself apparent when I was in my teens, and a skinny ballet dancer...but it's possible I was always insulin resistant to a degree. I worry for my children, since it's on both sides. I know my middle son favors me a great deal, and I have both of them checked regularly for thyroid and diabetes.

That's one reason I am so passionate about what we eat...and I know my parents roll their eyes at me for including the children on our meal plan, but it's just not worth the risk. They don't NEED cereal and juice every day. It's a huge responsibility, as wife and mother, and I do my best to make sure they don't feel deprived, while still maintaining a healthy diet. I want to make sure they have the best start in life. Right now they consider berries and a small dollop of homemade whipped cream the best dessert ever! lol But they do get the occasional fast food burger, pizza, or ice cream. We shoot for being good 90% of the time, and splurging 10% - which is what my last nutritionist told me to do - so we splurge every 2 weeks and have a "bad" meal and dessert.

I certainly feel responsible for keeping my husband healthy, and he really enjoys my cooking. He has changed so much since before we were married. Before that, he thought fries were a vegetable! Now he eats spaghetti squash, zucchini, kale, spinach...he tries everything once, and as long as it tastes good, he'll eat it. I make sure I put together healthy lunches for him to take to work, and he loves it (the other people in the office are always jealous!). I make him chili with ground sausage and turkey, some kidney beans, chopped zucchini and kale (added veggies!)...or shrimp stir fry with loads of veggies.

And yes onlymep is right, with the insulin you don't want to cut all carbs right away...but do switch to healthier choices (brown rice, whole grain bread, quinoa). See where he is on the insulin first and then if his numbers are still high, you can reduce the carbs. Eventually you'll want to see about backing down off the insulin as you reduce the carbs and gain greater control...but it can definitely take a while to figure out. Just make sure you have glucose tabs or gel or some juice or regular soda in the house in case he gets low.

We're here for you guys!
 
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Welcome to you and your husband. As said above push to get the correct diagnosis of Type 1 or Type 2. Many Type 2's are also normal weight and very fit. The treatment will be different depending on the diagnosis. If he is a Type 2, although initially on insulin he possibly could switch to oral meds as he lowers bgs to normal. But if he is a Type 1, Insulin will be part of his life, forever. If you are uninsured check with the manufactuers of the different Insulins. If you qualify you can get free or reduced price Insulin. I think there are a lot of forms to fill out and may take awhile but it is worth it.
 

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Welcome and sorry your here. I am fairly new to this rabbit hole myself. One thing I can assure you is there is a wealth of information here and strangers who care which is great.
 
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I should add further advice too.... depending on diagnosis of course. If hubby is type 1 then insulin is the only choice as already mentioned... but if type 2 it depends on the state of his pancreas as to whether he can have oral meds or he actually needs insulin. There is such a thing as insulin deficiency... I should know as I have it myself and I have to take insulin as oral meds won't work on me. The other thing to mention is that always have quick acting carbs with you at all times... that means carrying them on your person, in your car, in your house, etc. It's probably a good idea to get hubby to carry something on him all the time that he can quickly grab himself. Hypos happen very quick and they need to be treated very quick... recovery time is a minimum of 30mins but only if you treat it quick. If left it does take a lot longer to recover. Just wanting to give you a heads up here as hopefully your hubby doesn't experience this... but you want to be prepared and know the signs to look out for too. Symptoms can vary from person to person but most people experience loss of judgement, shaking, weakness, sweating, nausea, etc.
 

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Welcome to the forum, we are glad you're here. I hope you find us welcoming and helpful. It is hard for the first few days, weeks and months. Remember to fight this battle one meal/test/day at a time. If he gets a bad number, remember what happened but forget the number and move on. One bad number won't kill us. Everyone else gave you good advice so I'll just say welcome and hang in there!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Type 1 it is. We have been working on diet these past couple weeks and are getting better with knowing how his blood glucose level will be affected by something. Yesterday I made pizzas on the flatout bread. They were ok (he didn't love them) but I still have hope that I can make them better. He ate two whole pizzas and his BG was just fine. I am going to look at the forums to get some more ideas on foods. He would love to only take the Lantus and no humalog...not sure if that is even possible.
 

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That's tough to say. I suppose as an adult type 1, if he went super low carb, he "might" be able to get away with just Lantus. It is important to know that Lantus is really what I refer to as a baseline or foundation insulin. If he has any carbs, the Humolog becomes necessary. He may go through what is called a honeymoon period, where he has just a few cells left still producing insulin, so it might appear that he can handle some carbs without the Humolog, but this will eventually pass.

Realistically, if he can figure out his Humolog ratio (how many units are needed to carbs) he can eat anything. Of course lower carb diets will require less insulin. I stick to about 35 grams of carbs per meal, but strive for healthy carbs if possible. Basically a balanced diet. I also include regular exercise. Bottom line...insulin is your friend :)

Cheers,

Jeremy
 
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