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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi My name is Howard and I'm 62, I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes about 5 years ago, starting with dietry control, I am now taking 2x80mg Gliclazide & 2x100mg Metformin with my morning meal (which usually consists of weetabix & milk) before my meal my sugar level is usually beteen 9 & 10 mmol/L and ywo hours later it has risen to between 14 & 18 this is obviously very high to me (normal level should be between 4 & 7) as the day progresses and I have a light lunch by mid afternoon the level has usually dropped to within the 4 & 7 level, but lately it has stayed up to 12
I take 1x 80mg Gliclazide & another 2x100mg Metforming with my evening meal.
My nmain concern is how high the readings are in the morning and up to mid afternoon. Does anyone know the best way to get these more into the "normal" range ??
Thanks in advance... Howard
 

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Hello Howard and :welcome: to the forum.

The one thing that we can do to solve our blood sugar spike is examine what we're eating. Your breakfast this morning was very high in carbohydrate and that's where your spike comes from.

Contrary to the myths currently in vogue, high carbohydrate diets are poisonous from where we are sitting. On the forum most of us follow a diet low in carbohydrate and high in fat. Yes, I did say fat! Have a look at this LCHF for Beginners | DietDoctor.com

Another site, well worth exploring is Blood Sugar 101 This site discusses a lot of issues we do need to consider in managing our condition. The ideas are backed up by links to the scientific research behind them. In particular, it discusses the medication options available and pulls no punches on the side effects that don't get the attention they perhaps deserve. Do have a read!

Other members will be along in a minute, but feel free to explore the forums and in particular, have a look at our recipes section and the meal threads http://www.diabetesforum.com/diabetes-diet-nutrition/4227-whats-dinner.html , http://www.diabetesforum.com/diabetes-diet-nutrition/6926-whats-lunch.html and http://www.diabetesforum.com/diabetes-diet-nutrition/6633-whats-breakfast.html

Again, :welcome:
 

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weetabix is very high in carbohydrates (carbs), carbs raise BG its eating the weetabix in the morning that is raiseing your BG 5 to 18 points. Try 2 eggs and bacon or bangers. No bread no orange juice no porage... coffee or tee to drink with no sugar or honey. then test your BG after.
 

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Hello Howard,
John has given you some excellent links. Do look them up.

Metformin is usually prescribed on basis of weight. 2x100 even if given twice appears to be a low dose. Are you sure the pills are 100 mg each ? The other drug is a Sulfonylureal. It's kinda avoidable as it stresses the pancreas to secrete more insulin. If you look at some of the older threads, you will find lots of references to this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
weetabix is very high in carbohydrates (carbs), carbs raise BG its eating the weetabix in the morning that is raiseing your BG 5 to 18 points. Try 2 eggs and bacon or bangers. No bread no orange juice no porage... coffee or tee to drink with no sugar or honey. then test your BG after.
Thanks, I was advised by dietician to avoid fatty foods and follow a healthy diet (5 a day etc) however this suggestion does appeal as I have been missing my bacon and eggs.. I'll try it for a few days and see what happens.. all the best, Howard
 

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Hi Howard, good advice given so far. Cutting the carbs at breakfast has been brought up because you specifically mentioned what you ate for breakfast. Reducing carbs is also important to do for other meals as well. Carbs is the main thing driving BG up, so it only makes sense that this needs to be reduced, and there is no need to worry about not getting some necessary nutrients with carb reduction, because that is not going to happen.

What are your other meals like? Do you have other health issues and/or take other medications? It is much easier to offer advice knowing the bigger picture.

As others have mentioned, the glic is not a good choice of med. T2s already have a problem making or using what insulin is already available. Why force the body to make even more. Excess insulin floating around is not a good thing either.
 

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My main concern is how high the readings are in the morning and up to mid afternoon. Does anyone know the best way to get these more into the "normal" range ??
Oh yes, we do know how to do it. Many of us have been able to achieve near normal BG levels through diet alone. I was 63 when dx'd and within a couple weeks my BG was well under the level where damage occurs. (disclaimer: everyone is different, some take longer than others - we call that YMMV "Your Mileage May Vary")

Do read the links John posted. When you finish reading BS101 you will know more about diabetes and how to gain control over it than your doctor (especially any doctor that advises a high carb/low fat diet).

Stick around here, read the threads. You will be encouraged that you, too, can be successful and have a diabetes complication-free future.
 

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Thanks, I was advised by dietician to avoid fatty foods and follow a healthy diet (5 a day etc) however this suggestion does appeal as I have been missing my bacon and eggs.. I'll try it for a few days and see what happens.. all the best, Howard
Dieticians have to follow their dogma or lose their certification.

The best diet is one your meter agrees with. This varies for everyone but generally involves keeping your carb count for the DAY under what you've been to eat per meal. You'll also find many if your current "forbidden foods" like your beloved bacon and eggs are once again back in your diet and in abundance :). As an example, I eat about 20 eggs and over a pound of bacon per week.

Good luck and ask all the questions you have.

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi Howard, good advice given so far. Cutting the carbs at breakfast has been brought up because you specifically mentioned what you ate for breakfast. Reducing carbs is also important to do for other meals as well. Carbs is the main thing driving BG up, so it only makes sense that this needs to be reduced, and there is no need to worry about not getting some necessary nutrients with carb reduction, because that is not going to happen.

What are your other meals like? Do you have other health issues and/or take other medications? It is much easier to offer advice knowing the bigger picture.

As others have mentioned, the glic is not a good choice of med. T2s already have a problem making or using what insulin is already available. Why force the body to make even more. Excess insulin floating around is not a good thing either.
Thanks again, the other meds I take are a statin 1 tab (night) and also 1 ramipril tab at night too (I was told my blood pressure was borderline high, but being diabetic it would be advisable to keep it from getting higher)
At lunch I tend to eat soup or something similar. For my main evening meal during the week mainly chicken + veg , fish + veg etc.. I treat myself to a curry or the like over the weekend.
 

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Thanks, I was advised by dietician to avoid fatty foods and follow a healthy diet (5 a day etc) however this suggestion does appeal as I have been missing my bacon and eggs.. I'll try it for a few days and see what happens.. all the best, Howard
And Howard? What the outside world considers 'healthy' is absolutely NOT healthy for us diabetics, who cannot metabolize carbohydrate so well as ordinary people. My own suspicion is that carb-heavy diets aren't all that healthy for the general non-diabetic population either, but that's another discussion for another day.

What I want to mention here though, is that 'a few days' isn't going to show you much (except lower blood sugar readings on your meter, of course, which is tremendous! ;)), but in order to discover all the amazing benefits of LCHF, it takes a coupla months at the very least. You'll begin to feel energized and you may notice other symptoms disappearing - symptoms you never associated with diabetes. I was delighted to be rid of acid reflux, bloating/belching/flatulence, and other indicators of GERD. And after a year or so on LCHF, I was delighted and amazed to see my blood pressure dropping, and my cholesterol numbers restored to healthy levels without the use of a statin drug. My doctor is SO on board with this way-of-eating now - he has seen my progress and it is not lost on him that I did it without statins.

I usually encourage people that they need not take our word for it - they need to commit to using LCHF for eight/ten weeks and see what they think after that. Then they may decide they want to extend the commitment to a lifetime! :cool:
 

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I took my statin drug and threw in the drawer. My next appt my doctor not even doing a lipid panel, so I won't know how that affected my profile, but really do I care? NOT, I was having symptoms of demetia, and after discarding them, I feel much better, but not 100% but at least (my daughter's opinion) I'm not slurring my words. And Oh the coconut oil didn't hurt either.
 

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Hi Howard, and welcome to the forum! You've been given great advice and all the links to read already, so I will just add my Welcome.

Please do give lc/hf a good go for at least a couple of months as Shanny suggested. I think you will be well pleased with the results.
 
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