The Diabetes Forum Support Community For Diabetics Online banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been dating a man for a couple of months and we are starting to get serious. He is overweight and a Type 2 diabetic. He has blood sugar spikes into the 400s on what I would guess to be at least a weekly basis. The major complication he experiences with these spikes is eye strain/impaired vision. Since he works in front of a computer, this sometimes interferes with his job.

He has asked me to help him with his food choices and exercise. I have ordered a few diabetes cookbooks and we are going to start taking walks together on weekday mornings. I am here to learn what I can and am always open to suggestions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
710 Posts
If it were me, I'd ignore the diabetes cookbooks - they are generally based on ADA guidelines and are too high in carbs. Reduce or eliminate the starchy carbs (rice, potatoes, pasta, grains) and things like fruit juice and low fat dairy products. Build menus around fresh meats, fish, poultry and non-starchy veggies (all kinds of greens, eggplant, tomato, some peppers, the brassicas, radishes....the list is long). Pick up any of Dana Carpender's wonder compendiums of low-carb recipes and modify them to your taste. Really, any cookbook has recipes that can be adapted to fit the needs of pretty much any diabetic. Up with low GI veggies, down with starches. Include fats like avocado, coconut oil, olive oil, some butter....you are on the way to a wonderful adventure and dietary changes for your boyfriend.

Check out recipes here on DF. I just posted a couple in the thread "What's for Dinner", and there are many resourceful and adventurous foodies here.

Jen
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
I wouldn't call it a mistake, just a learning process. The ADA might have some good recipes and you can use it maybe as a base. Start with something you want to try and tweak it to make it low carb. There's a TON of recipes here in the diet area too that have feed back and/or suggestions
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,394 Posts
Welcome aboard, FreedSpirit! The experts rarely ever tell us about the carb situation with diabetes, so what you're seeing here is what we've each learned individually by trial/error with our own ways-of-eating.

For whatever obscure reasons, the ADA chooses to promote carbs, and many diabetes professionals fall in line, even though it's very easy to prove the converse: Carbs raise blood sugar, and anyone using a meter regularly knows it. But the ADA & their disciples circumvent that issue by instructing people that they don't need to test. Don't be fooled! Your friend needs to test and test a lot - at least until he learns which foods keep him safely under 140 mg/dl.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,771 Posts
I have been dating a man for a couple of months and we are starting to get serious. He is overweight and a Type 2 diabetic. He has blood sugar spikes into the 400s on what I would guess to be at least a weekly basis. The major complication he experiences with these spikes is eye strain/impaired vision. Since he works in front of a computer, this sometimes interferes with his job.

He has asked me to help him with his food choices and exercise. I have ordered a few diabetes cookbooks and we are going to start taking walks together on weekday mornings. I am here to learn what I can and am always open to suggestions.
Hi FreedSpirit and welcome to the forum. We will try and help you get your man in shape for this serious relationship. :) How exciting! Just a few things, we have so much information on the forum so read what interests you and if you can't find something do a search by typing in your subject in the white search box on the forum page. There are no stupid questions here, ask if it is on your mind. Food choices, kind of simple, low carbs. Is your BF on insulin? What kind of foods do you eat when you are together? How overweight are we talking about? What type of exercise is fun for the 2 of you? Walking or stationary bike is a good place to start. I hope you have time to visit often! Have a nice day! :welcome:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,491 Posts
I have been dating a man for a couple of months and we are starting to get serious. He is overweight and a Type 2 diabetic. He has blood sugar spikes into the 400s on what I would guess to be at least a weekly basis. The major complication he experiences with these spikes is eye strain/impaired vision. Since he works in front of a computer, this sometimes interferes with his job.

He has asked me to help him with his food choices and exercise. I have ordered a few diabetes cookbooks and we are going to start taking walks together on weekday mornings. I am here to learn what I can and am always open to suggestions.
Hi and :welcome: from me, also!

Your significant other is really lucky to have you, and kudos to you for caring enough to do some research!

I'm a type-II, and overweight (but steadily losing, yay!) and have really managed to turn my situation around through low-carb diet, daily exercise (well, usually 6 days a week) and weight loss. I'm also on Metformin 2x a day (Extended-release) but am really hoping I can eventually control through diet/exercise alone... time will tell!

Ask us anything, that's what we're here for.
 
G

·
welcome FreedSpirit :) great to hear you care enough about your significant other to help him make a difference. I'm not sure what his treatment is? Others have already advised the low carb way which I agree with. I'm a bit of the odd one out as I can't eat high fat (especially animal fat) as my LDL goes up (I've proven it)... but others here seem to have no worries with their cholesterol and are happy eating lots of meat and various oils in place of carbs. I would approach with caution.. particularly because you say your man is overweight. Focus on increasing fibre in his diet as that helps keep hunger pangs at bay. Learn about what types of carbs are good for you too... look up "glycemic index" (GI)... basically the lower the GI the better. We have to try and avoid those sudden spikes in sugar levels. It's pretty much about portion control and all foods in moderation really. If you do increase fat intake.. make sure cholesterol is checked. Remember also that fat is pure calories... so not a good option if your man needs to lose weight. Using the meter to check what foods are a problem, etc. is a good idea too. Keep us posted on how things are going.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,368 Posts
When I was newly dx'd I made the same mistake. I remember in the first months of diabetes I went to Borders and spent hours thumbing through books. I bought anything with the word Diabetes in it. I thought it was great because I could eat almost anything, until I learned what carbs did to my bgs. Most Type 2 diabetics are very insulin resistant. This sometimes causes us to be overweight even though we don't eat any more than a normal person. Many of us are also carb addicts. The more we eat the more we crave. I would suggest you get a hold of a book called DIABETES SOLUTIONS by Dr Bernstein
Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes Solution. A Complete Guide to Achieving Normal Blood Sugars. Official Web Site You can even read some of the chapters free online. If your boyfriend follows his low carb program, it will help control his insulin resistance. Also what meds is he on? He may need different meds to control bg better. I find there are great recipes here in the recipe forum or online. My favorite sites are

Linda's Low Carb Menus & Recipes - Home

Low Carb Diets at About.com - Atkins South Beach and More Low Carb Diets
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,607 Posts
I have been dating a man for a couple of months and we are starting to get serious. He is overweight and a Type 2 diabetic. He has blood sugar spikes into the 400s on what I would guess to be at least a weekly basis. The major complication he experiences with these spikes is eye strain/impaired vision. Since he works in front of a computer, this sometimes interferes with his job.

He has asked me to help him with his food choices and exercise. I have ordered a few diabetes cookbooks and we are going to start taking walks together on weekday mornings. I am here to learn what I can and am always open to suggestions.
Hello there - everyone so far has covered it ! Carbs are the enemy.

One other web site well worth a look is Blood Sugar 101 - Jenny Ruhl's pages on managing blood sugars are excellent and avoid bogging themselves down in technical jargon. Dr Bernstein's book is well worth reading but it can be heavy going :smile:

Good luck, John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
165 Posts
Hi. i'd suggest he track what he eats and what sugars he's getting to get a better idea what he needs to work on and what food works for him and what doesn't
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you all for the welcomes and advice. I have been sick, so it has taken me a while to get back here. In answer to some of your questions, I don't think my boyfriend knows exactly how much he weighs. If I had to guess (and I'm terrible at this), I'd say around 350, maybe? I can't remember what medications he told me he was on, and he said one was new, and I hadn't heard of it before.

I did tell him I was concerned that he had spikes so often, and wondered if his meds might need to be adjusted. He has an appointment with his primary care physician this week, and his endocrinologist in a couple of weeks.

I got the Glycemic Load Diet book and the companion cookbook. I am about to start reading those.

The amount of information (sometimes conflicting) is overwhelming. Thanks for giving me somewhere to start.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,368 Posts
Type 2 diabetes is a lot of trial and error with meals and snacks. The best advice given to me was "EAT TO YOUR METER" This means testing before and after meals and seeing what your spike is. Eventually you want the 2 hour after meal number to be 120-140. I know this sound like there is no way your boyfriend can do it but many of us started out with high bgs. Look at the carbs he is eating in meals and try to reduce it to the minimum. Quite frankly we don't need many carbs to survive. We can get most of the carbs from vegetables. Most meals should be a good portion of meat and a couple portions of veggies. Do that for a few weeks and I think he will see those bgs come down. Dump the breakfast cereals, breads, pasta and potatoes and rice. Bacon and eggs for breakfast, bunless bacon cheese burger for lunch with a salad and steak, salad and green veggie for dinner. I think you get my gist. I do make low carb cookies and muffins, if you want some recipes let me know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I was on 3x850 metformin and 1 glicazide daily. I am 6 foot tall and used to weigh around 15st.4lb I have never smoked and used to box until my early thirties. I have done many challenges, distant running that kind of thing.
I guess what I am trying to say is that I had a pretty healthy lifestyle.
Then in my late forties whilst doing the three peaks challenge in the UK, I suddenly ran out of steam. This continued into every day life and you know the rest.
I knew that it would help to get some weight off, so despite not having the energy to do exercise I had to come up with a plan.
I decided to attack the carbs, they were my friend once, but not now.
So for breakfast its tomatoes, lentils, peppers ,chopped beetroot and a boiled egg.
Lunch is a salad usually with mackeral or another oily fish.
Main meal would include carbs such as potatoes. Just a normal meal really.
My weight has dropped over a few months to around 14. 3 and I only take 1 metformin and still the 1 glicazide.
I will never be an athlete again, but I do think I can start doing some light exercise now and again.
So just cutting back on a few carbs could make a difference. Just make sure he monitors everything, because we as diabetics all respond a little differently.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks Andy. Just from the posts I have read here, I can tell that everyone responds differently, and tracking is the best way to figure out what works best individually. He has been reluctant to keep a food journal, but I found an Android app called OnTrack Diabetes that he is trying out this week. I know that he needs to see what his habits/patterns are now in order to figure out what needs to change.

I think one of the obstacles he's facing is that he is the kind of person who puts all of his effort into taking care of everyone else. We had a talk about that today, actually. He has primary custody of his 2 daughters, and I pointed out that he would be better able to take care of them (and for longer) if he starts taking better care of himself. I think he knows that in his head, but (I know from my own experience) it's harder to put that into practice.

We haven't been able to start walking yet, because each morning we've planned to, his blood sugar has been over 250. We will keep trying, though.

Thanks again for all your responses!
 
G

·
He has primary custody of his 2 daughters, and I pointed out that he would be better able to take care of them (and for longer) if he starts taking better care of himself. I think he knows that in his head, but (I know from my own experience) it's harder to put that into practice.
Pretty much that is what it takes... you're spot on!
If we don't take care of ourselves, who else will? I'm similar to your hubby in that I am a person that puts everyone else's interest ahead of mine. I'm a caring person.... but often in the past that has meant that I have been left with next to no time to care for myself. I try my best though... don't get me wrong... but I'm also a perfectionist and I'm always wondering if I can do better. But now I have a few chronic conditions medically.... it's all become one big juggling/balancing thing and I sometimes think I'm focusing too much on myself these days. I simply have run out of energy most of the time. I hope your hubby thinks of his daughters and everyone else he loves and that motivates him enough to do the best he can for himself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
onlymep said:
Pretty much that is what it takes... you're spot on!
If we don't take care of ourselves, who else will? I'm similar to your hubby in that I am a person that puts everyone else's interest ahead of mine. I'm a caring person.... but often in the past that has meant that I have been left with next to no time to care for myself. I try my best though... don't get me wrong... but I'm also a perfectionist and I'm always wondering if I can do better. But now I have a few chronic conditions medically.... it's all become one big juggling/balancing thing and I sometimes think I'm focusing too much on myself these days. I simply have run out of energy most of the time. I hope your hubby thinks of his daughters and everyone else he loves and that motivates him enough to do the best he can for himself.
Boyfriend, not hubby. Let's not get ahead of ourselves. Lol.

I am the same way and it took a bad marriage to wake me up and start learning that it's ok to look out for myself too. That's why I recognize it in him and know it's a hard lesson to learn.

He has said that he now finds himself wanting to be healthy for me. I'd still prefer that he find the motivation to be healthy for himself, but even so, at least it's a start.

I went to a doctor's appointment with him last week. When we walked into the back, the nurse stopped at the scale, but before she could say anything, he just shook his head and said "The scale won't work." I can only imagine how tough that was to say out loud, especially with me coming along for the first time. I catch glimpses sometimes of what his life is like for him now, and it breaks my heart. That night I found myself trying to find a support forum for people with loved ones who are severely overweight. I just want him to feel loved and be able to accept it, but I think he's so used to being treated differently because of his size that he has trouble believing it.

Yesterday he said that sometimes there's a part of him that says "If you really loved her, you'd tell her to go be with someone whose health isn't such a mess." I told him I don't want someone else in better health, I want him...in better health. So I can keep him longer. That seemed to help, but it still makes me sad that he would even think that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,771 Posts
Boyfriend, not hubby. Let's not get ahead of ourselves. Lol.

I am the same way and it took a bad marriage to wake me up and start learning that it's ok to look out for myself too. That's why I recognize it in him and know it's a hard lesson to learn.

He has said that he now finds himself wanting to be healthy for me. I'd still prefer that he find the motivation to be healthy for himself, but even so, at least it's a start.

I went to a doctor's appointment with him last week. When we walked into the back, the nurse stopped at the scale, but before she could say anything, he just shook his head and said "The scale won't work." I can only imagine how tough that was to say out loud, especially with me coming along for the first time. I catch glimpses sometimes of what his life is like for him now, and it breaks my heart. That night I found myself trying to find a support forum for people with loved ones who are severely overweight. I just want him to feel loved and be able to accept it, but I think he's so used to being treated differently because of his size that he has trouble believing it.

Yesterday he said that sometimes there's a part of him that says "If you really loved her, you'd tell her to go be with someone whose health isn't such a mess." I told him I don't want someone else in better health, I want him...in better health. So I can keep him longer. That seemed to help, but it still makes me sad that he would even think that.
You seem to have his best interest at heart, that is not always the case with someone who has a progressive disease. Maybe, you can get his diabetes really under control and this disease can be controlled with diet and exercise. Thanks for supporting him!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
breezeonby said:
You seem to have his best interest at heart, that is not always the case with someone who has a progressive disease. Maybe, you can get his diabetes really under control and this disease can be controlled with diet and exercise. Thanks for supporting him!
Thank you. I hope so. He is very special.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top