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Hello!

I was told by my doctor today that I definitely have diabetes, though she didn't mention which type. If there's a way to distinguish between types via symptoms, I haven't learned about it yet, so you'll have to forgive me. I really don't know anything about diabetes yet and I expect the next few weeks will be a bit like a study/cram session.

Not sure where to start, so I'll just throw out some possibly relevant facts. I'm 22 year old, 23 in June. I'm about 5'5 and weigh 138lbs. Two weeks ago I weighed about 150, which was the biggest clue that I needed to see a doctor. I also got really thirsty and my eyes decided they wanted the world to be a good bit more blurry. I already wore glasses but I suddenly suspected I'd picked up the wrong prescription.

So I saw the doctor. Yesterday they stole some of my blood and I found out my blood sugar was at 266. Woah. I went back again today (this time having fasted for longer than 12 hours since I accidentally slept most of the day away and had planned on going in the morning) and found my blood sugar was 131.

My Ac1 was 10.4, though admittedly I don't know what an Ac1 is.

So along with the results of the blood work, I received an email from my doctor confirming the diabetes in addition to iron deficiency anemia which isn't all that surprising. Half the time I give blood I'm turned away for low iron and I was anemic as a child. I just like giving blood because I'm fascinated by the fact that I have blood type AB- which is supposed to be a bit rare :rolleyes: So I feel special.

That's about all I know so far. I have another doctor's appointment in two days to discuss medication and I'm supposed to see an endocrinologist and a nutritionist.

I know most questions will be answered by the doctors, but are there any questions you wish you'd asked in the beginning that you didn't even know to ask? Or advice or tips or suggestions for setting myself on the right path? This was a bit of a surprise for me since I didn't think there was much danger of it unless I gained a few more pounds, though I do have PCOS which probably should have made me pay more attention to what I was eating. I love all the things that are bad for me: chocolate, cheese, potatoes, and sushi being among my top vices.

Thanks for listening. Sorry for the novel. When I'm nervous, I type.
 

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Hello, welcome to Diabetes Forum! You are going to the right kind of doctor, so your diagnosis and treatment should be the correct ones for you. I can detect a willingness to accept your diabetes and a desire to work hard at keeping it under good control. So many newly diagnosed diabetics do not accept their condition and do not have good control. Your being here and asking questions is a good sign.

Your A1c is a blood test that gives you an average blood glucose (blood sugar) for the preceding 3 months. A 6.5 or less is desired for diabetics to indicate good control. An a1c less than 6.0 is expected for non diabetics. Your A1c was very high. When your type is determined and the treatment is prescribed, your A1c will be reduced to a much lower number. that and a treatment for your anemia will make you feel much better.

Richard
 

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Hello!

I was told by my doctor today that I definitely have diabetes, though she didn't mention which type. If there's a way to distinguish between types via symptoms, I haven't learned about it yet, so you'll have to forgive me. I really don't know anything about diabetes yet and I expect the next few weeks will be a bit like a study/cram session.
Welcome to the forum. Glad you found us...sorry you needed us :) The symptoms/complications are pretty much the same. The disease itself is a little different. Type 1 does not make insulin at all or very little. They are insulin dependant from the get-go. Type 2 is different in that initially they are making insulin, either a normal amount, or sometimes not enough. Type 2's all have something called insulin resistance that prevents them from using the insulin they have properly. Many Type 2's often eventually over time gradually decrease their ability to produce their own insulin and may also become insulin dependant. There is also something called slow onset type 1 or Latent Autoimmune Diabetes (type 1.5) where the antibodies that attack the beta cells are present that lead to type 1...it is just slower onset. Your endocrinologist should be able to tell you what type you are.

So I saw the doctor. Yesterday they stole some of my blood and I found out my blood sugar was at 266. Woah. I went back again today (this time having fasted for longer than 12 hours since I accidentally slept most of the day away and had planned on going in the morning) and found my blood sugar was 131.

My Ac1 was 10.4, though admittedly I don't know what an Ac1 is.
Yup...quite high. With some treatment and a little work on your part I am sure you can get those numbers back down where they belong!

I just like giving blood because I'm fascinated by the fact that I have blood type AB- which is supposed to be a bit rare :rolleyes: So I feel special.
I am type AB+...hooray for us rare ones!

That's about all I know so far. I have another doctor's appointment in two days to discuss medication and I'm supposed to see an endocrinologist and a nutritionist.
Thats the best place to start. Your medical team are going to be your best friends for awhile!

I know most questions will be answered by the doctors, but are there any questions you wish you'd asked in the beginning that you didn't even know to ask? Or advice or tips or suggestions for setting myself on the right path? This was a bit of a surprise for me since I didn't think there was much danger of it unless I gained a few more pounds, though I do have PCOS which probably should have made me pay more attention to what I was eating. I love all the things that are bad for me: chocolate, cheese, potatoes, and sushi being among my top vices.

Thanks for listening. Sorry for the novel. When I'm nervous, I type.
PCOS and type 2 diabetes go hand in hand in seems. There is definately a link there. I was also PCOS and diagnosed as a type 2 at age 16 (which is young for a type 2). We all love the things that are bad for us! But you dont necessarily have to give up everything you love. You just need to incorporate things that are good substitutes...or you just have to have a little of what you love and work it into your meal plan. I still have a piece of chocolate every now and then. The difference is...I have a hershey kiss....not the whole hershey bar :)

We are here if you have questions....dont worry..there are no dumb questions! Lots of people here that have been living with diabetes for a long time and are a wealth of info!

Let us know how you are doing soon!
 

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Welcome aboard, Candlelight. Thank you for joining us & don't worry about long posts . . . we love 'em! Many of us are similarly "afflicted" with this writing ability! heheh! :D (so this goes for you too, Bruce . . . long posts? Not a problem!)
 

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Welcome aboard, Candlelight. Thank you for joining us & don't worry about long posts . . . we love 'em! Many of us are similarly "afflicted" with this writing ability! heheh! :D (so this goes for you too, Bruce . . . long posts? Not a problem!)
Hey! I resemble that remark...... :p
 

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Hello!

I was told by my doctor today that I definitely have diabetes, though she didn't mention which type. If there's a way to distinguish between types via symptoms, I haven't learned about it yet, so you'll have to forgive me. I really don't know anything about diabetes yet and I expect the next few weeks will be a bit like a study/cram session.

Not sure where to start, so I'll just throw out some possibly relevant facts. I'm 22 year old, 23 in June. I'm about 5'5 and weigh 138lbs. Two weeks ago I weighed about 150, which was the biggest clue that I needed to see a doctor. I also got really thirsty and my eyes decided they wanted the world to be a good bit more blurry. I already wore glasses but I suddenly suspected I'd picked up the wrong prescription.

So I saw the doctor. Yesterday they stole some of my blood and I found out my blood sugar was at 266. Woah. I went back again today (this time having fasted for longer than 12 hours since I accidentally slept most of the day away and had planned on going in the morning) and found my blood sugar was 131.

My Ac1 was 10.4, though admittedly I don't know what an Ac1 is.

So along with the results of the blood work, I received an email from my doctor confirming the diabetes in addition to iron deficiency anemia which isn't all that surprising. Half the time I give blood I'm turned away for low iron and I was anemic as a child. I just like giving blood because I'm fascinated by the fact that I have blood type AB- which is supposed to be a bit rare :rolleyes: So I feel special.

That's about all I know so far. I have another doctor's appointment in two days to discuss medication and I'm supposed to see an endocrinologist and a nutritionist.

I know most questions will be answered by the doctors, but are there any questions you wish you'd asked in the beginning that you didn't even know to ask? Or advice or tips or suggestions for setting myself on the right path? This was a bit of a surprise for me since I didn't think there was much danger of it unless I gained a few more pounds, though I do have PCOS which probably should have made me pay more attention to what I was eating. I love all the things that are bad for me: chocolate, cheese, potatoes, and sushi being among my top vices.

Thanks for listening. Sorry for the novel. When I'm nervous, I type.
Welcome to the forum. You are right, the next few weeks you are going to be given so much information about diabetes. I suggest you ask your doctor for a referral to a diabetes-self management class. You will learn the basics and they are usually taught by a diabetes educator and nurses. I can relate to the rapid weight loss, this happened to me last year when I was not treating or testing. And the vision issues, how disturbing they can be. I would ask your doctor when to test and also what your target blood glucose levels should be. Ask what your fasting BG (blood glucose) should be and your pre-meal and post-meal and bedtime readings. These readings are really important to know and be persistent in getting the ranges. There are also so many websites that are for diabetics, you can get just about any questions answered that you may have. Try Blood Sugar 101 and Diabetes.... Facts And Information For Diabetics And Others. I wish you the best luck in the next few weeks and hope that you will visit the forum often and let us know how you are doing.
 

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Wow you guys! Thank you so much for all taking the time to respond. I feel a bit unequal since this is supposed to be a sharing site and I kind of plopped in with a ‘gimmie’ attitude and not much to offer for it. I have an appointment with the endocrinologist this afternoon, managed to slip into a free appointment spot, hooray!

Oh, my name is Jenny by the way. I forgot that bit the first time. I also answer to ‘hey you’ and ‘omgputdownthatgiantchocolatebar’.

@ Richard
I’m trying to be willing, I really am. I have a puppy’s own attention span so I’m trying to lock in a few habits before my mind wanders off in search of something shiny to play with. Or a new Dresden novel. Alright so the high A1c means I’ve had it for a while then? The symptoms started so quickly I was kind of thrown for a loop. Thank you for the response.

@ onaughmae
Well thank you for the welcome! Better to be among those who know what they’re doing, right? :D I understand (I think) about the differences you were describing. I’m a bit nervous to find out which I have. I hope it’s type 2 since I believe it’s easier to manage. Or something like that. Oooh, you’re type AB too! XD Now I know who to call if I’ve been in a horrible accident and need a transfusion. Muahaha! Oh no, self control? DX My mortal enemy! Eating just one Hershey kiss sounds like some form of torture. I think I’d rather just keep them out of the house ^^;;

@ Shanny
Thank you. I actually love writing. Starting the first of May a friend and I are going to race to finish a novel each, just as a way of encouraging ourselves to practice. Then after editing we get to compete for rejection letters from publishing companies. Whoever gets the most wins! And whoever doesn’t get a rejection… also wins :D

@breezeonby
Thanks for the advice. I’ll ask her about it. Do those kinds of classes usually take place at a doctor’s or some other place? Thank you for all the question suggestions, I’ll be sure to take them with me when I go. I haven’t had too much of a chance to look at the websites yet, but I’ve bookmarked them so I don’t forget to go back and study up. :) This forum seems pretty friendly so I hope I can stick around and gradually contribute to discussions and things.
 

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Let us know how your appointment goes :) No matter which type you have..they all have their hard points to manage I am afraid. Type 1's are more prone to super quick highs and lows....but then again so are insulin dependant type 2's *shrug* Everyone is different. We will keep our fingers crossed for the best!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Let us know how your appointment goes :) No matter which type you have..they all have their hard points to manage I am afraid. Type 1's are more prone to super quick highs and lows....but then again so are insulin dependant type 2's *shrug* Everyone is different. We will keep our fingers crossed for the best!
Thank you ^^ I'm glad the appointment is today at least. I get nervous waiting for things. When my symptoms first started to develop to the point where I wanted help, my doctor had just gone out of town and I had to wait a week to see her. That was a very long seven days for me.
 

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Thank you ^^ I'm glad the appointment is today at least. I get nervous waiting for things. When my symptoms first started to develop to the point where I wanted help, my doctor had just gone out of town and I had to wait a week to see her. That was a very long seven days for me.
I can imagine. Waiting for results always make time seem to crawl. At least you are going to be on your way to better health now. It really isnt so bad once you get used to it. Sometimes I almost make a game out of it. For instance, it is almost time for my next A1C test and I am so excited to see the results. I have worked really hard on my control for the last 3 months. I really enjoy figuring out how to change up recipes so that it is good for me, yet my hubby will still eat it too :) I always make sure I carry my little diabetic "kit" with me when I go out. I keep extra insulin, extra pump supplies and syringes, my meter and a couple of "rescue snacks" in case I need them. I also wear a medic alert bracelet all the time and I encourage others to do so also. You never know when you will need it. Even if your emergency isnt diabetes related. I dont really want to have a car accident or something and they hook up an IV full dextrose to me without knowing I am diabetic :)

I am sure you will have lots questions and we are looking forward to hearing how you are doing after your appointment!
 

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I can imagine. Waiting for results always make time seem to crawl. At least you are going to be on your way to better health now. It really isnt so bad once you get used to it. Sometimes I almost make a game out of it. For instance, it is almost time for my next A1C test and I am so excited to see the results. I have worked really hard on my control for the last 3 months. I really enjoy figuring out how to change up recipes so that it is good for me, yet my hubby will still eat it too :) I always make sure I carry my little diabetic "kit" with me when I go out. I keep extra insulin, extra pump supplies and syringes, my meter and a couple of "rescue snacks" in case I need them. I also wear a medic alert bracelet all the time and I encourage others to do so also. You never know when you will need it. Even if your emergency isnt diabetes related. I dont really want to have a car accident or something and they hook up an IV full dextrose to me without knowing I am diabetic :)

I am sure you will have lots questions and we are looking forward to hearing how you are doing after your appointment!
Oh man I hope all your hard work shows. I know it will have paid off, but sometimes it’s more gratifying to see it in numbers even if you already know you improved mentally. Hopefully I’ll follow your example and stick with it. The bit about making a game out of it is a good idea. Nothing stirs me up like a bit of competition.

How hard is it to travel with that kit? I’m supposed to help out at my sister’s youth girl’s camp this year as an assistant to the chef (ironically enough) and I really don’t want to have to miss it. I’ve been looking forward to going for months now and I really miss attending as a camper myself.
 

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Jenny, I love your sense of humor! Lol! I have finished my first book: "Beating The Odds: 64 Years Of Diabetes Health". I used the self publishing option on amazon.com. That way I was less likely to be rejected. It has been selling very well.

To see my amazon page type "Beating The Odds 64" in the search box on amazon's home page.

Richard
 

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@ Richard

Humor is my default defense against anything. And offense. And laughing is my favorite part of anything ever. So if I'm here long, please expect a lot of corny jokes and the occasional bad pun.

Wow congratulations! I'm honestly impressed by anyone who can write a book and have it sell. Actually I'm impressed by anyone who can write a book. I'm a literature fan.
 

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Oh man I hope all your hard work shows. I know it will have paid off, but sometimes it’s more gratifying to see it in numbers even if you already know you improved mentally. Hopefully I’ll follow your example and stick with it. The bit about making a game out of it is a good idea. Nothing stirs me up like a bit of competition.

How hard is it to travel with that kit? I’m supposed to help out at my sister’s youth girl’s camp this year as an assistant to the chef (ironically enough) and I really don’t want to have to miss it. I’ve been looking forward to going for months now and I really miss attending as a camper myself.
Not a problem for me at all. I keep it all in a makeup type bag and just toss it in my purse. I carry a purse big enough to hide bodies in though! LOL
 

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Wow you guys! Thank you so much for all taking the time to respond. I feel a bit unequal since this is supposed to be a sharing site and I kind of plopped in with a ‘gimmie’ attitude and not much to offer for it. I have an appointment with the endocrinologist this afternoon, managed to slip into a free appointment spot, hooray!

Oh, my name is Jenny by the way. I forgot that bit the first time. I also answer to ‘hey you’ and ‘omgputdownthatgiantchocolatebar’.

@ Richard
I’m trying to be willing, I really am. I have a puppy’s own attention span so I’m trying to lock in a few habits before my mind wanders off in search of something shiny to play with. Or a new Dresden novel. Alright so the high A1c means I’ve had it for a while then? The symptoms started so quickly I was kind of thrown for a loop. Thank you for the response.

@ onaughmae
Well thank you for the welcome! Better to be among those who know what they’re doing, right? :D I understand (I think) about the differences you were describing. I’m a bit nervous to find out which I have. I hope it’s type 2 since I believe it’s easier to manage. Or something like that. Oooh, you’re type AB too! XD Now I know who to call if I’ve been in a horrible accident and need a transfusion. Muahaha! Oh no, self control? DX My mortal enemy! Eating just one Hershey kiss sounds like some form of torture. I think I’d rather just keep them out of the house ^^;;

@ Shanny
Thank you. I actually love writing. Starting the first of May a friend and I are going to race to finish a novel each, just as a way of encouraging ourselves to practice. Then after editing we get to compete for rejection letters from publishing companies. Whoever gets the most wins! And whoever doesn’t get a rejection… also wins :D

@breezeonby
Thanks for the advice. I’ll ask her about it. Do those kinds of classes usually take place at a doctor’s or some other place? Thank you for all the question suggestions, I’ll be sure to take them with me when I go. I haven’t had too much of a chance to look at the websites yet, but I’ve bookmarked them so I don’t forget to go back and study up. :) This forum seems pretty friendly so I hope I can stick around and gradually contribute to discussions and things.
There are many places that hold diabetes self-management classes. Ask your doctor or google diabetes self management for your city and see what pops up. Also, if you live in a large city or near one, they may have a local diabetes association chapter and you can call and ask them. Many hospitals hold classes as well.
 

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Wow. Tonight was interesting. My doctor's appointment ended up lasting 4 hours.

It started out fairly basic. The lab to determine if I have type 1 or type 2 hadn't come back yet and in the meantime they decided to put me on 3 units of once-a-day insulin and told me to start keeping track of my blood sugar before and after meals. In teaching me how to check my blood sugar, the nurse had me check mine there in front of her. I had a reading of 357.

At this point the nurse excused herself to go find the doctor.

I ended up in urgent care where an unfortunate nurse discovered my veins had declared war on needles and the poor woman had to stick me three times in trying to draw blood and then give me fluids. They gave me some insulin and we basically sat around until my blood sugar went back to about 265.

I got to take home a goodie bag of insulin, half a forest in papers, and a prick-your-finger thing.

I have to admit, I was hovering between crying and laughing half the time. I was just so tired and frustrated. The main thing that got me through was being able to text a few friends to distract myself the entire time.

Been a heck of a day.
 

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For goodness sake, Jenny! That was a rude awakening! I'm glad they took quick action . . . that's what you're paying them for!

Now it's beginning to look more like you could be type 1, so I'll be interested to hear what the other tests show.

Don't panic - ask all the questions you want - that's what we're here for!

and just for good measure, have a hug! ((((Jenny)))) ;)
 

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Wow. Tonight was interesting. My doctor's appointment ended up lasting 4 hours.

It started out fairly basic. The lab to determine if I have type 1 or type 2 hadn't come back yet and in the meantime they decided to put me on 3 units of once-a-day insulin and told me to start keeping track of my blood sugar before and after meals. In teaching me how to check my blood sugar, the nurse had me check mine there in front of her. I had a reading of 357.

At this point the nurse excused herself to go find the doctor.

I ended up in urgent care where an unfortunate nurse discovered my veins had declared war on needles and the poor woman had to stick me three times in trying to draw blood and then give me fluids. They gave me some insulin and we basically sat around until my blood sugar went back to about 265.

I got to take home a goodie bag of insulin, half a forest in papers, and a prick-your-finger thing.

I have to admit, I was hovering between crying and laughing half the time. I was just so tired and frustrated. The main thing that got me through was being able to text a few friends to distract myself the entire time.

Been a heck of a day.
Sorry you had such a horrible day. Trust me, it will be worth it once you get yourself under control. What kind of insulin did they give you to take? Did they give you any instructions on how often to test and diet guidelines? When do you see them again?
 
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