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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all. I'm new to the forums, and just learning about diabetes. I was first diagnosed 3 weeks ago after not feeling well and had some fairly high levels. Currently on Lantus/Apidra and closing in on the proper levels.

Lots to learn yet, and major adjustments to diet. My vision has been a bit scary at times too; my prescription went from a -7 to -3.5 after starting the insulin.
 
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Welcome Jason :) I'm on Apidra/Lantus too and the only down side I'm finding is that I've had more hypos than on oral meds (although I did have them on oral meds but not as often). I'm sure you'll find this a great place for support and info. Keep us posted on how you're doing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
A bit more info. I'm 37, and my fasting glucose was 13 on 4/14/11 and that is down to 6.8 this morning. Currently on 32 units of Lantus in the mornings and 5-6 units of Apidra before meals.

I still expect lots of diet changes, but it definitely has been an adjustment to lose my regular pop, chocolate, etc. The big thing right now seems to be figuring out carbs and portion sizes.

I did get some new glasses 2 weeks ago after the major vision shift, and I'm noticing this morning there is a slight shift again. How have others made out with this?
 

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I did get some new glasses 2 weeks ago after the major vision shift, and I'm noticing this morning there is a slight shift again. How have others made out with this?
Welcome, Jason!

Glad you found us!

Hopefully, you'll soon get an eye exam or 2 to rule out any diabetes-related complications.

As to that Shifty Eye Thing ... yeah, it happens. My own vision stopped bouncing around after I'd lowered my blood sugars. Getting there, however, was amusing. (... now ya see it ... now ya don't ... )

If I mess up and spike to 125 or so, the blur returns. Great early warning system! (I'd much prefer a little tinkling bell.)

Looking forward to getting better acquainted!
 

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I did get some new glasses 2 weeks ago after the major vision shift, and I'm noticing this morning there is a slight shift again. How have others made out with this?
Hi Jason - welcome to Diabetes Forum.
Re: our "shifty" eyes - it's a complete pain-in-the-prat! I spent the first whole year after my D diagnosis getting well under control so my vision would be as good as possible before I had cataract surgeries - my fastings were settling down in the mid-90s. Since then I've had three eye surgeries & my fastings go just about wherever they want. Taking care of my vision has become a fulltime job! :(
 
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A bit more info. I'm 37, and my fasting glucose was 13 on 4/14/11 and that is down to 6.8 this morning. Currently on 32 units of Lantus in the mornings and 5-6 units of Apidra before meals.

I still expect lots of diet changes, but it definitely has been an adjustment to lose my regular pop, chocolate, etc. The big thing right now seems to be figuring out carbs and portion sizes.

I did get some new glasses 2 weeks ago after the major vision shift, and I'm noticing this morning there is a slight shift again. How have others made out with this?
We're the same age :D yes, it's hard giving up what you like to eat. But I've always been taught all foods in moderation. I find I can get most foods to work for me as long as I'm smart in how I eat them. Of course I don't drink pop, but I occasionally enjoy a small serve of chocolate still. You just need to factor in foods to your day... keep most of your food you eat healthy and you can still enjoy a treat. I eat carbs every meal/snack personally... but that's me. I know others here may not do the same. I basically probably eat almost half the amount I used to eat in carbs at meals and I find that works quite well. I also pick the right type of carbs that I know works for me (look up glycemic index which will help with that... low GI is what is better). You just have to keep testing to find out the right foods and quantities for you... we're all so different.
 

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Hello Jason,welcome! Your eyes should be in great shape after this adjustment period is completed. Having a more stable control will accomplish that, and enable you to have a long, healthy life. I have been type 1 for 65 years, and am very healthy.

Good luck during the weeks ahead!

Richard
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the welcomes. I did see my optometrist 2 weeks ago before getting the new glasses and everything was fine except for the radical vision shift. I must be starting to level out now as I tried my old lenses today and they seem better then the new ones which started blurring yesterday.

Seems like there is alot of good info on the forum, so lots more browsing to do.
 

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Nightime hypoglecemia

Hello folks,

Happy Mother's Day to all you hard-working moms.

I am able to manage my daytime blood glucose rather well. I take Metformin 2550mg, and 0.5mg Glyclazide and other non-diabetic meds. Dx'd since last year my overall-average has been 6.2 to 6.9.

I am worried about getting a hypo while I am asleep. Do any of you know how to prevent this, for example my measuring around 9:00 pm before going to bed and snacking? This a.m. upon awakening I was 6.9.

Thank you for any tips.:popcorn:
 

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My average fasting is usually very close to 5 (90). I don't have any hypos while sleeping, but I did have them for many years before using an insulin pump. I used to eat a high protein snack before bedtime. The protein digested slowly, and carried me through the night.
 

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My average fasting is usually very close to 5 (90). I don't have any hypos while sleeping, but I did have them for many years before using an insulin pump. I used to eat a high protein snack before bedtime. The protein digested slowly, and carried me through the night.
Thank you for the tip Richard157. Protein it will be; and I will look up your book. Cheers

Irene
 
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Hello folks,

Happy Mother's Day to all you hard-working moms.

I am able to manage my daytime blood glucose rather well. I take Metformin 2550mg, and 0.5mg Glyclazide and other non-diabetic meds. Dx'd since last year my overall-average has been 6.2 to 6.9.

I am worried about getting a hypo while I am asleep. Do any of you know how to prevent this, for example my measuring around 9:00 pm before going to bed and snacking? This a.m. upon awakening I was 6.9.

Thank you for any tips.:popcorn:
Hi Irene
I usually have a snack before bed as Richard has mentioned. I inject my insulin and I'm still finding that sometimes the snack doesn't stop me from having a hypo. I had one the night before, registered 3.3 on my meter and the hypo lasted an hour. I did wake up though... my doc told me not to worry as you wake up (but I'm not so sure about that... I don't always... but my liver helps me out with that one by dumping). I actually felt hypo earlier this morning but I obviously had a liver dump to bring my sugar back up. Sometimes I find things go swimmingly with my BGLs, and others times they don't. That's the annoying part of diabetes, you don't always have complete control of it.
 

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Nightime hypos - from Richard and onlymep

Hi Irene
I usually have a snack before bed as Richard has mentioned. I inject my insulin and I'm still finding that sometimes the snack doesn't stop me from having a hypo. I had one the night before, registered 3.3 on my meter and the hypo lasted an hour. I did wake up though... my doc told me not to worry as you wake up (but I'm not so sure about that... I don't always... but my liver helps me out with that one by dumping). I actually felt hypo earlier this morning but I obviously had a liver dump to bring my sugar back up. Sometimes I find things go swimmingly with my BGLs, and others times they don't. That's the annoying part of diabetes, you don't always have complete control of it.

Hi onlymep,

So the liver goes on alert during a hypo? That's a good safeguard. I suppose if you are taking insulin which stimulates a hypo episode, the earlier you take it in the day, the better. I take mine (oral) at lunch and supper. You probably have a stricter regimen to cope with and maybe the half-life of your drugs is longer? I am sorry you reached the terrible threes, but so glad you woke up.

Personally, i find i am more comfortable on the high side than the low (within limits). But, after looking at the images of complications on the net, i am a bit queasy, so i try to be as low as possible. That is harder for me to do and the prospect of a nightime Big Sleep is kind of scary.

take care
 
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Hi onlymep,

So the liver goes on alert during a hypo? That's a good safeguard. I suppose if you are taking insulin which stimulates a hypo episode, the earlier you take it in the day, the better. I take mine (oral) at lunch and supper. You probably have a stricter regimen to cope with and maybe the half-life of your drugs is longer? I am sorry you reached the terrible threes, but so glad you woke up.

Personally, i find i am more comfortable on the high side than the low (within limits). But, after looking at the images of complications on the net, i am a bit queasy, so i try to be as low as possible. That is harder for me to do and the prospect of a nightime Big Sleep is kind of scary.

take care
yeah it certainly does... well I think it does for most people? I recall my doc telling me that some people can't recognise hypos and don't get liver dumps... that would be scary. I can usually tell if I've had a hypo when I wake up (if I didn't wake up during the hypo) as I'm feeling the symptoms still, but testing Ok. I obviously take an hour to recover when I drop too low... but this could be longer if I miss it and my liver dumps instead? I take my bolus throughout the day, and I take the basal at bedtime... this is based on my endo's instructions. He has given Ok to adjust my bolus if I want, but he doesn't want me adjusting basal... although this may change next time he sees me as I've been in 4's a lot in the morning, and he wants me to be 5 as minimum. During the day I can go into hypo <4.5... so I need to be careful. I know what you mean by staying a bit higher. My endo advised me to aim for 7 at bedtime too.
 

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nightime hypos

yeah it certainly does... well I think it does for most people? I recall my doc telling me that some people can't recognise hypos and don't get liver dumps... that would be scary. I can usually tell if I've had a hypo when I wake up (if I didn't wake up during the hypo) as I'm feeling the symptoms still, but testing Ok. I obviously take an hour to recover when I drop too low... but this could be longer if I miss it and my liver dumps instead? I take my bolus throughout the day, and I take the basal at bedtime... this is based on my endo's instructions. He has given Ok to adjust my bolus if I want, but he doesn't want me adjusting basal... although this may change next time he sees me as I've been in 4's a lot in the morning, and he wants me to be 5 as minimum. During the day I can go into hypo <4.5... so I need to be careful. I know what you mean by staying a bit higher. My endo advised me to aim for 7 at bedtime too.
I hope your endocrinologist can adjust your bolus and basals if they are the cause of low numbers, especially at nightime. Though highs are bad in the long-run can create serious complications, such lows as you have may also have sudden adverse effects, and then there is the embarrassing recovery time after you have one - rather disruptive of daily routine. I don't know if you have had this symptom but when I go to 4ish or below, the worst thing i feel is something is like a heart/chest tightness and panic attack (which I have had almost all my life actually). And the more dangerous i think is the diminished cognitive focus.
 
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I hope your endocrinologist can adjust your bolus and basals if they are the cause of low numbers, especially at nightime. Though highs are bad in the long-run can create serious complications, such lows as you have may also have sudden adverse effects, and then there is the embarrassing recovery time after you have one - rather disruptive of daily routine. I don't know if you have had this symptom but when I go to 4ish or below, the worst thing i feel is something is like a heart/chest tightness and panic attack (which I have had almost all my life actually). And the more dangerous i think is the diminished cognitive focus.
I think my main problem right now is my stomach condition... it makes my BGLs unpredictable. I think my endo has my basal dosage right as usually I don't get the hypos at night, but occasionally I do. The symptoms I normally get with hypos is firstly that weird feeling in your chest (more anxiety type feeling), then the shakes, nausea, and everything starts up. If I have hypo during the day and I'm actually walking about, the first thing I do is pull to my left suddenly (I do it every time I get a hypo when walking too... the first time it happened I hit a wall with my head), then I get the shakes, etc. The worst I get is slurred speech and I've had that a few times already. I got a little disturbed about that when my endo said that the next symptom is unconsciousness usually. That's why my endo wants me above 5 I think as he's trying to stop me from having hypos. He explained they're bad for you to have too many of them. I had 6 in a week once and he got upset about that and adjusted my insulin. But because of stomach condition it does make it tricky to work out. I'm not a fan of hypos... I've definitely had more of them on insulin though... some scarier than others. I don't like being too high either, makes you feel aweful. It's such a balancing act for us all.
 

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The lows (4 and under) do feel as if you are drunk at times. Like your endocrinologist, my doctor and diabetic team really don't like hypoglycemia, and changed my anti-diabetic drug from glubutride to glyclazide -- personally i think they are not much different and the glubutried was better. They just saw more hypos when I was a novice. As for the highs (10 and up) I just fall asleep and really don't feel bad. But the medical sites say that complications can start as low as consistently 7 and up. It is controversial.
 
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