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This info is about the treatment of autoimmune diseases using Low Dose Naltrexon. It is not being used for Type 1 diabetes by one must ask why.


A piece from an LDN website


Bihari et al found that a low oral dose of naltrexone, when taken at bedtime, led to a doubling or tripling of low levels of circulating beta-endorphin.7 Bihari has since treated some 100 people with autoimmune disorders. None of them has progressed further while the patient continued taking low dose naltrexone each night at bedtime. Since no side effects are apparently associated with its use, this medication might well be studied as a possible preventive for Type I diabetes in those youngsters with beta-cell autoantibodies.


Treatment for Crohn's being researched at Penn State University

Chrone's disease is described as an infamatory, autoimmune disease with no known cure.

A great demonstration is the sucess shown in Chrone's disease at Penn State.

If it could have the same effect on pancreatic cells and return them to health. Maybe it would only help early on in the honeymoon period or at least help retain some pancreatic function.

Past Completed Clinical Trials of Low Dose Naltrexone

> Penn State Trial for Crohn's Disease

Endoscopic Improvement in Crohn’s Colitis with Naltrexone

See attached files:






Figure A: Shown is the rectum of a subject with active Crohn’s Disease before starting therapy with naltrexone 4.5 mg/day. The mucosa is ulcerated, edematous, and inflamed.
Figure B: Shows the same area of the rectum in the same patient four weeks after naltrexone therapy. The lining is now healed, ulcers resolved, and the mucosa is healthy.
Copyrights: do not reproduce the above images and captions without written permission from Jill P. Smith, MD, Professor of Medicine, H-045 GI Division, Penn State College of Medicine, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033

The report on this groundbreaking research—"Low-Dose Naltrexone as a Treatment For Active Crohn's Disease"—was presented on May 23, 2006 at Digestive Diseases Week, a prestigious gastrointestinal conference, by Professor Jill Smith of the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine. Dr. Smith's research paper, "Low-Dose Naltrexone Therapy Improves Active Crohn’s Disease," has been published by the American Journal of Gastroenterology in its January 11, 2007 edition.

Dr. Smith and her colleagues concluded that "LDN therapy offers an alternative safe, effective, and economic means of treating subjects with active Crohn's disease."

According to the news from Penn State, the National Institutes of Health has already granted $500,000 for Dr. Smith's group to continue the study. This funding should help assure a full-fledged placebo-controlled scientific trial of LDN in Crohn's disease. (Notably, Dr. Smith and her research teams are also involved in exploring the direct effects of using a form of endorphin by infusion in order to treat pancreatic and colon cancer.)

Some links for this discussion:

http://www.lowdosenaltrexone.org/

http://www.lowdosenaltrexone.org/ldn_and_ms.htm
 

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Thanks for the interesting post. As a new member you are not able to post links until some time has passed. I hope you don't mind that I added two links at the end of your discussion. If there are others you want added then send me a private message. (See the upper right corner of the page.)
 

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Thanks for the interesting post. As a new member you are not able to post links until some time has passed. I hope you don't mind that I added two links at the end of your discussion. If there are others you want added then send me a private message. (See the upper right corner of the page.)
Thanks Richard

This stuff is very real for MS and Chrone's
 
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