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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I thought that a thread that contained newbie tips would be fun and then the tips would be all together. I am sure we all have something to share whether it be meds, testing, diet, exercise, ect. So I will start by reminding all new diabetics and all diabetics to do the following every year:

Preventive Care

A1C-Should be done every 3-6 months
Comprehensive Foot Exam-1 time per year, more if you have foot issues
Blood Pressure Check-every doctor visit
Eye Exam (dilated)-every year
Microalbumin (protein in urine)-every year
Fasting Lipid Profile-every year, more if your levels are elevated and you use a statin drug
Flu Shot-every year
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Intro To Diabetes

 

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The first tip that I would give to a non-insulin-dependent Type 2 (NIDD) would be to start testing - even if healthcare professionals tell you not to.

The second tip to the same group of people would be to reduce their starchy carbohydrate intake (e.g. cereals, bread, potatoes, pasta, rice, pizza etc) because that usually leads to a big improvement in blood glucose levels - and very quickly too.
 

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If you are insulin dependant T1 don't be afraid to adjust your bolus and base dosages withouth consulting your doctor, however do so slowly at first until you grasp how your body reacts to what changes. Sometimes a base too high can be the cause of a high BG in the morning.

The folowing is especialy good if you live where the seasons really change (winter is normally below 0 and summers are hot, in other words when the only change in winter isn't just some rain and winds): during summer you will most likely need less insulin total per day than in the winter. This is especialy important towards the evening and night.
 

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If you are insulin dependant T1 don't be afraid to adjust your bolus and base dosages withouth consulting your doctor, however do so slowly at first until you grasp how your body reacts to what changes. Sometimes a base too high can be the cause of a high BG in the morning.

The folowing is especialy good if you live where the seasons really change (winter is normally below 0 and summers are hot, in other words when the only change in winter isn't just some rain and winds): during summer you will most likely need less insulin total per day than in the winter. This is especialy important towards the evening and night.

This is good for T2 also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The first tip that I would give to a non-insulin-dependent Type 2 (NIDD) would be to start testing - even if healthcare professionals tell you not to.

The second tip to the same group of people would be to reduce their starchy carbohydrate intake (e.g. cereals, bread, potatoes, pasta, rice, pizza etc) because that usually leads to a big improvement in blood glucose levels - and very quickly too.
Thanks for the info, I am sure that this information will help a newbie. I really would like to see this thread grow and become a valuable resource to the forum, if you have any other tips, please post them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If you are insulin dependant T1 don't be afraid to adjust your bolus and base dosages withouth consulting your doctor, however do so slowly at first until you grasp how your body reacts to what changes. Sometimes a base too high can be the cause of a high BG in the morning.

The folowing is especialy good if you live where the seasons really change (winter is normally below 0 and summers are hot, in other words when the only change in winter isn't just some rain and winds): during summer you will most likely need less insulin total per day than in the winter. This is especialy important towards the evening and night.
Thanks for the info, I am sure that this information will help a newbie. I really would like to see this thread grow and become a valuable resource to the forum, if you have any other tips, please post them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
This is good for T2 also.
Thanks for the info, I am sure that this information will help a newbie. I really would like to see this thread grow and become a valuable resource to the forum, if you have any other tips, please post them.
 

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Thanks for the info, I am sure that this information will help a newbie. I really would like to see this thread grow and become a valuable resource to the forum, if you have any other tips, please post them.
Yes - I agree! But why not have a thread for the different categories to prevent newbies from getting confused - e.g. at least, insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent? Maybe others categories too?

John
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes - I agree! But why not have a thread for the different categories to prevent newbies from getting confused - e.g. at least, insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent? Maybe others categories too?

John
I was just trying to see what the response would be for the newbie tips. We can always break out the different categories. For the most part, insulin-dependent and non-insulin dependent do not have any different ways to control their diabetes. The diet and exercise is the same. The only difference is that some need insulin and some don't or do not wish to take it. I am T2 and on insulin. I started off with just oral medication and then it stopped working and I needed to go on insulin. I still watch my carbs and have to exercise just like a T2 not on insulin.
 

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Hi breezeonby,

I don't understand it when you say that "insulin-dependent and non-insulin dependent do not have any different ways to control their diabetes". To me there seems to be a massive difference. For one aspect alone being that an insulin-dependent diabetic has hypos to be very careful of avoiding when non-insulin-dependent diabetics such as me on metformin only aren't in any real danger of having a serious hypo.

In any case, I would expect a newbie non-insulin-dependent Type 2 such as me to be very confused by reading about all the complications of managing different insulin regimes. I've been fairly active on these diabetes forums for some time now and, as a non-insulin-dependent Type 2, I've hardly any idea whatsoever as to what it all means to insulin-dependent diabetics.

Anyway, whatever you think - it was just an idea!

Best wishes - John
 

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Hi breezeonby,

I don't understand it when you say that "insulin-dependent and non-insulin dependent do not have any different ways to control their diabetes". To me there seems to be a massive difference. For one aspect alone being that an insulin-dependent diabetic has hypos to be very careful of avoiding when non-insulin-dependent diabetics such as me aren't in any real danger of having a serious hypo.

In any case, I would expect a newbie non-insulin-dependent Type 2 such as me to be very confused by reading about all the complications of managing different insulin regimes. I've been fairly active on these diabetes forums for some time now and, as a non-insulin-dependent Type 2, I've hardly any idea whatsoever as to what it all means to insulin-dependent diabetics.

Anyway, whatever you think - it was just an idea!

Best wishes - John

There are some drugs out there that Md's continue to prescribe :eek: that force the pancreas to produce more insulin. When on those drugs you can go hipo andseriouslyy hipo.
 

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There are some drugs out there that Md's continue to prescribe :eek: that force the pancreas to produce more insulin. When on those drugs you can go hipo andseriouslyy hipo.
Yes - I know! That was the exact reason for my suggestion to separate the tips into the various categories.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yes - I know! That was the exact reason for my suggestion to separate the tips into the various categories.
These drugs are prescribed for non and insulin dependent T2.

The purpose of my thread was to give the newbie some "basic tips".
 

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Read a thread in the lounge and had another idea:

When you go and buy glucose tablets there might be several different types. Try out several types and use the ones that seem to be softer. The harder ones ussually take longer to melt in your mouth. If I remember my biology right, glucose is the one sugar that is disolved and taken into the body right there in the mouth, so it has to melt quickly. Some melt slower than others. Try to choose one that is the fastest. I use a german make (at least it says Traubenzucker on the packet) and I guess the manufacturer is intact since that's the only other logo on it. 12 tablets per packet. Very good fast melting glucose tablets
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Read a thread in the lounge and had another idea:

When you go and buy glucose tablets there might be several different types. Try out several types and use the ones that seem to be softer. The harder ones ussually take longer to melt in your mouth. If I remember my biology right, glucose is the one sugar that is disolved and taken into the body right there in the mouth, so it has to melt quickly. Some melt slower than others. Try to choose one that is the fastest. I use a german make (at least it says Traubenzucker on the packet) and I guess the manufacturer is intact since that's the only other logo on it. 12 tablets per packet. Very good fast melting glucose tablets
Thanks for the new tip! Much appreciated!
 
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