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Hello everyone,

I am a 29-year-old woman and just found out that I have type 2 diabetes early in October. However, looking back on my symptoms, I've probably had it for nearly three years unchecked. For the past two to three years, I've had nearly constant fatigue, brain fog, horrible sugar cravings (that I always obeyed), thirst, increased and heavy urination at times, and recurrent yeast infections. I also had occasionally inflamed gums, cuts that took a while to heal, and so forth. What a way to live. Unfortunately, I am the kind of person who won't go to the doctor no matter how bad I feel unless I am dragged there, and my husband finally dragged me there last month.

My glucose reading was 223 (and I hadn't eaten in about 12 hours), and my A1C was 9.8. Not good. The really scary thing is that I cut out sodas last July, so who knows how bad it was back then? I was a sodaholic prior to July. Anyway, diabetes runs in my family, and I am obese, so it was really no huge surprise. I am 5'7" and was about 225 at the time of my visit to the doctor.

I was put on metformin (500 mg per day) that day and I have changed my diet drastically since then. I have only been drinking water, herbal tea, and occasionally oolong tea - all unsweetened, of course. I do not use any type of artificial sweetener either, as I just don't like them (except for stevia, which is good, but I'm not currently using it).

One problem for me is that I am a vegetarian, and I'm trying to go low carb. That is pretty much an oxymoron, but I'm doing the best I can with "Eco-Atkins", the vegetarian version of Atkins.

I am now walking 30-45 minutes per day on a hilly dirt road around our neighborhood. It's good exercise with nice, fresh air. I have only missed one day of walking since I was diagnosed.

I have lost ten pounds in about a month (now at 215). That's a lot, but not really surprising considering how hard I have been working on it and all the changes my body has been experiencing since the first week in October. When I check my glucose in the mornings, it's always between 120 and 130. Still high, but hey, it's coming down from 223. Originally my doctor had wanted me to start two metformin pills per day after the first week on it, but she was pleased with my progress and told me to stay on just one. I'm glad, because I've had a couple of side effects from it (see my thread on the treatment section of the forum if you're interested).

Anyway, it's been a big wake up call for me. I've learned to stop avoiding the doctor when I know I need to go. Most of all, I've learned to stop taking my health for granted just because I'm still under a certain age. Health is never a guarantee at any age. I have taken such poor care of myself for so many years. Now, I am trying to heal myself, get down to a good BMI and waist measurement, and learn to enjoy life for reasons other than eating and drinking what tastes good. There is so much more to life than that.
 

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Hello and welcome aboard! Your seeing a doctor, getting much better control and joining our site clearly shows you are taking your diabetes seriously. That is a lot of progress you have made and in such a short time. If you have any questions please ask them. We are here to help.

Now I will go see your other post.

Richard
 

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My glucose reading was 223 (and I hadn't eaten in about 12 hours), and my A1C was 9.8. Not good.
One problem for me is that I am a vegetarian, and I'm trying to go low carb. That is pretty much an oxymoron, but I'm doing the best I can with "Eco-Atkins", the vegetarian version of Atkins.

I am now walking 30-45 minutes per day on a hilly dirt road around our neighborhood. It's good exercise with nice, fresh air. I have only missed one day of walking since I was diagnosed.

I have lost ten pounds in about a month (now at 215). That's a lot, but not really surprising considering how hard I have been working on it and all the changes my body has been experiencing since the first week in October. When I check my glucose in the mornings, it's always between 120 and 130. Still high, but hey, it's coming down from 223.
Your numbers are really reflecting the change in your system. Diet is one part, but the exercise can really make a difference, so I hope you can stay with it, and keep pushing yourself. Morning numbers like 120 are a good sign, and it appears you are on your way to going below 100. That is not easy, so pat yourself on the back. You done good!

Weight loss does all kinds of good things for your body's health. A ten percent lose, no matter where you started from, is like being reborn physically. I was dx'd as T2 in July, and since mid July till a few days ago, I have lost 22 pounds, down to 217. I am hoping to see the next ten coming off from around my waist :) Dang, that is hard stuff to get rid of, although a lot has gone away. My BP is down, I feel better when I go hiking, and now I am faced with punching new holes in my belt to keep my pants up LoL! Not gonna buy any new clothes till I find out where my weight finally settles in. I have no illusions of matching the government mandate that I be 172 pounds. At six foot, I will be very happy to be 200. Not bad for 54 years old. That will have to do.

Good for you. If your morning numbers have come down from that 230 into the 120-130 area, your A1c number is going to come down pretty quick as well.

I would be interested in hearing about your diet tho. A vegetarian should already be pretty low carb, so it will teach me a lot to learn what you are doing, and how your numbers are coming along from those changes. Perhaps it will show a lot of us what else we can do to keep the carbs down.

Hope you are willing to share. Don't wish to sound trite, but the first few months are the beast, and after that, when the anger and frustration has played out, the changes seem to come a little easier.

Keep the faith!

John
 

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Richard, I do admire that you have kept your diabetes under control for so long. They were just starting with insulin and diabetes treatment when your parents learned you had it, weren't they? I seem to remember something about insulin use starting about 1944, am I correct?
My husband's nephew has diabetes, type 1. He has taken insulin since he was 3 and he is now 46. I can only hope that he does as well as you have.
Squareone, it sounds as though you are on the right track. I understand how you feel. I did not take care of myself as well as I should have when I was working at a high pressure job that took about 70 hours of my time each week - the good salary really wasn't worth it. I ate too much fast food, candy bars for lunch and break, and got only sporadic exercise for many years. Now I too am having to make the necessary changes. I feel this board is very useful, because you don't feel you are alone, and you can get support and information from others, which of course you can use or not use, but at least it's there. Good luck with your efforts.
 

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Jer, Insulin was discovered in 1921 and first sold in 1923. That was 22 years before my diagnosis. I was 6 when diagnosed. My parents were told nothing except to not let me eat food with high sugar content. I ate hundreds of carbs every day for more than 40 years, so my control was NOT good. It was not my fault, or my parents' fault. The doctor did not know either. I am sure I had very high blood sugar all those years, but I do not have complications. Research suggests that is because the beef/pork insulin used during those years contained C-peptide, which protects us from complications.
 

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Jer, Insulin was discovered in 1921 and first sold in 1923. That was 22 years before my diagnosis. I was 6 when diagnosed. My parents were told nothing except to not let me eat food with high sugar content. I ate hundreds of carbs every day for more than 40 years, so my control was NOT good. It was not my fault, or my parents' fault. The doctor did not know either. I am sure I had very high blood sugar all those years, but I do not have complications. Research suggests that is because the beef/pork insulin used during those years contained C-peptide, which protects us from complications.
You're right, Richard. I must have been thinking about the refinements that came along, starting about 1936 with the Protamine zinc insulin. I know in the late 1960's and early 70's when my nephew started taking shots, he had to take one before each meal. For a child, that wasn't any fun, although of course for an adult it wouldn't be either. He also had a lot of insulin reactions. I got pretty good at noticing when one was coming on. I don't think a lot of the rest of the family realized how tough it was on this couple with their two children, one a diabetic, and how it was not only a day to day process, but hour to hour as well and how much monitoring it took the first few years, until he was a teenager, but even then. They also had to make sure the school officials and the school bus driver would know what to do in case a reaction came on.
 

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Hi squareone

Hello everyone,

I am a 29-year-old woman and just found out that I have type 2 diabetes early in October. However, looking back on my symptoms, I've probably had it for nearly three years unchecked. For the past two to three years, I've had nearly constant fatigue, brain fog, horrible sugar cravings (that I always obeyed), thirst, increased and heavy urination at times, and recurrent yeast infections. I also had occasionally inflamed gums, cuts that took a while to heal, and so forth. What a way to live. Unfortunately, I am the kind of person who won't go to the doctor no matter how bad I feel unless I am dragged there, and my husband finally dragged me there last month.

My glucose reading was 223 (and I hadn't eaten in about 12 hours), and my A1C was 9.8. Not good. The really scary thing is that I cut out sodas last July, so who knows how bad it was back then? I was a sodaholic prior to July. Anyway, diabetes runs in my family, and I am obese, so it was really no huge surprise. I am 5'7" and was about 225 at the time of my visit to the doctor.

I was put on metformin (500 mg per day) that day and I have changed my diet drastically since then. I have only been drinking water, herbal tea, and occasionally oolong tea - all unsweetened, of course. I do not use any type of artificial sweetener either, as I just don't like them (except for stevia, which is good, but I'm not currently using it).

One problem for me is that I am a vegetarian, and I'm trying to go low carb. That is pretty much an oxymoron, but I'm doing the best I can with "Eco-Atkins", the vegetarian version of Atkins.

I am now walking 30-45 minutes per day on a hilly dirt road around our neighborhood. It's good exercise with nice, fresh air. I have only missed one day of walking since I was diagnosed.

I have lost ten pounds in about a month (now at 215). That's a lot, but not really surprising considering how hard I have been working on it and all the changes my body has been experiencing since the first week in October. When I check my glucose in the mornings, it's always between 120 and 130. Still high, but hey, it's coming down from 223. Originally my doctor had wanted me to start two metformin pills per day after the first week on it, but she was pleased with my progress and told me to stay on just one. I'm glad, because I've had a couple of side effects from it (see my thread on the treatment section of the forum if you're interested).

Anyway, it's been a big wake up call for me. I've learned to stop avoiding the doctor when I know I need to go. Most of all, I've learned to stop taking my health for granted just because I'm still under a certain age. Health is never a guarantee at any age. I have taken such poor care of myself for so many years. Now, I am trying to heal myself, get down to a good BMI and waist measurement, and learn to enjoy life for reasons other than eating and drinking what tastes good. There is so much more to life than that.
I'm new to this forum too (I found it last week and read several posts). My story is similar to yours...constant fatigue and brain fog for a very long time. I'm 5'5", ~205 lbs and I don't care for artificial sweeteners. I have exercised in the past (running and indoor rowing) and need to get started again. I'm delaying it because I have low iron and am in the process of figuring out the right amount.

Hope to see you around more,
not yet
 
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